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Results 1 - 10 of 815

Creative drama and storytelling in dementia care: information for practitioners

BOURNEMOUTH UNIVERSITY. Ageing and Dementia Research Centre
2020

This booklet provides an overview of how creative drama and storytelling are being used within the dementia care field and the benefits they may have for the well-being of people living with dementia and their care partners. It draws on theoretical understandings of ‘social inclusion’ to illustrate how researchers and practitioners across the globe are using these creative initiatives to promote this important facet for people affected by dementia. The booklet is aimed at dementia practitioners who are currently using drama and storytelling within their practice, or have an interest in doing so in the future. It is divided into four chapters. The first provides an overview of dementia and the current global political focus on supporting people to live well with the condition; paying particular attention to the social inclusion agenda and developing dementia-friendly communities. This provides the theoretical and practical context for the second chapter, where, drawing from the literature review, the use of creative drama and storytelling within the dementia care field will be discussed. The information included in this chapter will focus on where these initiatives are currently being employed, how they are being used, as well as the benefits for people with dementia and the wider social inclusion agenda. The third chapter provides an overview, and examples of creative drama and storytelling initiatives within each of the partner countries, drawing from the interview data. The final chapter draws comparisons across the ERASMUS partner countries and summarises the information contained throughout the booklet. Based on these conclusions, it then outlines recommendations for policy and practice within this field.

Understanding and addressing inequalities in physical activity: evidence-based guidance for commissioners

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2021

This report presents the findings of a study to further understand levels of inequalities in physical activity across and within protected characteristic groups. The study used 3 data sets; a realist review, a quantitative analysis of Sport England’s Active Lives Survey (2015-2019), and qualitative research with practitioners delivering physical interventions to communities with protected characteristics. The results identified a range of inequalities in individual’s physical activity levels from different protected characteristic groups and therefore changes are needed immediately to reverse these. Even before the COVID-19 restrictions, physical inactivity had been increasing and this is particularly the case for women. However, there were statistically significant positive improvements in physical activity for older adults. Other protected characteristics and showed some improvements in activity, however, these were not statistically significant. Three major themes have been identified for commissioners to consider as actions to reduce inequalities in physical activity: enablers, barriers and identifying opportunity; community consultation, engagement, and partnership; and holistic approach for protected characteristics and intersectionality. The study has highlighted urgent action which is needed to ensure the physical activity workforce is diversely represented. Solutions should be sought in partnership with communities so that individuals can take ownership of what is being delivered. Interventions should be fluid to meet practical, environmental, social, and psychological individual needs; and aligned with understanding of demographic data to ensure intervention design is targeted and in direct consultation with the community to ensure interventions are needs driven.

Music social prescriptions for people living with dementia: a guide for link workers on how to include music when supporting people living with dementia, and their carers

MUSIC FOR DEMENTIA
2021

Aimed a link workers, this guide explores the benefits of a musical approach for people living with dementia, including how to use music as part of a social prescription. Music is a universal experience that people living with dementia can enjoy and experience at any time and throughout their journey with dementia. It can also be a specific activity or a bespoke intervention to meet particular needs. The guide explains how link workers can assess music needs and signpost people to music-based activities and services. While it is primarily written for link workers, it will also provide an insight into the subject for people who are assigned a link worker, as well as their carers and family members. The guide includes a wealth of information, including: details of the benefits of music for people living with dementia; musical social prescriptions; how to have a conversation about music; music in care homes; music in social work care plans; and how to involve family and friends.

Behavioural interventions delivered through interactive social media for health behaviour change, health outcomes, and health equity in the adult population (Review)

PETKOVIC Jennifer, et al
2021

Background: Social networking platforms offer a wide reach for public health interventions allowing communication with broad audiences using tools that are generally free and straightforward to use and may be combined with other components, such as public health policies. We define interactive social media as activities, practices, or behaviours among communities of people who have gathered online to interactively share information, knowledge, and opinions. Objectives: We aimed to assess the effectiveness of interactive social media interventions, in which adults are able to communicate directly with each other, on changing health behaviours, body functions, psychological health, well‐being, and adverse effects. Our secondary objective was to assess the effects of these interventions on the health of populations who experience health inequity as defined by PROGRESS‐Plus. We assessed whether there is evidence about PROGRESS‐Plus populations being included in studies and whether results are analysed across any of these characteristics. Search methods: We searched CENTRAL, CINAHL, Embase, MEDLINE (including trial registries) and PsycINFO. We used Google, Web of Science, and relevant web sites to identify additional studies and searched reference lists of included studies. We searched for published and unpublished studies from 2001 until June 1, 2020. We did not limit results by language. […] Authors' conclusions: This review combined data for a variety of outcomes and found that social media interventions that aim to increase physical activity may be effective and social media interventions may improve well‐being. While we assessed many other outcomes, there were too few studies to compare or, where there were studies, the evidence was uncertain. None of our included studies reported adverse effects related to the social media component of the intervention. Future studies should assess adverse events related to the interactive social media component and should report on population characteristics to increase our understanding of the potential effect of these interventions on reducing health inequities.

Must Know: loneliness: is your council actively tackling loneliness?

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2021

The purpose of this guide is help local authorities assess whether they are actively tackling loneliness. Tackling loneliness is a preventative measure that improves quality of life for individuals and reduces long-term costs for health and social care. Councils have a key role to play, using their knowledge of the local community to bring together partners and lead projects. The guide covers: the role of councils; loneliness as a growing national priority; the impact of COVID-19; identifying who is at risk; loneliness vs social isolation; strategy and partnership; what can be done; questions to consider; and resources for further information. Key messages include: loneliness is a public health priority, in a similar way to smoking and obesity, and affects people of all ages throughout the life course; the pandemic has made problems worse, with social networks disrupted and people, including children and young people, left isolated from family and friends during lockdowns; tackling loneliness is a preventative measure that improves quality of life for individuals and reduces long-term costs for health and social care; interventions are generally low-cost or cost-neutral and can provide a good return on investment; reducing loneliness requires all local partners (Councils, the NHS and the voluntary and community sector) to work together, adopting strategic and a system-wide approaches; a range of tools are available solutions – these include a Framework for interventions developed by the Campaign to End Loneliness, Age UK’s Loneliness heat map, Open referral data project and Reaching Out, a guide produced by the LGA and National Association of Local Councils; public health messages can help people realise the importance of building and maintaining social relationships; individuals and communities have a role in ensuring that people who are lonely and isolated are identified and included.

Combatting loneliness in York: case study

NHS CONFEDERATION
2022

This case study illustrates how asset-based community development has led to a significant reduction in non-clinical GP visits for loneliness and isolation in York. In 2015, GPs across York were reporting an increase in visits for non-clinical reasons, such as loneliness and isolation. The council decided to embed a health and wellbeing strategy at the heart of its delivery, which proactively engaged with health, voluntary, housing and other cross-sector teams to set up a system that would not only help to curtail levels of social isolation, but reduce GP visits for non-clinical reasons. This entailed setting up a local area coordination (LAC) team – a dozen place-based workers, to provide social support to residents and signpost to VCSO groups such as the good gym / home share/ walking groups; and a practitioners forum that, through regular meetings, brings together link workers across the sectors to share learning. Key benefits and outcomes included: GP visits for non-clinical reasons have reduced by a third; local area coordination (LAC) is recognised as having a £4 social return on investment for every £1 invested; LAC teams, which have increased in number from three (2017) to 11, can respond rapidly to crises within their own communities; between 76 per cent and 96 per cent of LAC work is diverting the need for services in people’s lives, through supporting non-service solutions instead.

Cultivating neighbourhoods that care: a manifesto for change

AGILE AGEING ALLIANCE
2022

Contributed to by age, health, care and design experts, policy makers and thought leaders, and drawing on perspectives and best practice from around the world, this report considers how the housing sector can combat loneliness and mental health issues – among younger and older populations – and ease the associated burden on health and social care systems. What is needed is a paradigm shift away from the disparate snakes and ladders style housing archetype; from starter, to family, to retirement homes. To smart building types, capable of adapting to accommodate a growing family, and then supporting an ageing one in later life, in smart technologically enabled multigenerational environments. This can only be achieved by taking account of the needs of the occupant and how they change over time. What’s missing is a commonly agreed view of “what good looks like”, making it hard for regional and local government, developers, and procurers of related products and services, to plan with any degree of confidence. This report contains a true wealth of insights, examples and recommendations designed to help shape a new International Standard – one that focuses on the creation of technically enabled multigenerational neighbourhoods. The development of this standard will enable advancement of a professional discourse on planning multigenerational neighbourhoods for the wellbeing of all, predicated on a set of guiding principles and a voluntary code of conduct.

Music in social care plans for people with dementia: a guide for social workers on how to embed music in personalised social care plans for people living with dementia, and their carers

MUSIC FOR DEMENTIA
2020

This guide explores the benefits of a musical approach for people living with dementia and how to include it in strengths-based assessments, including the role of link workers, family and friends in making this happen. The guide also explains how the music aligns with the ‘the wellbeing principle’ in The Care Act. The information is brought to life with case studies of how music has helped individuals and couples to enhance their quality of life in a variety of ways. It also includes a useful template of questions to ask during an assessment. Some of the many benefits of music included in the full guide are: enabling people living with dementia to be ‘seen as the person they are’ beyond their condition; engaging people positively across the spectrum of severity from diagnosis to end of life care; alleviating symptoms associated with dementia such as agitation, apathy and anxiety; re-energising people living with dementia as they experience and enjoy music from their past.

IMPACTAgewell: an integrated community development approach to improving the health and well-being of older people: sharing our learning: year 3 evaluation update

MID AND EAST ANTRIM AGEWELL PARTNERSHIP
2021

This report shares the learning from Year 3 of IMPACTAgewell, providing an evidence base for the benefits of supporting a community led integrated care approach. The aims of IMPACTAgewell are to improve the quality of life of older people by providing them with person centred services that will put their wellbeing and social needs on a par with their medical needs. Types of support include befriending, home security checks, handyperson services, energy efficient checks, benefits advice, community transport, health condition support groups, luncheon clubs and arts and history clubs. Assessing the impact of the programme, the evaluation examines in particular the fiscal return on investment; social return on investment; impacts and outcomes for older people; and invest to save return for community pharmacies. The evaluation estimates an FROI ratio of £1.51 : £1 – this means that for every £1 invested there has been at least £1.51 of savings generated in terms of unscheduled health and social care; an SROI ratio of £2.22 : £1 – this means that for every £1 invested, there has been at least £2.22 of a social return on investment when considering all service users, health care practitioners and carers; a community pharmacy ratio of £5.81: £1 – this means that for every £1 spent on community pharmacists within the project they delivered an invest to save return of £5.81.

IMPACTAgewell: an integrated community development approach to improving the health and well-being of older people: sharing our learning: year 4 evaluation update

MID AND EAST ANTRIM AGEWELL PARTNERSHIP
2021

This report shares the learning from Year 4 of IMPACTAgewell, providing an evidence base for the benefits of supporting a community led integrated care approach. The aims of IMPACTAgewell are to improve the quality of life of older people by providing them with person centred services that will put their wellbeing and social needs on a par with their medical needs. Types of support include befriending, home security checks, handyperson services, energy efficient checks, benefits advice, community transport, health condition support groups, luncheon clubs and arts and history clubs. Assessing the impact of the programme, the evaluation focuses in particular on fiscal return on investment; estimating a return on investment; social determinants of health; the Effect of the Covid-19 pandemic on the project; the changing community landscape; and Covid-19 and mental health. The evaluation estimates a fiscal return ratio of £2.38 : £1 – this means that for every £1 invested there has been at least £2.38 of savings generated in terms of unscheduled health and social care; a social return ratio of £2.22 : £1 – this means that for every £1 invested, there has been at least £2.22 of a social return on investment when considering all service users, health care practitioners and carers; and a community pharmacy ratio of £5.81: £1 – this means that for every £1 spent on community pharmacists within the project they delivered an invest to save return of £5.81.

Results 1 - 10 of 815

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News

Prevention in social care

Prevention in social care What it means, the policy context, role for commissioners and practitioners and the evidence base.

H4All wellbeing service

H4All wellbeing service Practice example about how H4All Wellbeing Service is using the Patient Activation Measure (PAM) tool

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families
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