COVID-19 resources on infection control

Results 41 - 50 of 394

Order by    Date Title

What people are telling us: a summary July – September 2020

Healthwatch England

This report forms part of the regular updates for NHS and social care service leaders about the key issues that matter to the public. It covers the period July - September 2020 and is informed by 38,082 people’s experiences of care. The update looks at the specific issues people have raised in relation to: accessing NHS dental care; the support provided in care homes; getting COVID-19 tests. The report also provides an overview of the online advice and information the public are seeking from Healthwatch England and feedback on how people feel about their care by health and social care service area. More than 7 in 10 people (73%) found it difficult to access help and support when they needed it compared to just over 1 in 10 (11%) who could access care easily; and more than half of people (51%) expressed negative sentiments about dentistry compared with 1 in 25 (4%) who said something positive. Care homes have faced incredible challenges during the pandemic, with coronavirus disproportionately affecting residents. An ongoing concern for many remains the process for arranging visits to and from care homes for residents. The restriction in visits to and from friends and family is leading to increased isolation, loneliness and the physical and mental deterioration of care home residents. With some residents not receiving any visits at all since March, it is more important than ever that the health, welfare, rights and wellbeing of residents are prioritised.

Last updated on hub: 10 December 2020

The courage to be kind: reflecting on the role of kindness in the healthcare response to COVID-19

Carnegie UK Trust

Findings from reflective conversations of a cluster of doctors in leadership programmes on the experience and new ways of working as a result of the pandemic. The five participants in the project were able to reflect on the COVID response from roles within Scottish Government, local health board management, hospital medicine, emergency department and general practice. This report presents a thematic analysis of what was heard across these reflective conversations. It is structured chronologically and, in doing so, it tells a story of people’s experiences of change across the NHS through three distinct phases: lockdown (April-May), lifting lockdown (June-July), and remobilising (August-September). Each phase is broken down into key themes, with the voice of participants woven between. The report finishes with a discussion that summarises what has been learnt about kindness and relationships in the first six months of COVID, and considers what this might mean for the future. Although they reflected shifting dynamics, pressures and emotions, the three phases of conversations present a clear focus on what is important, and an indication of what should be valued and prioritised in health and social care renewal, in order to build a system that looks after the wellbeing of patients and staff: a meaningful conversation about staff wellbeing – too often the individual can be overlooked in conversations about the system; sustaining a common purpose – the clear focus on COVID-19 demanded and enabled a more relational approach and, more widely, kindness became a feature of interactions among staff and leadership; shifting the emphasis on targets – the experience of COVID-19 may open up a much wider conversation about how best to fit targets to a system in a way that delivers the best for both patients and staff.

Last updated on hub: 10 December 2020

Social distancing in a social therapy environment

Therapeutic Communities: the International Journal of Therapeutic Communities

Purpose: This paper aims to describe the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on a prison-based therapeutic community (TC). Design/methodology/approach: The paper takes the form of a case study where the authors reflect on their current practice, using the findings of research on social isolation and the overarching TC principles to explore the effect of the pandemic on the TC at HMP Grendon. The authors consider how the residents and staff adjusted to the change as the parameters changed when the social distancing rules were imposed and how they adapted to the prolonged break to therapy. Sections in the paper were written by a resident and an operational member of staff. The authors conclude with their thoughts on how to manage the consequences the lockdown has brought and start to think about what returning to “normality” might mean. Findings: The paper describes the adjustments made by the residents and staff as the UK Government imposed the lockdown. The authors, including a resident and an operational member of staff comment on the psychological and practical impact these adjustments had. The thought is given to the idea of “recovery”, returning to “normality” and how this study can be best managed once restrictions are lifted. Research limitations/implications: At the time of writing, there are no confirmed cases of COVID-19 at HMP Grendon. The measures and commitment from all staff and residents in the prison to keep the prison environment safe may in part account for this. This paper explores the effects of lockdown on the emotional environment in a TC and highlights the consequences that social isolation can have on any individual. To the authors’ knowledge, there is currently no research undertaken on the impact of lockdown/social isolation on a TC. This research would be useful, as the authors postulate from reflections on current practice that the effects of the lockdown will be greater in a social therapy environment. Originality/value: HMP Grendon started in 1962, as this time there have been no significant events that have meant the suspension of therapy for such a sustained period. It is, therefore, important that the impact of such is considered and reflected upon.

Last updated on hub: 09 December 2020

Safeguarding adults practice and remote working in the COVID-19 era: challenges and opportunities

Journal of Adult Protection

Purpose: This exploratory paper aims to examine the literature on the impact of COVID-19 on safeguarding adults practice. Design/methodology/approach: A literature search was carried out in recently published articles to locate literature relating to COVID-19 and safeguarding adults in the UK and internationally. This included policy guidance and law, to describe the existing knowledge base, gaps in practice and areas that may require further research. Findings: The findings suggest that measures to curb the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic gave rise to remote working and virtual safeguarding practice. The findings highlight the need for empirical research into the impact of virtual safeguarding adults assessments and effective ways to support the needs and outcomes of those who may be at risk of or experiencing abuse and neglect while shielding, socially isolating or when working in an environment where social distancing is required. Research limitations/implications: The paper is based on a review and analysis of published documents and not on other types of research. Originality/value: Little is known about effective safeguarding adults practice in the era of shielding, self-isolation, social distancing and remote working. The paper adds to the body of knowledge in the field.

Last updated on hub: 09 December 2020

#LeftInLockdown – parent carers’ experiences of lockdown

Disabled Children’s Partnership

Findings from an online survey to assess the impact of the coronavirus pandemic and lockdown on families with disabled children across the UK. The survey was promoted between 1 -17 May 2020 via social channels, direct emails to supporters of DCP charities, parent carer groups and networks. The survey covers the following areas: caring in lockdown, information and support, health and social care, education and learning; money and work; and what the government could do to help now and with the transition from lockdown. Parents report an increased caring load, both for themselves and for their disabled children's siblings; they feel exhausted, stressed, anxious and abandoned by society – in many cases, the support families previously received has now stopped. Many families are seeing declines in both mental and physical health – parents are particularly concerned about the pressure of children's behaviour and mental wellbeing; managing home-schooling; and what will happen to their children if they contract Covid-19. The little support that had previously been provided for families has often stopped altogether. Children's friendships, learning and communications, mental and physical health, and emotions and behaviour have all been negatively impacted. In addition, the lockdown is increasing financial pressures on families. Parents call for action now, including: acknowledgement and respect for their situation and the challenges they face; increased support – both financial and services; information and guidance more specifically at families with disabled children; flexibility – including from employers, schools, and around lockdown rules to enable family and friends to provide support.

Last updated on hub: 09 December 2020

Coronavirus (COVID-19) and health inequalities

Welsh Government

The objective of this paper is to understand current and future health inequalities around COVID-19 and suggest some potential mitigations for these inequalities. Based on data from the first few months, the report reveals that people in the most deprived fifth of the population in Wales are twice as likely to be admitted to hospital, to end up in ICU, and to die from COVID-19 as those from the least deprived fifth. Data from England and some limited data for Wales suggest there has been proportionally more hospital admissions and deaths in BAME groups. In addition, deprived groups may be more vulnerable to indirect COVID-19 harms due to additional pressures on the health and social care system; and they may be more vulnerable to harms from lockdown changing people’s way of life and affecting their mental health, as well as their physical health, and for some, increasing the risk of domestic violence or children being exposed to adverse childhood experiences and trauma. The main recommendation of this report is to try to protect the most deprived population from the direct effects of COVID19 in a potential second wave, and from the indirect effects of COVID-19 on the economy which will increase health inequalities in the longer term. We will know we have succeeded in this if the gradient in COVID-19 mortality is less steep in future than in the first peak and if we see a reduction in the gradient in all-cause mortality in 2022, given that it is unlikely that inequalities will reduce in the next two years. In the longer term we need to look at policies to increase health and financial resilience across the population.

Last updated on hub: 09 December 2020

Care home LFD testing of visitors guidance

Department of Health and Social Care

This guidance is for all care homes who are receiving lateral flow device (LFD) test kits and explains how to prepare and manage lateral flow testing for visitors. Testing visitors can reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission but it does not completely remove the risk of infection. When used alongside robust infection prevention and control (IPC) measures such as personal protective equipment (PPE) it can support care homes to safely maintain a balance between infection control and the vital benefits of visiting to the health and wellbeing of residents.

Last updated on hub: 09 December 2020

Testing service for extra care and supported living settings

Department of Health and Social Care

Guidance on regular retesting for extra care and supported living settings that meet the eligibility criteria. NHS Test and Trace is making regular COVID-19 testing available to eligible extra care and supported living settings in England. In order to be eligible for testing, extra care and supported living settings must meet both of the following criteria: a closed community with substantial facilities shared between multiple people; where most residents receive the kind of personal care that is CQC regulated (rather than help with cooking, cleaning and shopping). This guidance covers: why testing is important; what to do if you have an outbreak; the end-to-end testing process; unique organisation number; preparing your setting; registering completed tests; returning test kits; results; where to go for support; step-by-step guide for registering a test kit after completing a test.

Last updated on hub: 08 December 2020

Impact of COVID-19 on care and contact: experiences in the first COVID-19 lockdown on foster carers and young people in their care: research summary

Research In Practice: Dartington

This report summarises the findings from three questionnaires, which were designed to explore the impact of lockdown on young people in and leaving care. The three questionnaires were designed for: young people in care or with care experience; carers; and birth parents. Many young people and carers described how lockdown had given them more quality time to spend with families or those they live with; over 90% of those in foster care reported relationships at home had improved or stayed the same during lockdown. There were mixed views on virtual family time. While some felt it was a more flexible and convenient option which gave young people more control over the situation, the lack of physical contact was an issue for some, as was the additional responsibility this placed on foster carers to help manage family time. In respect of virtual contact with social workers / personal advisors, over 80% of young people and 90% of carers felt this was the same or better than their contact prior to lockdown, citing increased availability and convenience. However, some people felt there had been a reduction in the amount of contact, and this was particularly apparent for those who experienced a change of social worker over lockdown and did not have an opportunity to meet them. Experiences of home-schooling were also mixed, with some young people thriving due to the flexibility and one-to-one support from carers, and others struggling with the lack of routine and reduction in social contact. Carers also raised how the individualised attention supported some young people’s learning; however, some foster carers commented on the considerable responsibility and time commitments of home-schooling. The wellbeing of children and young people varied considerably over lockdown, with some enjoying the experience and increased free time, and others missing the structure of school and relationships with friends and family.

Last updated on hub: 08 December 2020

Impact of COVID-19 on care and contact: experiences in the first COVID-19 lockdown on foster carers and young people in their care

Research In Practice: Dartington

This report summarises the findings from three questionnaires, which were designed to explore the impact of lockdown on young people in and leaving care. The three questionnaires were designed for: young people in care or with care experience; carers; and birth parents. Many young people and carers described how lockdown had given them more quality time to spend with families or those they live with; over 90% of those in foster care reported relationships at home had improved or stayed the same during lockdown. There were mixed views on virtual family time. While some felt it was a more flexible and convenient option which gave young people more control over the situation, the lack of physical contact was an issue for some, as was the additional responsibility this placed on foster carers to help manage family time. In respect of virtual contact with social workers / personal advisors, over 80% of young people and 90% of carers felt this was the same or better than their contact prior to lockdown, citing increased availability and convenience. However, some people felt there had been a reduction in the amount of contact, and this was particularly apparent for those who experienced a change of social worker over lockdown and did not have an opportunity to meet them. Experiences of home-schooling were also mixed, with some young people thriving due to the flexibility and one-to-one support from carers, and others struggling with the lack of routine and reduction in social contact. Carers also raised how the individualised attention supported some young people’s learning; however, some foster carers commented on the considerable responsibility and time commitments of home-schooling. The wellbeing of children and young people varied considerably over lockdown, with some enjoying the experience and increased free time, and others missing the structure of school and relationships with friends and family.

Last updated on hub: 08 December 2020

Order by    Date Title