#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 41 - 50 of 752

What works in tackling social isolation of older people in Bangladeshi Communities: briefing

AMBITION FOR AGEING
2021

This briefing shares learning and recommendations about working effectively and sensitively with small tight-knit ethnic minority communities, and about risks and protection factors for social isolation. It is drawn from an Ambition for Ageing - funded British Red Cross project tackling social isolation of older people in Bangladeshi communities in Greater Manchester. The key learning from the project are: models that emphasise one to one work and connecting individuals to external agencies to reduce their isolation – like the Community Navigator model – may not be the most appropriate choice for tackling social isolation in these communities; creativity and being adaptable with delivery plans to work in a culturally sensitive way can support success in achieving project goals; traditional gender roles can increase risk and provide protection for social isolation for different people, and this needs to be accounted for when planning projects; co-design is essential to ensure projects are culturally aware, appropriate, and effective.

“Listen and then listen again”: prevention and promotion of independence for older adults

CARE INSPECTORATE WALES
2020

Explores the progress made by local authority social services and health boards in supporting older adults to be as independent as possible, in line with the Social Services and Well-being Act (Wales) 2014. The research looked at the experiences of people aged over 65 who had received support from social care and health services, focusing on these key themes: people – are their voices heard and do they have control; partnerships, integration and co-production – who is working together and who is designing support together; prevention – how are services stopping people from reaching crisis or from needing care and support; and well-being - what matters to people. The key findings are: People (voice and control) – almost all of the time, people were treated with dignity and respect by care staff who made a positive difference in their lives but more work is needed to make sure that carers have their voices heard; Well-being – the importance of helping older people to maintain their well-being was increasingly recognised as a positive way to promote independence, and an aspect of work many care staff found rewarding; Partnerships and integration – many people benefitted from positive relationships they developed with care staff who treated them as equals but leaders and manager need to develop a culture of sustainability, through working together and designing services together; Prevention – the duty to support people before they reach crisis is not consistently carried out across Wales.

Smart environments and social robots for age-friendly integrated care services

ANGHEL Ionut, et al
2020

The world is facing major societal challenges because of an aging population that is putting increasing pressure on the sustainability of care. While demand for care and social services is steadily increasing, the supply is constrained by the decreasing workforce. The development of smart, physical, social and age-friendly environments is identified by World Health Organization (WHO) as a key intervention point for enabling older adults, enabling them to remain as much possible in their residences, delay institutionalization, and ultimately, improve quality of life. This study surveyed smart environments, machine learning and robot assistive technologies that can offer support for the independent living of older adults and provide age-friendly care services. This study describes two examples of integrated care services that are using assistive technologies in innovative ways to assess and deliver of timely interventions for polypharmacy management and for social and cognitive activity support in older adults. This study describes the architectural views of these services, focusing on details about technology usage, end-user interaction flows and data models that are developed or enhanced to achieve the envisioned objective of healthier, safer, more independent and socially connected older people.

Interventions for reducing loneliness: an umbrella review of intervention studies

VERONESE Nicola, et al
2020

Loneliness is a common phenomenon associated with several negative health outcomes. Current knowledge regarding interventions for reducing loneliness in randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is conflicting. The aim of the present work is to provide an overview of interventions to reduce loneliness, using an umbrella review of previously published systematic reviews and meta‐analyses. The researchers searched major databases from database inception to 31 March 2020 for RCTs comparing active versus non‐active interventions for reducing loneliness. For each intervention, random‐effects summary effect size and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. For significant outcomes (p‐value < 0.05), the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) tool was used, grading the evidence from very low to high. From 211 studies initially evaluated, seven meta‐analyses for seven different types of interventions were included (median number of RCTs: 8; median number of participants: 600). Three interventions were statistically significant for reducing loneliness, that is, meditation/mindfulness, social cognitive training and social support. When applying GRADE criteria, meditation/mindfulness (mean difference, MD = −6.03; 95% CI: −9.33 to −2.73; very low strength of the evidence), social cognitive training (8 RCTs; SMD = −0.49; 95% CI: −0.84 to −0.13; very low strength of the evidence) and social support (9 RCTs; SMD = −0.13; 95% CI: −0.25 to −0.01; low strength of the evidence) significantly decreased the perception of loneliness. In conclusion, three intervention types may be utilised for reducing loneliness, but they are supported by a low/very low certainty of evidence indicating the need for future large‐scale RCTs to further investigate the efficacy of interventions for reducing loneliness.

Green health partnerships in Scotland; pathways for social prescribing and physical activity referral

MCHALE Sheona, et al
2020

Increased exposure to green space has many health benefits. Scottish Green Health Partnerships (GHPs) have established green health referral pathways to enable community-based interventions to contribute to primary prevention and the maintenance of health for those with established disease. This qualitative study included focus groups and semi-structured telephone interviews with a range of professionals involved in strategic planning for and the development and provision of green health interventions (n = 55). This study explored views about establishing GHPs. GHPs worked well, and green health was a good strategic fit with public health priorities. Interventions required embedding into core planning for health, local authority, social care and the third sector to ensure integration into non-medical prescribing models. There were concerns about sustainability and speed of change required for integration due to limited funding. Referral pathways were in the early development stages and intervention provision varied. Participants recognised challenges in addressing equity, developing green health messaging, volunteering capacity and providing evidence of success. Green health interventions have potential to integrate successfully with social prescribing and physical activity referral. Participants recommended GHPs engage political and health champions, embed green health in strategic planning, target mental health, develop simple, positively framed messaging, provide volunteer support and implement robust routine data collection to allow future examination of success.

A new deal for prevention

REFORM
2021

This Reformer Thoughts brings together experts from the scientific research community and the health care sector to discuss the benefits of a preventative approach to public health and the obstacles that stand in the way of its realisation. Conversations around preventative health have come to the fore during the COVID-19 pandemic. A spotlight has been placed on health inequalities and discussions on tackling the social determinants of ill health driven forward. Contents include: prioritising prevention and patient care during the COVID-19 crisis; prevention research – creating a healthier population and reducing health inequalities; we cannot become the victims of our success on HIV testing; how can screening programmes support the prevention and elimination of disease; cancer care, inequalities and prevention; how a world leading deal is helping prevent thousands of deaths from Hepatitis C.

The multiple conditions guidebook – one year on

TASKFORCE ON MULTIPLE CONDITIONS
2020

This report revisits seven of the case studies featured in The Multiple Conditions Guidebook to find out how things are progressing in the year since their original publication. Conversations detailing the impact of Covid-19 on people with multiple conditions, and the practitioners and services supporting them, are set out in this report with case study updates from the Black Country (employment support), British Lung Foundation (peer support groups), Cornwall (self-management), Gateshead (GP health reviews), Luton (specialist exercise trainers), Southwark (social prescribing) and Yorkshire (medication reviews). Across all the case studies revisited the Taskforce heard how: there is fear and anxiety from the increased risk to life from the virus for people with pre-existing health conditions and for some a sense that these health conditions mean their lives are less valuable in the face of Covid-19; the restrictions in place to keep people safe mean that people’s health conditions are, more than ever, affecting their ability to go about their life as normal; the disruption to the health and care services that many rely on to keep well not only causes stress and worry but also a deterioration in people’s health.

A glass half-full: 10 years on review

FOOT Jane, et al
2020

The publication of ‘A glass half-full’ in 2010 was timely, increasing awareness and deepening debates about how asset-based approaches could be most successfully applied in the UK. The chapters in this ten-year anniversary publication collectively provide policy and practice insights from what we have learned since that time; what challenges remain; and what are the current opportunities to be taken to ensure the potential of asset-based approaches is sustained. The chapters are organised into four themes: policy and structural issues; implementation and organisational change; challenges and critiques; and leadership. Together they reflect the notion that asset-based working needs to be considered at all levels of the system and in a multi-disciplinary way to be successful. Key messages include: asset-based working needs to be considered at all levels of the system and in a multidisciplinary way to be successful; they seek to enhance people’s ability to identify and use their own health resources; asset-based working should not be seen as competition to a deficit approach – a focus on deficits like disease should not be abandoned; learning from practice and sharing experience of what facilitates and hinders success is critical to our ability advance both the conceptual understanding and practical know-how of the asset-approach; policy makers need ensure the necessary supportive environments are in place to ensure success; those adopting asset-based approaches need to be continually reflective and recognise the challenges inherent in remaining true to the values of community control; politicians and senior management should use opportunities, such as financial challenges and devolution, to fundamentally re-think how they could create a new relationship with residents and communities to bring about sustainable public service reform.

Ever more needed? The role of the Leeds Neighbourhood Networks during the COVID-19 pandemic

DAYSON Chris, et al
2020

This report draws on the findings of a ‘real time evaluation’ (RTE) of the Leeds Neighbourhood Networks (LNNs) during the pandemic, as a way to understand and share learning about their response. The LNNs aim to support older people to live independently and participate in their communities as they grow older, through a range of activities and services that are provided at a neighbourhood level. The networks have developed over the past 30 years and there are now 37 of them covering the whole city of Leeds. The form, function, activities and services of the networks are diverse, but they share some key characteristics, such as running with the involvement of older people. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic there was a city-wide ambition for a symbiotic relationship between the LNNs and the health and care sector. This was linked the city’s strategic vision to make Leeds the ‘best city in the UK to grow old in’ and recognition of the need for a ‘left shift’ of resources toward prevention and the development community-based resources and assets. Although the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic meant that this progressive policy agenda was placed on hold out of necessity as city partners focussed on addressing the acute needs brought about by the crisis, the pandemic also provided an opportunity for the LNNs to demonstrate their value by being part of this response at a city and neighbourhood level.

Strengths, assets and place - the emergence of Local Area Coordination initiatives in England and Wales

LUNT Neil, BAINBRIDGE Laura, RIPPON Simon
2020

Summary: Local Area Coordination is an approach that emerged during the 1980s and 1990s to support individuals with learning disabilities in rural and metropolitan Western Australia. Offering direct family support, signposting and networking it aimed to improve access to services and promote social inclusion. It leveraged community resources and sought broader transformation through local collaborations and service redesign, as underpinned by a strengths-based philosophy. Scotland introduced a similar model of delivery from the early 2000s for learning disability support. Since 2010, a number of English and Welsh Local Authorities have introduced Local Area Coordination, and in doing so have expanded its support eligibility criteria to include those considered ‘vulnerable’ due to age, frailty, disability, mental health issues and housing precariousness. Findings: This article provides the first review of developments in England and Wales. Drawing upon published evaluation studies it reflects on Local Area Coordination implementation; reviews the existing evidence base and challenges surrounding data collection; and discusses the competing logic of Local Area Coordination in its aim of supporting individual and community improvement of health outcomes and well-being, and of furthering local government civic engagement and participation. Applications: This article points to the challenges and opportunities of implementing such a strength-, assets- and placed-based initiatives within Local Authority social service settings. Embedding Local Area Coordination within Local Authority settings requires skilled political and policy leadership. It balances emerging individual outcomes – health and well-being – with the civic mission (values, control and coproduction), and avoids one being subverted to the other.

Results 41 - 50 of 752

#EXCLUDE#
News

Prevention in social care

Prevention in social care What it means, the policy context, role for commissioners and practitioners and the evidence base.

H4All wellbeing service

H4All wellbeing service Practice example about how H4All Wellbeing Service is using the Patient Activation Measure (PAM) tool

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families
View more: News
Related SCIE content
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#