COVID-19 resources on Infection control

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Stopping movement of staff between care settings: response to consultation

Department of Health and Social Care

This document summarises the responses to that consultation regarding proposed new regulations to limit staff movement between care homes and other health and care settings and sets out the government’s response to the issues raised. The proposal the government consulted on was to: create a temporary requirement that CQC registered care home providers do not deploy staff to provide personal or nursing care if they are, or have in the previous 14 days, been carrying on a regulated activity in another health or social care setting (further details on which groups are excluded is set out in this document); provide a limited temporary exception to the requirement in order that care home providers can continue to ensure enough staff are available to care for service users safely. This would allow providers to use people who are also being deployed in another health or social care setting, but only for a reasonable period of time to allow the provider to make other arrangements to enable them to comply with the requirement. Overall, several respondents acknowledged the government’s imperative to do everything it can to minimise the risk of infection of COVID-19 and other viral illnesses in care homes. The majority of respondents (56%) believed that the proposed requirement had the potential to reduce staff movement, although around half of the respondents who expressed this (29% of all respondents) felt that changes to the proposals would be needed. Examples of concerns about the proposal included: confusion about the scope of the regulations and which staff and/or locations it would cover; the impact it could have on staffing levels and the impact on the provision of care to residents; the cost of implementing the proposed regulation.

Last updated on hub: 31 May 2021

Stories of shielding: life in the pandemic for those with health and care needs

National Voices

Brings together the voices and stories of people with long-term health conditions during COVID-19. The report is based on the submissions to the digital platform Our COVID Voices, which was created for people with health and care needs to share their experiences. The platform received 70 unfiltered views and stories from people at great risk of all the effects of the pandemic, including anxiety, uncertainty and changes to their care. But it goes much deeper, into their relationships, their jobs and dealing with the everyday aspects of life in the pandemic. This document collates quotes from these stories to provide an overview of the real-life experiences of individuals shielding.

Last updated on hub: 15 October 2020

Strengthening the health system response to COVID-19: preventing and managing the COVID-19 pandemic across long-term care services in the WHO European Region (May 29, 2020)

World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe

This technical guidance identifies ten policy objectives to prevent and manage COVID-19 infections in long-term care services. It includes proposed actions and examples from across Europe and aims to help decision-makers, policy-makers and national or regional health authorities as they seek ways to prevent and manage the COVID-19 pandemic in long-term care services. The focus is on older people above the age of 65 years who use long-term care services in their homes, day centres or residential homes and nursing homes. The 10 policy objectives cover: Prioritizing the maintenance of LTC services; Mobilizing additional funds; Implementing prevention and control standards; Implementing safety measures that recognise the mutual benefits of the safety of people receiving and providing LTC services; Prioritizing testing, tracing and monitoring the spread of COVID-19; Securing staff and resources; Scaling up support for family caregivers; Coordinate between services; Secure access to dignified palliative care services; and Prioritize the well-being of people receiving and providing LTC services.

Last updated on hub: 28 May 2020

Summary of guidance for visitors

Department of Health and Social Care

Summarises the government’s advice to support safe visiting: every care home resident will be able to nominate a single named visitor who will be able to enter the care home for regular visits; residents with the highest care needs will also be able to nominate an essential care giver; care homes can continue to offer visits to other friends or family members with arrangements such as outdoor visiting, substantial screens, visiting pods, or behind windows. [Last updated 21 June 2021]

Last updated on hub: 08 March 2021

Summary of international policy measures to limit impact of COVID19 on people who rely on the Long-Term Care sector

London School of Economics and Political Science

This working paper provides a summary of measures to limit impact of COVID19 on people who rely on the Long-Term Care sector, compiled from contributions from members of the International Long-Term Care Policy Network. The list of measures is not exhaustive, it only contains examples of measures that have been reported or identified by contributors to the website so far.

Last updated on hub: 28 May 2020

Supervision and social care practice in the time of COVID-19

Research In Practice: Dartington

A suite of resources to support supervision in the context of COVID-19. The pandemic, and consequent need for social distancing, have required a reorganisation of every aspect of social care practice, including supervision. The resources are intended to strengthen the effectiveness of remote supervision, building resilience, working with people who are experiencing grief and loss, as well as thinking about social work in the context of a crisis.

Last updated on hub: 23 July 2020

Supporting children and young people with SEND as schools and colleges prepare for wider opening

Department for Education

Risk assessment guidance for settings managing children and young people with an education, health and care (EHC) plan or complex needs during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, including special schools, specialist colleges, local authorities and any other settings managing children and young people with SEND. [Updated 24 July 2020]

Last updated on hub: 28 July 2020

Supporting individuals with intellectual and developmental disability during the first 100 days of the COVID‐19 outbreak in the USA

Journal of Intellectual Disability Research

Background: It is unknown how the novel Coronavirus SARS‐CoV‐2, the cause of the current acute respiratory illness COVID‐19 pandemic that has infected millions of people, affects people with intellectual and developmental disability (IDD). The aim of this study is to describe how individuals with IDD have been affected in the first 100 days of the COVID‐19 pandemic. Methods: Shortly after the first COVID‐19 case was reported in the USA, the organisation in this study, which provides continuous support for over 11 000 individuals with IDD, assembled an outbreak committee composed of senior leaders from across the health care organisation. The committee led the development and deployment of a comprehensive COVID‐19 prevention and suppression strategy, utilising current evidence‐based practice, while surveilling the global and local situation daily. This study implemented enhanced infection control procedures across 2400 homes, which were communicated to employees using multi‐faceted channels including an electronic resource library, mobile and web applications, paper postings in locations, live webinars and direct mail. Custom‐built software applications were used to track patient, client and employee cases and exposures, and this study leveraged current public health recommendations to identify cases and to suppress transmission, which included the use of personal protective equipment. A COVID‐19 case was defined as a positive nucleic acid test for SARS‐CoV‐2 RNA. Results: In the 100‐day period between 20 January 2020 and 30 April 2020, this study provided continuous support for 11 540 individuals with IDD. Sixty‐four per cent of the individuals were in residential, community settings, and 36% were in intermediate care facilities. The average age of the cohort was 46 ± 12 years, and 60% were male. One hundred twenty‐two individuals with IDD were placed in quarantine for exhibiting symptoms and signs of acute infection such as fever or cough. Sixty‐six individuals tested positive for SARS‐CoV‐2, and their average age was 50. The positive individuals were located in 30 different homes (1.3% of total) across 14 states. Fifteen homes have had single cases, and 15 have had more than one case. Fifteen COVID‐19‐positive individuals were hospitalised. As of 30 April, seven of the individuals hospitalised have been discharged back to home and are recovering. Five remain hospitalised, with three improving and two remaining in intensive care and on mechanical ventilation. There have been three deaths. This study found that among COVID‐19‐positive individuals with IDD, a higher number of chronic medical conditions and male sex were characteristics associated with a greater likelihood of hospitalisation. Conclusions: In the first 100 days of the COVID‐19 outbreak in the USA, this study observed that people with IDD living in congregate care settings can benefit from a coordinated approach to infection control, case identification and cohorting, as evidenced by the low relative case rate reported. Male individuals with higher numbers of chronic medical conditions were more likely to be hospitalised, while most younger, less chronically ill individuals recovered spontaneously at home.

Last updated on hub: 19 October 2020

Supporting wellbeing of older people when shielding / isolating

Public Health Wales Observatory

This summary outlines action that the evidence suggests may help to support the mental wellbeing of older adults at this time. It is intended for organisations involved in supporting older people. Four systematic reviews were identified from a search of the literature conducted in June 2019. Most provided data from qualitative research and captured the perceptions of older people on quality of life, meaningful occupations and experience of technology. Reflecting on the findings from these reviews, the analysis suggests a number of actions for consideration by those involved in supporting older people. These actions focus on: maintaining autonomy and control; occupation and social interaction; access to the internet; and money and resources.

Last updated on hub: 16 November 2020

Surviving COVID-19: social work issues in a global pandemic (Child protection and welfare, and social care)

University of Stirling

This briefing provides advice for social workers working with children and families during this coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The briefing covers what is COVID-19 and its symptoms; what steps do World Health Organisation (WHO) and national and local health advisors advocate people follow in preparedness, mitigation and suppression strategies; how can social workers work with children and families during this pandemic; and how can social workers take care of themselves and others while performing their statutory duties. The briefing also covers how to uphold anti-oppressive practice, ethical behaviour and human rights, home visits and personal protection and protective equipment.

Last updated on hub: 15 June 2020

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