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All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 11 - 20 of 342

Evaluation of Doncaster Social Prescribing Service: understanding outcomes and impact

DAYSON Chris, BENNETT Ellen
2016

An evaluation of the Doncaster Social Prescribing Service, providing an analysis of outcomes for service users and the costs and benefits of the service between August 2015 and July 2016. It uses interviews with staff and key stakeholders from across health and social care, and users of the service; self-evaluation questionnaires from 292 people using the Service; and quality of life surveys completed by 215 users of the Service. The Social Prescribing Service reached more than 1,000 people referred by their GP, Community Nurse or Pharmacist and enabled almost 600 local people to access support within the community during the evaluation period. The main reasons for referral were a long term health or mental health condition. Positive outcomes for clients included improvements in health related quality of life (HRQL), social connectedness, and financial well-being. However, there was little evidence to suggest a reduction in the use of secondary care and inpatient stays. In health terms, the evaluation estimates that for every £1 of the £180,000 funding spent, the Service produced more than £10 of benefits in terms of better health.

The Rotherham Social Prescribing Service for people with long-term conditions: a GP perspective

DAYSON Chris, MOSS Bronwen
2017

This thematic summary report explores the benefits and challenges of the Rotherham Social Prescribing from the perspective of GPs. It draws on qualitative interviews with 10 GPs and two Practice Managers and data extract from one GP surgery. It paints an overwhelmingly positive picture of the impact of Social Prescribing on GPs and patients, and highlights how the Service has quickly become a central component in a GPs options when treating the causes and consequences of long-term health conditions. Themes that emerged from GP interviews included: enabling GPs to take a holistic approach to health, developing GPs awareness of community-level support, reductions in GP workloads and reduction in medial prescribing. When GPs were asked how Social Prescribing benefitted patients, they referred to reductions in social isolation and loneliness; prevents family and carer breakdown; and providing person centred services. They also provided reflections on Rotherham Social Prescribing model, and what worked effectively.

The Rotherham Social Prescribing Service for People with long-term conditions: evaluation update

DAYSON Chris, DAMM Chris
2017

An updated assessment of the social and economic impact of the Rotherham Social Prescribing Service between September 2012 and March 2016. Originally commissioned as a two-year pilot in 2012 the service is now funded until 2018 through the Better Care Fund. Its two core features are: advisors providing a single gateway to voluntary and community sector (VCS) support for GPs and service users (advisors assess the support needs of patients and carers before referring on to appropriate VCS services) and a grant funding programme for VCS activities to meet the needs of service users. The evaluation reports that between September 2012 and March 2016 the Rotherham Social Prescribing Service supported more than 3,000 local people with long-term health conditions and their carers. It identifies reductions in service users’ use of secondary care, reduced admissions to Accident and Emergency, and improvements in the well-being of service users. Wider benefits seen in the VCS across Rotherham, include additional investment; developing and promoting social action and volunteering; and the development of a ‘micro-commissioning’ model. The evaluation also consistently demonstrated costs avoided by the NHS, with figures across the first four years of service equating to an estimated £647,000 of NHS costs avoided: an initial return on investment of 35 pence for each pound (£1) invested.

Developing an asset based approach within a learning community: using end of life care as an example

NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR PALLIATIVE CARE
2017

The aim of the report is to be a practical guide to help extend the asset based approach already existing in end of life care into a learning and development model. Part one forms a short summary of the findings of a project that looked at ways to build a more sustainable asset based approach to workforce development and provides detail on what an asset based approach can look like and what factors need to be in place, incorporating lessons learnt, case studies and tips from those who have already explored the approach. It also contains examples of innovative resources that can be used to support learning facilitators. Part two looks at the project brief from which the practical guide originated, the methodology and the underpinning literature. It provides additional case studies and further detail on the work of Dying Matters and Dementia Friends, both networks bringing together communities to support end of life care raising awareness activities, which also offer valuable opportunities for workforce learning and development.

Lamb Street to the pod: the journey from 'service user' to citizen: a case study about Coventry City Council's award-winning Pod

THINK LOCAL ACT PERSONAL, NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
2017

This paper describes how Lamb Street Day Centre changed into The Pod, a place providing social brokerage to support and transform the lives of people with severe mental illness whilst also benefitting the wider community. Social brokerage aims to maximise an individual's connection to and inclusion in the community, and help to build social support networks. The Pod receives around 200 referrals a year, and people are supported to re-engage with their communities, access universal opportunities rather than ‘use’ services. The Pod, which is run by Coventry City Council, also hosts a café and manages a city-wide programmes, each bringing people together in a way that leads to positive social change. The paper includes short case studies which show how individuals have benefitted from the Pod.

Carers Leeds Health and Wellbeing programme evaluation

BUNYAN Ann-Marie, WOODALL James, RAINE Gary
2017

Highlights outcomes and learning from a programme to support carers to look after their own physical health and emotional wellbeing, delivered by the charity Carers Leeds. The programme provides one-to-one support to encourage carers to eat more healthily, be more physically active, cut down on alcohol and smoking, manage stress and anxiety and be more socially connected. Health and Wellbeing Support Workers work with carers to help them set and prioritise their health goals, providing carers with the tools and guidance to be able to make changes. The evaluation aimed to establish the impact of the Programme on the health and wellbeing of carers, examine the experiences of carers engaged in the Programme, and provide training and support to the Carers Leeds staff to build capacity for future self-evaluation. It a workshop to develop an understanding of the programme’s Theory of Change; analysis of monitoring data, including carers evaluation forms; telephone interviews with service users, and analysis of Support Worker' reflections on delivering the programme. The evaluation found evidence that the Programme provides meaningful support to carers, which has a positive impact on their health and wellbeing. Positive benefits for carers included reduced social isolation, increased confidence, improved mental wellbeing, improved diet and physical activity levels. Individuals who were previously unable to distinguish themselves as a carer were also able to recognise how vital it is to take of care of their own health. The report also highlights learning for future projects.

Age Friendly Island: local evaluation. Annual evaluation report 16/17

NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
2017

An evaluation of Age Friendly Island (AFI), a partnership of older people and voluntary and public sector agencies working together across the Isle of Wight (IOW) to reduce social isolation, empower older people and influence local culture so that older people are seen as assets rather than burdens. The evaluation covers the period April 2016 to March 2017, covering data gathered across Year 2 of the Programme. It looks at the impact of the 12 projects that make up the AFI, in relation to four outcomes: older people have improved connections within their local community and reduced social isolation; older people feel empowered to co-produce local policies and services; for older people to feel the Island is age-friendly; and an increased sense of health, wellbeing, and quality of life. The projects reported a total of 9,962 new participants in the period 2016-17, with an average of 1,594 people participating across the 12 projects each month. The evaluation found that participation in the Programme has helped older people to increase their social connections, meet new people, and has led to decreased social isolation for people involved. Participants also reported that involvement in the project led to a positive impact on the health, mental health, wellbeing or quality of life. Whilst there are good examples of genuine co-production, the evaluation identified the need for further progress to enable older people to feel empowered to influence projects, services and policies. The AFI Programme is one of 14 Fulfilling Lives: Ageing Better partnerships funded by the Big Lottery.

Homeshare UK sector report 2017


2017

This report draws information from surveys and case studies to look at the current status of the Homeshare sector for the period April 2016 to March 2017. Homeshare brings together two people with different needs to share a home for mutual benefit, such as an older Householder being matched with someone needing low cost accommodation who can provide low level support in exchange. The report provides information about the organisations delivering Homeshare, types of schemes, Homeshare matches and participants, and equality and diversity. It reports that demand for Homeshare continues to grow, with an increase in the numbers of people using Homeshare, the numbers of operating schemes and an increase in the number of enquiries. Anecdotal evidence collected from a small sample of family and friends of Householders, Householders and Homesharers also identified a number of benefits for participants, which included a reduction in loneliness, improved quality of life and re-engagement with local social networks.

Prevention in action: how prevention and integration are being understood and prioritised locally in England

FIELD Olivia
2017

This report provides a picture of local developments in preventative services in England and highlights examples of good practice. It aimed to explore the extent to which local authorities, sustainability and transformation partnerships, and health and wellbeing boards across England recognise and prioritise the Care Act’s understanding of prevention, as well as to better understand how and to what extent local decision makers are integrating health and social care. The methodology included a review of joint health and wellbeing strategies and sustainability and transformation plans, and a Freedom of Information (FOI) request to local authorities. The report finds that while local authorities across England have made efforts to implement preventative services and identifies examples of innovation and good practice, the Care Act’s vision for prevention is not being fully realised and that local authorities in England need to provide more services that prevent, reduce or delay the need for care and support. The report also identified shortcomings in plans for integrating health and social care. Barriers to implementing preventive services include: a lack of clarity on what is meant by prevention and integration, resistance to cultural change, and reduced resources. The report makes recommendations to support a better and integrated, preventative care system.

Making the case for investing in actions to prevent and/or tackle loneliness: a systematic review. A briefing paper

MCDAID David, BAUER Annette, PARK A-La
2017

Summarises findings from a systematic review on the available economic evidence on the cost effectiveness of loneliness interventions for older people. The review found mixed evidence for the cost effectiveness of befriending interventions and the benefits of participation in social activities, ranging from cost saving to cost ineffective interventions. Recent evidence identified suggests that signposting and navigation services have the potential to be cost effective, with a saving of up to £3 of health costs for every £1 invested. The paper also makes suggestions for strengthening the evidence based on the cost effectiveness of interventions to address loneliness.

Results 11 - 20 of 342

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