#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 151 - 160 of 420

Social isolation in mental health: a conceptual and methodological review: scoping review 14

WANG Jingyi, et al
2016

Social isolation and related terms such as loneliness have been increasingly discussed in the field of mental health. However, there is a lack of conceptual clarity and consistency of measurement of these terms and understanding of overlaps. This report provides definitions and brief explanations of relevant conceptual terms from the literature, and proposed a conceptual model covering different aspects of social isolation. Aspects of social isolation covered include loneliness, social support, social network, social capital, confiding relationships, and alienation. The conceptual model contains five domains to include all elements of current conceptualisations. These five domains are: social network: quantity; social network: structure; social network: quality; appraisal of relationships: emotional; appraisal of relationships: resources. It then proposes well established measures in the field of mental health for each conceptual domains of social isolation. The authors discuss the strengths and limitations of the approach. The developed model can help researchers and intervention developers to identify expected outcomes of interventions precisely and choose the most appropriate measures for use in mental health settings.

The benefits of making a contribution to your community in later life

JONES Dan, YOUNG Aideen, REEDER Neil
2016

Reviews existing evidence on the benefits for older people of volunteering and making unpaid contributions to their communities in later life. The report covers ‘community contributions’ to refer to this whole spectrum of unpaid activity, including individual acts of neighbourliness, peer support, formal volunteering and involvement in civic participation. The report looks the state of the current evidence base; the main areas of benefit for volunteering in later life, who currently benefits from volunteering and in what circumstances. The review identifies good evidence that older people making community contributions can lead to benefits in: the quantity and quality of their social connections; an enhanced sense of purpose and self-esteem; and improved life satisfaction, happiness and wellbeing. The evidence was less clear on the impact on health, employment and social isolation. The review also found that people aged 50 with fewer social connections, lower levels of income and education, and poorer health may have the most to gain from helping others. However, the people most likely to volunteer are those who are already relatively wealthy, in good physical and mental health, and with high levels of wellbeing and social connections. The report makes recommendations for organisations, funders and commissioners working with older volunteers. These included: maximise the benefits of volunteering by focusing on engaging older people who are relatively less well connected, less wealthy and less healthy; avoid an over reliance on volunteering alone to tackle serious issues related to physical health, frailty, social isolation or employability; and ensure that older people engaged in volunteering have meaningful roles, with opportunities for social interaction.

Conceptualizing spirituality and religion for mental health practice: perspectives of consumers with serious mental illness

STARNINO Vincent R.
2016

Studies show that a high percentage of people with serious mental illness (SMI) draw upon spirituality and religion, resulting in a call for practitioners to incorporate these as part of recovery-related services. A challenge is that there are differing definitions of spirituality and religion presented in the literature which could lead to confusion in practice settings. A qualitative study was conducted with 18 participants with SMI. Findings reveal that there are important nuances, and much overlap, related to how people with psychiatric disabilities define and conceptualize spirituality and religion. Three major conceptualisations of spirituality and religion are presented. Insights from this study are relevant to practitioners interested in incorporating spirituality as part of recovery-oriented practice.

Trapped in a bubble: an investigation into triggers for loneliness in the UK

CO-OPERATIVES UK, BRITISH RED CROSS
2016

This research investigates potential triggers for loneliness across life stages, focusing on the causes, experiences and impacts of loneliness for six selected groups. It also looks at the support available for people experiencing loneliness, the services people would like, and how they would like that support to be delivered. The research focuses on: young new mums; individuals with mobility limitations; individuals with health issues; individuals who are recently divorced or separated; individuals living without children at home ('empty-nesters') and retirees; and the recently bereaved. It also draws on the views of experts and public opinion on loneliness gathered through a survey. The research found that the causes of loneliness of often complex, stemming from a combination of personal, community, and UK-wide factors. It also confirmed that people experiencing life events which can disrupt existing connections or change their role in society are at risk of loneliness. Other factors contributing to loneliness included: difficulty in accessing statutory services and support, the rapid disappearance of social spaces, and inadequate transport infrastructure. Loneliness can have physical, psychological and social impacts which can negatively impact on communities and people’s ability to connect. Experts recommend a combination of the following three models of support to tackle loneliness, depending on individual circumstances: preventative; responsive, which is shaped by the needs of those already experiencing loneliness and restorative, helping people to rebuild connections and prevent people slipping into chronic loneliness. Participants experiencing loneliness had a preference for face-to-face services, with digital services seen as important but supplementary. All those involved in the research supported the need for small, personal steps to help build community connectedness.

Testing promising approaches to reducing loneliness: results and learnings of Age UK's loneliness Pilot

AGE UK
2016

This report shares the results of Age UK’s loneliness pilot programme, which aimed to find out Age UK services could better reach older people experiencing loneliness, develop individually tailored solutions and help older people access activities and services within their community. Chapter one outlines origins of the programme, which involved eight local Age UKs in a 12 month pilot. Local services developed three common approaches: recruiting ‘eyes on the ground’ to identify older people experiencing, or at risk of, loneliness; developing co-operative networks with other agencies; and use of traditional befriending services. Chapter two highlights examples of services that local Age UKs are delivering and how the adoption of certain approaches improved their impact on lonely older people. Chapter three look at some of the impacts of the programme. It found that a large number of the older people supported during the programme experienced a reduction in their loneliness scores. This was especially true amongst older people who were often lonely. Some older people also identified feelings of increased independence, wellbeing and connectedness with people. Chapter four outlines the next steps for the Age UK programme.

Does integrated care reduce hospital activity for patients with chronic diseases? An umbrella review of systematic reviews

DAMERY Sarah, FLANAGAN Sarah, COMBES Gill
2016

Objective: To summarise the evidence regarding the effectiveness of integrated care interventions in reducing hospital activity. Design: Umbrella review of systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Setting: Interventions must have delivered care crossing the boundary between at least two health and/or social care settings. Participants: Adult patients with one or more chronic diseases. Data sources: MEDLINE, Embase, ASSIA, PsycINFO, HMIC, CINAHL, Cochrane Library (HTA database,DARE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews), EPPI-Centre, TRIP, HEED, manual screening of references. Outcome measures: Any measure of hospital admission or readmission, length of stay (LoS), accident and emergency use, healthcare costs. Results: 50 reviews were included. Interventions focused on case management (n=8), chronic care model (CCM) (n=9), discharge management (n=15), complex interventions (n=3), multidisciplinary teams (MDT) (n=10) and self-management (n=5). 29 reviews reported statistically significant improvements in at least one outcome. 11/21 reviews reported significantly reduced emergency admissions (15–50%); 11/24 showed significant reductions in all-cause (10–30%) or condition-specific (15–50%) readmissions; 9/16 reported LoS reductions of 1–7 days and 4/9 showed significantly lower A&E use (30–40%). 10/25 reviews reported significant cost reductions but provided little robust evidence. Effective interventions included discharge management with post-discharge support, MDT care with teams that include condition-specific expertise, specialist nurses and/or pharmacists and self-management as an adjunct to broader interventions. Interventions were most effective when targeting single conditions such as heart failure, and when care was provided in patients’ homes. Conclusions: Although all outcomes showed some significant reductions, and a number of potentially effective interventions were found, interventions rarely demonstrated unequivocally positive effects. Despite the centrality of integrated care to current policy, questions remain about whether the magnitude of potentially achievable gains is enough to satisfy national targets for reductions in hospital activity.

Integrated care for older people with frailty: innovative approaches in practice

ROYAL COLLEGE OF GENERAL PRACTITIONERS, BRITISH GERIATRICS SOCIETY
2016

Joint report showing how GPs and geriatricians are collaborating to design innovative schemes to improve the provision of integrated care for older people with frailty. The report highlights 13 case studies from across the UK which show what an integrated health and social care system looks like in practice and the positive impact it can have. The case studies are grouped into three areas: schemes to help older people remain active and independent, extending primary and community support to provide better services in the community, and integrated care to support patients in hospital. The examples cover a range of locations across the UK, including urban and rural populations, and a range of settings, including services based in the community, in GP practices, in care homes and in hospitals. Whilst the majority of the initiatives led by GPs or geriatricians, they illustrate the vital role that many other professionals play, including nurses, therapists, pharmacists and social workers. The report also outlines some common themes from the case studies, which include person-centred care, multidisciplinary working, taking a proactive approach and making use of resources in the community.

Quick guide: supporting patients' choices to avoid long hospital stays

NHS ENGLAND, et al
2016

This quick guide provides practical advice to help local health and social care systems reduce the time people spend in hospital when they no longer need acute care, but are delayed whilst making decisions about or making arrangements for their ongoing care. The guide covers: providing people with information about their choices after hospital discharge, providing support to allow patients to make choices about their ongoing care, the availability of care homes and care packages at home, a patients refusal to leave hospital, and use of interim packages and placements. Each section includes a checklist of actions to consider to help identify areas for improvement and examples of practical solutions to common problems, including links to useful resources. A template policy and template patient letters that can be customised and used locally are also included.

Helping people look after themselves: a guide on self care

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2016

Brings together eight case studies which show how local authorities in England are involved in a range of innovative schemes to encourage self-care and self-management of long term conditions. The case studies covering both rural and urban environments and with varying levels of deprivation and affluence. The examples include: a network of integrated teams to work with residents at risk; development of a website to help people with long-term conditions to become more involved in self-care; a hotline to promote health lifestyles and self-care, linking people with local services in the local authority, NHS and voluntary sector; a programme to tackle loneliness and social isolation in older people, improve health and wellbeing; Nottingham’s ‘super’ self-care pilot, which includes social prescribing and care navigators; and work in Kirklees which is encouraging the self-management of long term conditions through education, technology, exercise and one-on-one help.

The power of peer support: what we have learned from the Centre for Social Action Innovation Fund

GRAHAM Jullie Tran, RUTHERFORD Katy
2016

This report looks at the value of peer support and the part it can play in a people-powered health system. It also shares practical insights from 10 organisations involved in Nesta’s Centre for Social Action Innovation Fund on how peer support can be effectively scaled and spread to benefit more people. The ten case studies provide details of the peer support innovations and evidence of their impact to date. The peer support models developed included one-to-one peer support, group peer support and digital approaches. From the ten peer support innovations, the report highlights key learning about the realities of delivering peer support across a range of conditions and with very different groups of people. These covers engaging people in peer support; recruiting, training and supporting peer facilitators; and evaluating and improving peer support. The report finds that peer support has the potential to improve psychosocial outcomes, behaviour, wellbeing outcomes, and service use. It also found that reciprocity was an important motivator for volunteers and that the most effective volunteers were trained and well supported. It concludes with what the future might hold for those working with and commissioning peer support in England. Recommendations include developing relationships with public service professionals to help them understand the value of peer support and embedding peer support alongside existing services.

Results 151 - 160 of 420

#EXCLUDE#
News

My Guide: new case example

My Guide: new case example My Guide is a sighted guiding service, started by The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association (Guide Dogs), in which trained volunteers assist blind and partially sighted adults to get out and about, thus helping to prevent social isolation.
View more: News
Ask about support on integration, STPs and transformation
ENQUIRE
Related SCIE content
Related NICE content
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
What do you think about SCIE's work?
FEEDBACK
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#