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All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 21 - 30 of 752

Delivering prevention in an ageing world: democratising access to prevention: consultation paper

HIMAWAN Arunima
2021

This consultation paper sets out the key criteria that will allow governments and healthcare systems to democratise access and deliver prevention. Prevention can substantially improve society’s health and wellbeing by reducing morbidity and increasing the number of years spent in good health; it provides value for money and returns on investment in both the short- and long-term, and contributes to the sustainability of our healthcare systems; it can benefit economies by helping people continue to work and consume in later life. However, for preventative services to fully deliver these benefits, we must ensure democracy of access. As it stands, we know that many preventative services don’t reach everyone equally. Lack of access to vital preventative services contributes to a widening of health inequalities. This has become even more apparent during the COVID-19 pandemic, which has served to further expose and amplify these inequalities. The document identifies five key criteria for democratising access to preventative healthcare: make prevention convenient; ensure that cost is no barrier; tailor prevention; improve health literacy through co-production; and address ageism. The paper offers examples of good practice by healthcare systems, private companies and third-sector organisations that have democratised access to prevention by using each of these criteria.

Better lives for older people: an evaluation of Octavia’s outreach, befriending and activities services

NEW PHILANTHROPY CAPITAL, OCTAVIA
2021

This is an abridged version of an evaluation of Octavia’s work to identify, document, and share learning about the impact of their outreach, one-to-one befriending, and group activity service. Octavia is a not-for-profit organisation that provides homes, support and care to older and vulnerable adults living in their homes and in the wider community. It offers three key services: outreach support – provides personal contact and practical help to isolated individuals, to combat loneliness and improve access to community and health services; one-to-one befriending – provides regular and on-going companionship, with weekly visits from trained and committed volunteer befrienders; and group activities – offers a range of group and social activities and events connecting people, promoting involvement, and fostering friendships. Key findings related to achieving Octavia’s social, emotional and health outcomes include: group activities seem to be especially useful for reducing service user feelings of loneliness and increasing their confidence (compared to one-to-one befriending or outreach support); outreach workers and one-to-one befrienders play a bigger role in supporting service users to access essential services; service users who had difficulties attending GP or hospital appointments reported the greatest improvements in their mental well-being and quality of life, self-care, confidence and physical health and independence; service users who had long-term mental health conditions reported the greatest improvements in their mental well-being and quality of life, feeling more socially connected, and improvements in their self-esteem; service users who were male reported the greatest improvements in their confidence and feeling more socially connected. Service users reported very high levels of overall satisfaction with the outreach, one-to-one befriending and activity service. The service received a 96% level of satisfaction, with equally high levels reported across all three service streams.

Better lives for older people: an evaluation of Octavia’s outreach, befriending and activities services for older people

MANNIX Matthew, PARKER Elizabeth
2021

An evaluation of Octavia’s work to identify, document, and share learning about the impact of their outreach, one-to-one befriending, and group activity service. Octavia is a not-for-profit organisation that provides homes, support and care to older and vulnerable adults living in their homes and in the wider community. It offers three key services: outreach support – provides personal contact and practical help to isolated individuals, to combat loneliness and improve access to community and health services; one-to-one befriending – provides regular and on-going companionship, with weekly visits from trained and committed volunteer befrienders; and group activities – offers a range of group and social activities and events connecting people, promoting involvement, and fostering friendships. Key findings related to achieving Octavia’s social, emotional and health outcomes include: group activities seem to be especially useful for reducing service user feelings of loneliness and increasing their confidence (compared to one-to-one befriending or outreach support); outreach workers and one-to-one befrienders play a bigger role in supporting service users to access essential services; service users who had difficulties attending GP or hospital appointments reported the greatest improvements in their mental well-being and quality of life, self-care, confidence and physical health and independence; service users who had long-term mental health conditions reported the greatest improvements in their mental well-being and quality of life, feeling more socially connected, and improvements in their self-esteem; service users who were male reported the greatest improvements in their confidence and feeling more socially connected. Service users reported very high levels of overall satisfaction with the outreach, one-to-one befriending and activity service. The service received a 96% level of satisfaction, with equally high levels reported across all three service streams.

A qualitative evidence review of space and place, intangible assets, and volunteering, and their contribution to the enhancement of wellbeing and/or alleviation of loneliness for adults across the lifecourse (16+ years) [...]

MANSFIELD Louise, et al
2020

A review of the evidence on volunteering, wellbeing and loneliness in participatory arts and sport/physical activity. For this report, 27 qualitative studies are synthesised. They indicate that the wellbeing benefits of volunteering in participatory arts and sport/physical activity are connected to three key themes: (i) giving and sharing skills, expertise and experience; (ii) creating places/spaces of security and trust; and (iii) providing opportunities for personal skill development. These themes point to the ways in which volunteering in participatory arts and sport can enhance wellbeing and/or alleviate feelings of loneliness. However, the evidence also suggests that volunteering can sometimes make people feel excluded. If volunteers are not given the necessary skills and support, it may leave them feeling worse. It can also be difficult to sustain beneficial effects when a volunteering programme comes to an end. Volunteers and people benefiting from volunteering activities include: those with mental health issues; the socioeconomically disadvantaged; those involved in outdoor environmental work; runners; and isolated and older adults. The sports and physical activities incorporate: walking and hiking in peer-led groups, skiing and horse riding, rugby, therapeutic horticulture and gardening, event volunteering, running, group exercise sessions, football, gym, tai chi, yoga, Zumba, table tennis and frisbee. The participatory arts activities include: creative arts, poetry, visual arts, singing, ceramics, theatre and storytelling, museum and heritage activities and knitting, sewing and crochet.

Participatory arts, sport, physical activity and loneliness: the role of volunteering

WHAT WORKS CENTRE FOR WELLBEING
2020

Key findings of a review of the evidence on volunteering, wellbeing and loneliness in participatory arts and sport/physical activity. For this review, 27 qualitative studies were analysed. They indicate that the wellbeing benefits of volunteering in participatory arts and sport/physical activity are connected to three key themes: (i) giving and sharing skills, expertise and experience; (ii) creating places/spaces of security and trust; and (iii) providing opportunities for personal skill development. These themes point to the ways in which volunteering in participatory arts and sport can enhance wellbeing and/or alleviate feelings of loneliness. Key messages for action include: volunteering has an important role to play in culture and sport policy and practice; develop collaborative partnerships, volunteer training and adequate resourcing; and offer volunteering that reflects diversity and develops inclusivity.

Older men at the margins: experiences of seeking social engagement and combating loneliness in later life: research findings

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH RESEARCH. School for Social Care Research
2020

Summarises findings of a study aimed to develop an in-depth understanding of how older men from marginalised and seldom heard groups sought to maintain social engagement and social participation in later life. This included their experiences of participation in group interventions targeted at reducing loneliness among older adults. A total of 111 men self-selected to take part in the study from five groups: (1) men who are single or living alone in urban areas; (2) men who are single or living alone in rural areas (i.e. towns, villages, hamlets with less than 10,000 residents); (3) gay-identifying men who are single or living alone; (4) men with hearing loss; and (5) men who are carers for significant others. Participants ranged in ages from 65–95 years and the mean age was 76. Key findings include: the effects of loneliness were often pronounced and had a range of negative impacts on day-to-day life; experiences differed by sexuality, hearing loss and caring responsibility; feeling 'left out of things', socially excluded, overlooked, cut-off were commonly expressed emotions; men did not always have people to confide their feelings to – or felt reticent about doing so; men valued groups that tried to increase social opportunities and interaction; mixed aged groups were strongly preferred, as they did not want to be siloed in groups for ‘old people’; there were notable barriers and challenges in accessing and participating in groups; social care practitioners need to be aware of the life events associated with loneliness and how these trigger points impact on wellbeing and social engagement with others.

Good Friends for All: age-friendly and inclusive volunteering grant programme evaluation

CENTRE FOR AGEING BETTER
2021

An evaluation of the Good Friends for All project, which works by matching together people self-referred or referred into the service with a volunteer “Good Friend” based on their needs and interests who can help with a range of issues. The Good Friends for All project builds on, and learns from, a similar scheme in Darlington and involvement in the Centre for Ageing Better’s original community research and review into age-friendly and inclusive volunteering. Good Friends for All appears to have a positive impact on the people supported and the volunteers themselves, helping improve social connections, health and well-being and generating a sense of purpose and value. The scheme has been enhanced through efforts to address barriers and embed age-friendly and inclusive volunteering principles and practice, such as trying to increase the support available to volunteers and make volunteering more flexible, so that it suits different circumstances. The project has highlighted the challenges of attracting new volunteers, although this has changed somewhat following the growth in volunteer numbers during the COVID-19 pandemic. The project has also highlighted the challenges of making changes to longstanding, pre-existing services and models (the project has adopted an existing Good Friends scheme established in a neighbouring area, while it has sought to adapt an existing, long-established befriending scheme in North Craven). Such situations may require a longer-term, gradual, cultural-change approach to embedding age-friendly and inclusive principles and practice in such instances where ingrained systems, processes and attitudes exist, and where working with new partners and establishing new relationships is required. The project is committed to continuing, developing and growing the scheme using other funding sources. It is also intending to continue promoting and embedding age-friendly and inclusive volunteering principles and practice within the scheme, the local Age UK partners and amongst other local organisations.

Social isolation and psychological distress among older adults related to COVID-19: a narrative review of remotely-delivered interventions and recommendations

GORENKO Julie A., et al
2021

The COVID-19 pandemic is associated with several short- and long-term negative impacts on the well-being of older adults. Physical distancing recommendations to reduce transmission of the SARS-CoV2-19 virus increase the risk of social isolation and loneliness, which are associated with negative outcomes including anxiety, depression, cognitive decline, and mortality. Taken together, social isolation and additional psychological impacts of the pandemic (e.g., worry, grief) underscore the importance of intervention efforts to older adults. This narrative review draws upon a wide range of evidence to provide a comprehensive overview of appropriate remotely-delivered interventions for older adults that target loneliness and psychological symptoms. These include interventions delivered by a range of individuals (i.e., community members to mental health professionals), and interventions that vary by implementation (e.g., self-guided therapy, remotely-delivered interventions via telephone or video call). Recommendations to overcome barriers to implementation and delivery are provided, with consideration given to the different living situations.

Late Spring: age-friendly and inclusive volunteering grant programme evaluation

CENTRE FOR AGEING BETTER
2021

An evaluation of Late Spring, an established bereavement support project for people in later life to provide mutual support, help people remember there is still ‘life to live’ and ‘look to the future without forgetting’. The support groups run twice a month in community venues and are designed to provide space for those aged 60+ who have been bereaved. They come together in a relaxed, warm, friendly and safe environment ‘with others who understand’, as they begin to face the reality of life without their loved one. Groups are facilitated by a trained community worker, often supported by volunteers. These groups have a mixture of both restorative and informative sessions based around tea, coffee, cake and the occasional meal and activity. People attend for between 12–24 months, though some remain with the group as volunteers. At the start of this grant programme there were 18 groups involving approximately 250 people across Oxfordshire. The Late Spring project highlights the challenges of integrating age-friendly and inclusive volunteering within an existing, successful project, ensuring that it enhances rather than undermines the service, while embedding age-friendly and inclusive volunteering principles and overcomes the barriers. This model has helped increase awareness and interest in volunteering amongst Late Springers, as well as increase their confidence to volunteer. Consequently, it has supported some Late Springers into helping more or rekindled interest in volunteering, resulting in positive experiences. In the process, the approach has enhanced the Late Spring project and helped improve its outcomes. This has been achieved by helping Late Springers recover and look to the future, increasing their confidence, reducing isolation, promoting being active and improving well-being.

The experiences and needs of Asian older adults who are socially isolated and lonely: a qualitative systematic review

SHOREY Shefaly, CHAN Valerie
2021

Purpose: To examine the experiences and needs of Asian older adults who are socially isolated and lonely living in Asian and western countries. Materials and methods: Six databases were searched for qualitative studies from each database’s inception to December 2019. Qualitative data were meta-summarized and then meta-synthesized. Results: Fourteen studies were included in this review. Five themes emerged: (1) association with older adults’ well-being, (2) loss of social support, (3) dealing with social isolation and loneliness (4) unique experiences of Asian older adults in western countries, and (5) wish list of older adults. The older adults felt psychologically down and experienced a lack of social support from their family members. They coped using strategies such as religious reliance and social engagement with peers. Asian older adults in western countries faced cultural barriers and tried to form ethnic communities. The older adults wished for more community resources and care. Conclusion: There were multiple associations of social isolation and loneliness on the Asian older adults’ well-being and social support. Coping mechanisms such as acceptance and social engagement were adopted. They expressed support needs such as social programs and healthcare services. More geographically distributed studies are needed to gather a more comprehensive and causality-related perspectives of socially isolated and lonely older adults. Lay-led programs, technology, and active coping strategies are proposed and can be incorporated in healthcare services and social programs to assist these older adults.

Results 21 - 30 of 752

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News

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H4All wellbeing service Practice example about how H4All Wellbeing Service is using the Patient Activation Measure (PAM) tool

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Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

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Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia

KOMP

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