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Results 11 - 20 of 707

Implementing the Care Act 2014:building social resources to prevent, reduce or delay needs for care and support in adult social care in England

TEW Jerry, et al
2019

This Report is based on research into ‘second wave’ approaches to prevention and capacity building that have become more prominent since the implementation of the Care Act 2014. These approaches involve a fundamental revisioning of the role of local services and seek to maximise resources and opportunities through working in more co-productive ways with citizens, families and communities. The findings are based on a national survey of local authorities and in-depth case study research with stakeholders, beneficiaries and family members in seven local authorities which were promoting one or more ‘second wave’ preventative initiatives. A key findings was that a preventative focus is still relatively new in adult social care and that approaches are often embedded within a variety of strategic initiatives, including: strengths-based models of social work and social care practice (such as 3 Conversations); approaches to social networking and building community capacity (such as Local Area Coordination); mobilising the resources of family and personal networks (through approaches such as Family Group Conferencing, peer support or Community Circles) and targeted ‘upstream’ use of personal budgets. Another finding was that overall, financial pressures were seen as the most important driver towards developing preventative activity, but, at the same time, this was also cited most frequently as the greatest barrier. Other frequently cited barriers to progressing the prevention agenda were competing policy imperatives and, in particular, perceived pressure to make rushed decisions in order to minimise delays in hospital discharge. The report also examines wellbeing outcomes and expenditure. The report makes recommendations for the policy, practice and implementation and evaluation contexts. The reports concludes that there is some strong evidence of the creativity and innovation that is taking place in a significant proportion of local authorities. While progress may not be consistent across the sector, the research shows that a sizable proportion of local authorities have been investing in activity that is designed to increase capacity and capability at individual, family and community levels, and thereby to contribute to preventing, reducing or delaying the need for adult social care services.

Local Area Coordination (IOW) evaluation report: “What is it about Local Area Coordination that makes it work for end users, under what circumstances, how and why?”

MASON James, HARRIS Kevin, RYAN Louise
2019

This evaluation report draws upon the findings of a realist evaluation of the LAC on the Isle of Wight (IOW) to establish how and why the programme worked for people and communities across three demographical areas. As a sample this focused on the first three Local Area Coordinators to mobilise LAC representative of Ryde, Shanklin and Freshwater. The methods selected for this study were made up of Q-method (Watts and Stenner, 2012) and realist interviews. Q-method focuses on subjective viewpoints of its participants asking them to decide what is meaningful and what does (and what does not) have value and significance from their perspective. Q-Method involves developing a set of statements representing a set of viewpoints of certain individuals about an issue or programme. In this case a set of statements about LAC on the IOW were produced and ranked in line with most important to most un-important by end users. These rankings were then analysed to produce holistic narratives illustrating shared viewpoints around how and why LAC worked. This was also supported by realist interviews which sought to further investigate the key mechanisms at play within LAC on the IOW. The findings of the evaluation established that listening, trust and time were consistent across the three Local Area Coordinators sampled in the evaluation. The coordinator also needs to continue to build on relationships with the differing referral groups due to the variety of methods used to make individuals aware of Local Area Coordination. However, it was also quite clear that LAC worked for different end users in different ways with the Q study creating three different subgroups of end users experiencing LAC: subgroup 1 – “I know you are there and that means a lot, but I’m building my own social networks”; subgroup 2 – “Thank you for your support, I’ve come a long way”; subgroup 3 – “I’m moving down the path, but I still need your personalised support”. The findings demonstrate that LAC works for different people in different ways. Within the spirit of the realist approach to the evaluation the three subgroup holistic narratives provide an insight into what works for whom in what circumstances and why.

Telephone befriending: a valuable service during lockdown

HEALTHWATCH ENFIELD
2020

This report gives a brief overview of the telephone befriending scheme set up in the London Borough of Enfield during the Coronavirus pandemic and a snapshot of issues raised by residents identified as being vulnerable or at risk. Overall, Healthwatch Enfield volunteers made 413 telephone befriending calls during this period. The main issue raised by participants was the impact of social isolation on health and wellbeing including mental health issues, with those residents with ongoing health needs being particularly concerned. Recipients appreciated food parcels and medicines delivery but also valued the support of family and neighbours. Most of the recipients were pleased to receive the calls and a core continued to receive these throughout the period. The report suggests that the scheme should be continued if people request it, with established organisations being asked to support the calls. If or when a second wave arises, arrangements should be made to re-establish the full service.

Evidence summary for policy: the role of arts in improving health & wellbeing: report to the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport

FANCOURT Daisy, WARRAN Katey, AUGHTERSON Henry
2020

This report synthesised the findings from over 3,500 studies on the role of the arts in the prevention of ill health, promotion of health, and management and treatment of illness across the lifespan. The reviewed evidence included study designs such as randomized controlled studies, nationally-representative longitudinal cohort studies, communitywide ethnographies, cross-sectional surveys, laboratory experiments, and case studies. The review focuses on how arts engagement can impact on 1) social outcomes, 2) youth development and 3) the prevention of mental and physical illness. It also considers how social prescribing programmes that have used arts interventions can impact on the above three outcomes. The evidence summary assesses the type and quality of evidence available for each outcome. The findings show strong evidence for the following outcomes, suggesting that this evidence can be trusted to guide policy: the use of music to support infant social development; the use of book reading to support child social development; the use of music or reading for speech and language development amongst infants and children; the use of the arts to support aspects of social cohesion; the use of the arts to improve wellbeing (i.e. positive psychological factors) in adults; and the use of the arts to reduce physical decline in older age. In relation to the use of social prescribing (SP), the evidence is promising for wellbeing and social cohesion but weak for physical health and social inequalities, and non-existent for social development, the prevention of mental illness, and cognition. Nevertheless, economic evaluations suggest there may be benefits including returns on investment and social returns on investment from implementing arts-based SP.

Social prescribing for people with mental health needs living in disadvantaged communities: the Life Rooms model

HASSAN Shaima M., et al
2020

Background: People live socially complex lives and have different health care needs influenced by socio-economic factors such as deprivation, unemployment, and poor housing. Lack of access to community based social care results in people seeking social support from health care services. This study explores the Life Rooms as a social prescribing model addressing the social determinants of mental health by providing support and access to resources in a local community setting. With an aim to identify key elements that contribute toward enhancing the effectiveness of the Life Rooms social prescribing approach. Methods: Data were obtained through six semi-structured focus groups with mental health service users from two locations in the North West of the UK. Postcode data was collected to generate an Index for Multiple Deprivation (IMD) score, to understand their socio-economic background. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results: A total of 18 participants took part in the study. The majority of participants came from disadvantaged backgrounds; 14 participants measuring 3 and below in terms of overall IMD scores and 9 participants belonged to the poorest decile (IMD score = 1). Participants reported on different elements of the Life Rooms which they found as an effective approach to care. Four main themes emerged from the data: 1) social belonging: being able to just ‘be’ 2) resourceful and accessible; 3) social inclusion and connectedness; and 4) moving forward: self-development and independence. Conclusion: Findings support the need and benefit social prescribing to improve mental health wellbeing and reduce the burden of mental illness.

Rolling out social prescribing: understanding the experience of the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector

COLE Aimie, JONES Dan, JOPLING Kate
2020

This report sets out the findings of research to explore the perspectives and experiences of the voluntary, community and social enterprise (VCSE) sector in relation to the NHS rollout of social prescribing. The research heard from over 300 people through a series of interviews, workshops and online engagements between December 2019 and June 2020. NHS England has made a significant commitment to ensure that social prescribing is available across the country, including the recruitment of over 1,000 specialist link workers during 2020/21. The study explored key components of the programme and its implications, including: the new social prescribing link workers; measurement; funding; inequality; and coordination, collaboration and partnership. The findings indicate that the VCSE sector is supportive of social prescribing and keen to work constructively with the health system. However, in many places the pace of the rollout has had a destabilising effect by cutting across existing schemes, or failing to build on and invest in the work already done by the sector. Respondents were committed to measurement and using performance data for management and improvement but there are concerns about the use of appropriate measures, which capture the social as well as clinical outcomes of social prescribing. Funding was by far the biggest concern for all those who took part, and specifically in relation to funding for services and activities provided by the VCSE sector. In addition, without appropriate investment, social prescribing could exacerbate inequality in a range of ways – generalist link workers may lack the skills or resources to engage effectively with excluded individuals and communities while poorer communities tend to have lower levels of formal VCSE activity. The findings emphasise that effective social prescribing depends on relationships, both at individual and organisational level – VCSE experiences of the rollout have been most positive in places where relationships were already established.

Helping to tackle loneliness through open data on local services: research report

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2020

This document sets out the findings and emerging recommendations from a project to explore how better management of data can provide a more reliable, more trusted, more accessible and more extensive set of information about local activities, services and support to tackle loneliness. From June 2019 to March 2020, three pilot areas, Elmbridge District Council, Hull City Council and Blackburn with Darwen Council, have been investigating efficient ways of collecting information, exploring how a range of stakeholders can play a role in capturing data and helping keep it up to date and testing and refining underpinning data standards and taxonomies. Section two of this report sets out the issues that exist and the benefits that can be achieved through improving how information is managed locally. Section three introduces the pilots and then relays some of the related experiences and decisions in the course of their involvement. Section four provides summary learning through a maturity model and a broad range of issues, barriers and lessons learned. Section five sets out an outline plan and provides some understanding of the costs and resources that may need to be in place. Section six introduces the technical considerations. The report makes a number of recommendations, calling on place-based leaders to champion the importance and the value of accurate and reliable information about local services in supporting the success of critical initiatives such as social prescribing; and on local partners to work collaboratively and adopt the Open Referral UK standard that has been developed in partnership with the Open Data Community.

Supporting access to activities to enhance well‐being and reduce social isolation in people living with motor neurone disease

SIMPSON Suzanne, et al
2020

Purpose: People living with Motor Neurone Disease (plwMND) have emphasised the importance of psychological support and well‐being in helping them manage their condition. Social prescribing is a formal process of referring patients with largely socioeconomic and psychosocial issues to a link worker to co‐design a plan to improve their health and well‐being. Intervention involves supporting engagement in meaningful activities based within the individual's local community. This pilot project aimed to explore the application of social prescribing with plwMND. Methods: A cohort of plwMND were supported by an occupational therapist and link worker to identify and access community‐based activities. Qualitative interviews were completed post‐intervention with the plwMND and the link workers. Findings were analysed using thematic analysis. Results: A total of nine plwMND took part in this pilot service, and five plwMND and four link workers were interviewed. PlwMND valued participation and wanted to engage in community‐based activities. Those with mild symptomatology were able to access activities and reported a positive impact on their well‐being. Those with more complex needs, particularly reduced mobility, experienced significant barriers to participation. Barriers included transport, equipment provision, lack of company to support participation and lack of confidence using mobility aids in a community environment. Link workers valued joint working with an occupational therapist. Conclusion: Social prescribing aims to address the health inequalities of those living with long‐term conditions, although currently it likely excludes plwMND. Future work needs to quantitatively evaluate the effects of the service on the well‐being of plwMND.

Evaluation of Leicestershire Local Area Coordination: final report

M·E·L RESEARCH
2020

This evaluation of Leicestershire Local Area Coordination (LAC) has comprised both formative (process) and summative (outcome) elements. LAC is a complex community-based intervention, delivered in 10 very different local areas in four of the County’s Districts, operationally delivered by 8 Coordinators with varied backgrounds and different working styles. It is designed to have an impact on three levels: individual, community, and health and social care integration. The evaluation finds that LAC has been effective in achieving its ‘founding’ aims and strategic objectives for individuals (a strong focus on assets-based approaches and a community model of delivery, aimed at ‘upstream prevention’ working with vulnerable residents at risk of crisis). LAC has been moderately effective in achieving its aims and objectives around HSC integration but has been less effective in delivering its’ community-based objectives. The SROI findings provide positive evidence of measurable outcomes for LAC, demonstrating positive SROI ratio of £4.10 in accumulated benefit for every £1 spent. It has been more challenging to make LAC successful (and therefore LAC is likely to have less impact for residents) in areas with less community infrastructure; and as LAC is not a prescriptive service, the impact of LAC for some beneficiaries may be lessened as they may not be ready to take the steps to help them move forward. The most successful elements of LAC have comprised: the relationships between coordinators, and beneficiaries and local partners – trust, flexibility and effective networking; coordinator knowledge of local assets and ability to match this with beneficiary support needs; coordinators being located within the communities they work; the lack of specific agenda for coordinators making them less threatening; and the personal skills and commitment of the coordinator team.

New horizons in supporting older people's health and wellbeing: is social prescribing a way forward?

HAMILTON-WEST Kate, MILNE Alisoun, HOTHAM Sarah
2020

Older people’s health and care needs are changing. Increasing numbers live with the combined effects of age-related chronic illness or disability, social isolation and/or poor mental health. Social prescribing has potential to benefit older people by helping those with social, emotional or practical needs to access relevant services and resources within the local community. However, researchers have highlighted limitations with the existing evidence-base, while clinicians express concerns about the quality of onward referral services, liability and upfront investment required. The current article provides a critical review of evidence on social prescribing, drawing on the RE-AIM Framework (Glasgow et al., 1999) to identify questions that will need to be addressed in order to inform both the design and delivery of services and the evolving research agenda around social prescribing. The authors emphasise the need for researchers and planners to work together to develop a more robust evidence-base, advancing understanding of the impacts of social prescribing (on individuals, services and communities), factors associated with variation in outcomes and strategies needed to implement effective and sustainable programmes. They also call on policymakers to recognise the need for investment in allied initiatives to address barriers to engagement in social prescribing programmes, provide targeted support for carers and improve access to older adult mental health services. The article concludes that social prescribing has potential to support older people’s health and wellbeing, but this potential will only be realised through strategic alignment of research, local level implementation and national policy and investment.

Results 11 - 20 of 707

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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