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Results for 'reablement'

Results 11 - 20 of 22

Review of integrated care: focus on falls

HEALTHCARE INSPECTORATE WALES
2019

Based on a review of integrated care for older people who are at risk of experiencing a fall in Wales, this report highlights learning for staff and for health and social care managers. It focuses on services to help people avoid a fall and how to support people who have had a fall, providing examples of desirable and undesirable pathways through the health and care system. It focuses on the three areas: prevention of falls and promotion of independence, for people living in their own home or in a care home; response to falls when they happen in the community, either for someone living at home or in a care home; and following attendance at hospital due to a fall. It also highlights key themes identified from the review and how the affected service users, service providers and commissioners. The review identified examples of good practice but also found a lack of co-ordination and communication between health, social care and voluntary services could often be a barrier to delivering good quality care. The report has been informed by evidence from six individual falls services, the views of staff and older people. It makes eight recommendations for the Welsh Government, health boards and local authorities. The include a National Falls Framework for Wales, to standardise the approach to preventing, treating and reabling older people who are at risk of falling or have already fallen The report will be relevant for service providers, commissioners and service users.

Physical activity programs for older people in the community receiving home care services: systematic review and meta-analysis

BURTON Elissa, et al
2019

The proportion of older adults is increasing around the world and most wish to live in their home until they die. To achieve this, many will require services in the home to remain living independently. To maintain function (ie, strength, balance, and endurance), physical activity needs to be undertaken on a regular basis, and is essential as a person ages. Unfortunately, as people age there is a tendency to reduce activity levels, which often leads to loss of function and frailty, and the need for home care services. This updated systematic review includes a mix of study methodologies and meta-analysis, and investigated the effectiveness of physical activity/exercise interventions for older adults receiving home care services. Eighteen studies including ten randomized controlled trials meeting the selection criteria were identified. Many of the studies were multi-factorial interventions with the majority reporting aims beyond solely trying to improve the physical function of home care clients. The meta-analysis showed limited evidence for effectiveness of physical activity for older adults receiving home care services. Future exercise/physical activity studies working with home care populations should consider focusing solely on physical improvements, and need to include a process evaluation of the intervention to gain a better understanding of the association between adherence to the exercise program and other factors influencing effectiveness.

Intermediate Care in Cookson's Nursing Home

Somerset Care and Yeovil District Hospital

Cookson’s Court nursing home was opened by Somerset Care in September 2015 with one floor of the new facility reserved solely for the use of the company’s new intermediate care/reablement service, delivered in collaboration with Yeovil District Hospital. “There are no words to express my gratitude, thank you with all my heart. I’ve been born again.” (Service user feedback). In part a response to poor delayed discharge performance in the Somerset area, the collaboration aims to: improve patient flow at Yeovil District Hospital and reduce lengths of stay; provide a reablement focused environment; and improve clinical outcomes and reduce costs.

Support at Home

British Red Cross

British Red Cross (BRC) Support at Home services offer short-term practical and emotional support at home to help people regain their independence following a stay in hospital. Evaluations of Red Cross preventative services have found that these services improved the quality of life for people who use services, contributed to cost savings and a reduction in use of formal/informal care.

The role of housing in effective hospital discharge

SKILLS FOR CARE, CHARTERED INSTITUTE OF HOUSING
2017

A collection of case studies from a wide range of housing providers, highlighting the role they can play in developing hospital discharge services. The case studies demonstrate the development of effective partnerships to meet hospital discharge needs, how these partnerships can help meet partners’ targets, and the workforce skills required to ensure effective services. Key learning points from the case studies include recognising and understanding different working cultures; building lasting relationships; effective and safe communication of information between agencies; developing sustainable and long term provision; and building a person centred solution. The publication will be particularly useful for social care and health commissioners, providers of housing and support and workforce development leads.

The cost effectiveness of homecare re-ablement: a discussion paper to explore the conclusions that can be drawn from the body of evidence

GERALD PILKINGTON ASSOCIATES
2011

The report ‘Homecare Re-ablement Prospective Longitudinal Study Final Report’ (Dec 2010) commissioned by the Department of Health’s Care Services Efficiency Delivery programme (CSED) has provided further insight and understanding about the nature and beneficial impacts of homecare re-ablement. However, some of the report content has resulted in a lack of clarity. The aim of this paper is to set out some of the background to the report and provide clarity on the learnings that can be gained with regard to the cost effectiveness of homecare re-ablement services. Contrary to impressions set out in various articles, the report does not indicate that homecare re-ablement as an approach has little financial benefits for a council. What it does illustrate is that councils should undertake a baseline exercise to establish an understanding of the local position and then to operationally performance manage their service to ensure that it is and remains cost effective whilst maximising the benefits of independence for as large a number of people as possible.

Community services: what do we know about quality? Briefing

O'DOWD Nora Cooke, DORNING Holly
2017

This briefing looks at trends in national measures in English community trusts to try to gain a view of quality in community services more generally. The analysis examines trends in routinely collected national quality measures in 18 community trusts in England, which account for a quarter of all community health services delivered in the NHS. Some of the key findings are: care in community trusts was predominantly delivered by professionally qualified clinical staff such as community health nurses, allied health professionals and community health visitors – staff numbers in the 18 trusts stayed roughly stable between late 2013 and 2016, although demand has almost certainly increased; these staff were roughly as satisfied with their jobs as staff in all NHS trusts, although they were less likely to recommend their trust as a place to work; the median waiting time for an outpatient appointment was three days longer in the community than across all trusts in England; patients using services offered by community trusts would generally recommend them to a friend and were less likely to experience harm compared to those using services provided by non-community trusts. The briefing concludes that the difficulties experienced in gathering useful information on community services indicate that the national lack of community data needs to be resolved before questions of quality can be meaningfully answered.

Home from hospital: how housing services are relieving pressures on the NHS

COPEMAN Ian, EDWARDS Margaret, PORTEUS Jeremy, HOUSING LEARNING AND IMPROVEMENT NETWORK
2017

This report shows how housing services are helping to relieve pressure on the NHS by reducing delays in discharging people from hospital and preventing unnecessary hospital admissions. It features 12 case studies to show the positive impact these services have on people’s lives and the cost benefit to the NHS. The case studies highlight services that will benefit people most at risk of delayed discharge, such as older people, people with mental health problems and people experiencing homelessness. The case studies also demonstrate a diversity of housing and health services including: 'step down' bed services for people coming out of hospital who cannot return to their own home immediately; hospital discharge support and housing adaptation services to enable timely and appropriate transfers out of hospital and back to patients' existing homes; providing a new home for people whose existing home or lack of housing mean that they have nowhere suitable to be discharged to; and Home from Hospital services to keeping people well at home who would otherwise be at risk of being admitted or readmitted to hospital. The report also considers the impact and additional savings that could be made by housing providers if this work were to be scaled up.

Going home alone: counting the cost to older people and the NHS

ROYAL VOLUNTARY SERVICE
2014

Assesses the impact of home from hospital services, which focus on supporting older people in their homes following a stay in hospital and seek to reduce the likelihood that they will need to be readmitted to hospital. The report brings together the findings of a literature review (as well as discussions with relevant experts), the results of the survey of 401 people aged 75 or over who had spent at least one night in hospital on one or more occasions within the past five years, and the outputs from a cost-impact analysis using national data and results from the survey. It sets out the policy context in England, Scotland and Wales, with its focus on preventive care, better integration of health and care services, and on shifting care away from the hospital into homes and communities. It then discusses the demand drivers for these schemes, including the ageing population, the growth in hospital readmissions, and decreasing length of stay. The report examines the experiences of older people after leaving hospital, looking at admissions, discharge, need for support following discharge, and type and duration of support. It suggests that home from hospital schemes can help to improve the well-being of their users and to reduce social isolation and loneliness and the number of hospital readmissions, as well as demand for other health and care services. The results of the cost-impact analysis suggest that, were home from hospital schemes appropriately targeted and effective in addressing ‘excess admissions’, they may produce a saving for the NHS of £40.4m per year.

The economic impact of care in the home services: a report commissioned by the British Red Cross

DELOITTE
2012

This study estimates the economic benefits to commissioners of both health and social care across six British Red Cross schemes, two covering A&E hospital schemes, and four focused on community and individual resilience. Based on analysing these six schemes, BRC is found to be delivering substantial savings to health and social care commissioners, ranging from £168 to £704 per user relating to a rate of return between 40 to 280 per cent. Savings are realised through the prevention of hospital admission or reduced length of stay in hospital; reduced levels of hospital readmission; and preventing or minimising the use of expensive domiciliary and residential care. All the BRC schemes across the UK are estimated to have the potential to save commissioners £8m. This saving implies an overall return of 149 per cent on commissioner expenditure, suggesting that these schemes deliver material benefits and form a crucial element of care in the UK. In addition to savings there are a number of further benefits the schemes deliver, including service user benefits, signposting and assistance with access to additional services, reduction of social isolation and greater independence and wellbeing through the use of volunteers.

Results 11 - 20 of 22

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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