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All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 1 - 10 of 636

Engaging with the arts to improve health and wellbeing in social care settings

WELSH NHS CONFEDERATION
2020

This briefing, prepared for the Cross-Party Group on Arts and Health, provides innovative examples of arts-based activities which are being delivered in social care settings across Wales to improve people’s physical and mental wellbeing. They include Live Music Now which supports professional musicians to deliver evidence-based music workshops in care homes; cARTrefu, a project from Age Cymru to improve access to quality arts experiences for older people in residential care homes project; and Bangor University's Dementia and Imagination.

Reducing emergency hospital admissions: a population health complex intervention of an enhanced model of primary care and compassionate communities

ABEL Julian, et al
2018

Background: Reducing emergency admissions to hospital has been a cornerstone of healthcare policy. Little evidence exists to show that systematic interventions across a population have achieved this aim. The authors report the impact of a complex intervention over a 44-month period in Frome, Somerset, on unplanned admissions to hospital. Aim: To evaluate a population health complex intervention of an enhanced model of primary care and compassionate communities on population health improvement and reduction of emergency admissions to hospital. Design and setting: A cohort retrospective study of a complex intervention on all emergency admissions in Frome Medical Practice, Somerset, compared with the remainder of Somerset, from April 2013 to December 2017. Method: Patients were identified using broad criteria, including anyone giving cause for concern. Patient-centred goal setting and care planning combined with a compassionate community social approach was implemented broadly across the population of Frome. Results: There was a progressive reduction, by 7.9 cases per quarter (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.8 to 13.1, P = 0.006), in unplanned hospital admissions across the whole population of Frome during the study period from April 2013 to December 2017, a decrease of 14.0%. At the same time, there was a 28.5% increase in admissions per quarter within Somerset, with a rise in the number of unplanned admissions of 236 per quarter (95% CI = 152 to 320, P<0.001). Conclusion The complex intervention in Frome was associated with highly significant reductions in unplanned admissions to hospital, with a decrease in healthcare costs across the whole population of Frome.

Perceptions of older people in Ireland and Australia about the use of technology to address falls prevention

MACKENZIE Lynette, CLIFFORD Amanda
2020

Falls are common events with serious consequences for older people. With an ageing population and increasing health-care costs, information and communication technologies (ICT) will have a potential role in future health-care delivery. However, research on technology acceptance in health care for older people is limited and its application to falls prevention is unknown. The aims of this study were to explore and describe the perceptions of community-dwelling Australian and Irish older people about their current use of technology, and the potential use of technology for falls prevention. Qualitative data were collected from three focus groups conducted in and around Limerick in Ireland, and three in the Sydney area, Australia. A total of 35 older people participated. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Four themes emerged from the data: (a) perceptions of vulnerability to falls, (b) preferences for exercise interventions, (c) participation in and ownership of technology, and (d) perceptions about applications of technology for falls prevention. As the use of technology is an instrumental activity of daily living, health professionals need to assess the capacity of older people to adopt these technologies, and provide falls prevention interventions to accommodate the technology skills of older people. Some participants were reluctant to embrace technology and barriers to the effective use of technology to assist in preventing falls may conflict with future health service trends.

Connecting communities: a strategy for tackling loneliness and social isolation

WALES. Welsh Government
2020

The young person's and community version of the Welsh Government strategy to tackle loneliness and social isolation. It outlines the Government's plan to tackle loneliness and social isolation and build a more connected society. It covers four priority areas: providing more opportunities for people to connect; providing good quality transport, community spaces and internet that help people connect; cohesive and supportive communities; and raising awareness of loneliness and social isolation. The strategy will be supported by funding over three years to support community-based organisations to deliver and test innovative approaches to tackling loneliness and social isolation.

The role and principles of reablement

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2020

This briefing provides an overview of the role and principles of reablement in the social care sector. It describes the different models used to deliver reablement, illustrating the shift from traditional home care towards personalised, outcome-focused care. Reablement is a strengths-based, person-centred approach that promotes and maximises independence and wellbeing. The briefing also outlines elements of effective reablement, which include assessment and goal setting, and managing risk and choice. It is designed for those working in reablement or commissioning it, but may also be useful to carers and people receiving reablement.

Handyperson services: defining the added value

FOUNDATIONS
2020

This report highlights the role of Handyperson Services in keeping people safe and healthy in their own homes, which can include repairs, home safety checks and home adaptations. It looks at some of the main improvements services can carry out and includes examples of services that provide added value. These include: Middlesbrough Staying Put, County Durham Handyperson Service and Manchester Care & Repair. Figures from a sample survey completed by 78 local authorities in England show that over half of local authorities either provide or commission handyperson services, with 45 percent providing services that aid timely discharge from hospital. The report concludes that the inclusion of Disabled Facilities Grant in the Better Care Fund provides a mechanism to improve the commissioning and targeting of Handyperson Services.

Social prescribing evidence map: summary report

PRICE Sian, HOOKWAY Amy, KING Sian
2017

Summary findings from an evidence mapping to share evidence on the effectiveness and practice of social prescribing to improve the health and well-being of individuals with social, emotional or practical needs. Sixty-two sources met the inclusion criteria for the evidence map. Two main types of social prescribing were identified. Those targeting psychosocial needs and those intended for people who are sedentary and/or overweight or obese. In total six types of social prescribing initiative are described: link worker programmes (schemes linking people to a facilitator who assessed them and referred them on to community support); community arts programmes; a horticultural programme; exercise referral schemes; commercial weight loss programmes and referral to welfare rights advice. The evidence mapping aims to support professionals looking to implement social prescribing interventions within primary and community care settings across Wales

Quality and cost-effectiveness in long-term care and dependency prevention: the English policy landscape. CEQUA report

MARCZAK Joanna, FERNANDEZ Jose-Luis, WITTENBERG Raphael
2017

This report summarises policy developments in England in relation to quality and cost-effectiveness and dependency prevention in long-term care. These policy aims focus on maximising the cost-effectiveness of the social care system, so that service users’ and carers’ quality of life is maximised within available resources. The report provides an overview of the long-term care system in England. It then reviews key recent policy developments in four areas: reducing dependency cost-effectively; strategies for maximising care coordination; supporting unpaid carers; and use of innovative care models, with a focus on technological solutions and personalisation. An appendix lists key features of the Care Act 2014 and the Better Care Fund relevant to prevention.

Psychological benefits of attending the theatre associated with positive affect and well-being for subscribers over age 60

MEEKS Suzanne, VANDENBROUCKE Russell J., SHRYOCK S. Kelly
2020

Objectives: Although late adulthood may be a time of greater well-being, optimal aging still characterizes a minority of older adults. Understanding how individuals achieve well-being across adulthood is important for intervention and social policy. This study focused on how attending live theatre might enhance the well-being of a sample of 53 season ticket holders aged 60 and older. Based on a previously tested conceptual framework, we hypothesized that post-performance reports of social-cognitive experience while at the play would predict post-performance positive affect, which in turn would predict well-being. Method: The sample was a subset of volunteers from a large survey study of theatre ticket purchasers. They completed baseline and two-year follow-up measures of well-being, and questionnaires immediately after attending seven plays across two seasons: measures of social engagement, belonging, flow, positive affect, and their reactions to the plays. Results: This study found that sense of belonging, social engagement, and flow were associated with positive affect after performances, as hypothesized. This study also found that the cumulative positive affect experienced after plays in the two seasons predicted change in well-being between baseline and follow-up. Conclusion: The findings suggest that attending performances is a combined social, cognitive, and affective experience that transcends entertainment. Future research might investigate whether the psychological benefit model assessed in this study will generalize to other leisure activities that create similar engagement. The findings have implications for individuals seeking to promote their own well-being, and, possibly more importantly, for policies that support enriching cultural opportunities, particularly in the arts.

The contribution of community singing groups to the well-being of older people: participant perspectives from the United Kingdom

SKINGLEY Ann, MARTIN Anne, CLIFT Stephen
2016

Current evidence suggests that participatory arts activities, and particularly group singing, may contribute to the well-being of older people. However, there is currently a paucity of prospective research from the participant perspective. This qualitative study nested within a randomized controlled trial aimed to assess participants’ perspectives of the acceptability and effect on health and well-being of a community singing program for older people. Volunteers recruited to the intervention arm (n = 131) were invited to write comments on their experiences over three data collection points of a 14-week singing program. A subsample (n = 19) participated in a retrospective semi-structured interview. Data were subjected to content and thematic analysis. Comments and interviews from 128 individuals suggested that the singing groups led to specific, incremental benefits to physical, psychological, social, and community well-being. Benefits tended to tail off after the program ended. Suggestions were made for the future running of such groups.

Results 1 - 10 of 636

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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