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CLS Evidence and Learning Briefings. Paper 5: Community Led Support in Scotland

HAYDEN Carol, BROWN Helen, TORRANCE Elaine
2020

One of six briefings to share findings and lessons from a project to explore the impacts of community led support across the UK. Community led support is a place-based approach to achieving change in health and social care services, through working closely with local communities and partners in the voluntary, community, business and public sectors. This briefing paper looks at the UK-wide headline findings and lessons in relation to evidence from Scotland, including how this can contribute to delivering the Scottish Government’s existing and emerging policy priorities. The findings show that community led support in Scotland is improving outcomes for individuals, achieving efficiencies for local Health and Social Care Partnerships (HSCPs), and is contributing to public service reform. It shows the benefits of public bodies and other partners working together around a shared vision and values to effect change.

CLS Evidence and Learning Briefings 2020. Paper 6a: Learning from local approaches to implementing Community Led Support in Somerset

HARFLETT Naomi, BOWN Helen
2020

One of six briefings to share findings and lessons from a project to explore the impacts of community led support across the UK. Community led support is a place-based approach to achieving change in health and social care services, through working closely with local communities and partners in the voluntary, community, business and public sectors. This briefing paper shares findings from the Somerset site to examine whether Community Led Support could deliver better outcomes for the same or less resource. Outcome data examined included: outcomes for individuals (e.g. wellbeing, physical and mental health, social isolation/connections); costs to adult social care and other related services; use of adult social care; and use of voluntary and community sector organisations. Evidence suggests that Community Led Support in Somerset has resulted in a range of positive impacts. The report also highlights findings from data drawn from an analysis of 4 other CLS sites in England who have been running for a similar length of time from 2014-15. A second, linked case study (paper 6B) will share findings and lessons from Scottish Borders.

CLS Evidence and Learning Briefings 2020. Paper 2: the big themes and messages from Community Led Support

NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
2020

A graphical summary shares the major lessons and messages from a project to explore the impacts of community led support across the UK. Community led support is a place-based approach to achieving change in health and social care services, through working closely with local communities and partners in the voluntary, community, business and public sectors. The project identified that community led support is making a difference in a variety of ways as it is implemented locally and also identified some common themes. These include importance of evidence and learning to the success of community led support, the importance of understanding local context and how to work with existing local players and communities, and the need for different kinds of leadership.

Quick guide: falls prevention and management in care homes

NHS ENGLAND. North
2019

A guide to help care home staff to manage and prevent falls and risk of fractures, with an emphasis on person centred care and continuous improvement. It looks a preventing falls through activity and exercise; risk factors in falls, risk assessment and screening, management following a fall, and the importance of education. The guide includes key references to national falls prevention in care homes best practice and NICE quality standards. It also provides links to wider resources and tools. The resource can be used to benchmark existing policies and procedures with care homes to ensure the care given reflects evidence-based practice.

Effectiveness of multifactorial interventions in preventing falls among older adults in the community: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

LEE Seon Heui, YU Soyoung
2020

Background: Falls often cause unexpected injuries that older adults find difficult to recover from (e.g., hip and other major fractures, intracranial bleeding); therefore, fall prevention and interventions are of particular significance. Objectives: This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of multifactorial fall prevention interventions among community-dwelling older adults and compare subgroups that differed in terms of their degree of fall risk and the intensity and components of interventions. Methods: An exhaustive systematic literature search was undertaken using the following databases: Ovid-Medline, Ovid-Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Central). Two investigators independently extracted data and assessed the quality of the studies by examining the risk of bias. This study conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials that had been published up to March 31st, 2019, using Review Manager. Results: Of 1,328 studies, 45 articles were relevant to this study. In total, 29 studies included participants in the high-risk group, 3 in the frail group, and 13 in the healthy older adult group. Additionally, 28 and 17 studies used active and referral multifactorial interventions, respectively. Multifactorial interventions included the following components: exercise, education, environmental modification, medication, mobility aids, and vision and psychological management. Multifactorial interventions significantly reduced fall rates in the high-risk (risk ratio 0.66; 95% confidence interval 0.52–0.84) and healthy groups (risk ratio 0.72; 95% confidence interval 0.58–0.89), when compared to the control group. Active multifactorial interventions (risk ratio 0.64; 95% confidence interval 0.51–0.80) and those featuring exercise (risk ratio 0.66; 95% confidence interval 0.54–0.80) and environmental modification also showed significantly reduced fall rates (risk ratio 0.65; 95% confidence interval 0.54–0.79) compared to usual care. Multifactorial interventions had a significantly lower number of people who experienced falls during the study period compared to usual care in the healthy group (risk ratio 0.77; 95% confidence interval 0.62–0.95). Active multifactorial interventions (risk ratio 0.73; 95% confidence interval 0.60–0.89) and those featuring exercise (risk ratio 0.79; 95% confidence interval 0.66–0.95) and environmental modification (risk ratio 0.80; 95% confidence interval 0.68–0.95) had a significantly lower number of people who experienced falls compared to those receiving usual care. Conclusions: Active multifactorial interventions had positive effects on fall rates and the number of people experiencing falls. Thus, healthcare workers, including nurses, should be involved in planning fall prevention programs so that older adults can be provided with optimal care; multifactorial interventions that include exercise and environmental modification are particularly effective in reducing falls.

Interventions to prevent or delay long-term nursing home placement for adults with impairments: a systematic review of reviews

DUAN-PORTER Wei, et al
2020

Background: With continued growth in the older adult population, US federal and state costs for long-term care services are projected to increase. Recent policy changes have shifted funding to home and community-based services (HCBS), but it remains unclear whether HCBS can prevent or delay long-term nursing home placement (NHP). Methods: This study searched MEDLINE (OVID), Sociological Abstracts, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Embase (from inception through September 2018); and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Joanna Briggs Institute Database, AHRQ Evidence-based Practice Center, and VA Evidence Synthesis Program reports (from inception through November 2018) for English-language systematic reviews. This study also sought expert referrals. Eligible reviews addressed HCBS for community-dwelling adults with, or at risk of developing, physical and/or cognitive impairments. Two individuals rated quality (using modified AMSTAR 2) and abstracted review characteristics, including definition of NHP and interventions. From a prioritized subset of the highest-quality and most recent reviews, this study abstracted intervention effects and strength of evidence (as reported by review authors). Results: Of 47 eligible reviews, most focused on caregiver support (n = 10), respite care and adult day programs (n = 9), case management (n = 8), and preventive home visits (n = 6). Among 20 prioritized reviews, 12 exclusively included randomized controlled trials, while the rest also included observational studies. Prioritized reviews found no overall benefit or inconsistent effects for caregiver support (n = 2), respite care and adult day programs (n = 3), case management (n = 4), and preventive home visits (n = 2). For caregiver support, case management, and preventive home visits, some reviews highlighted that a few studies of higher-intensity models reduced NHP. Reviews on other interventions (n = 9) generally found a lack of evidence examining NHP. Discussion: Evidence indicated no benefit or inconsistent effects of HCBS in preventing or delaying NHP. Demonstration of substantial impacts on NHP may require longer-term studies of higher-intensity interventions that can be adapted for a variety of settings.

Economic evaluation of a falls prevention exercise program among people With Parkinson's disease

FARAG Inez, et al
2016

Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the cost‐effectiveness of a 6‐month minimally supervised exercise program for people with PD. Methods: An economic analysis was conducted alongside a randomized, controlled trial in which 231 people age 40 years and over with PD were randomized into a usual care control group or an exercise group. Cost‐effectiveness was estimated using incremental cost per fall prevented (using falls calendars) as the primary analysis and cost per extra person avoiding mobility deterioration (defined as an improvement or no change in the 12‐point Short Physical Performance Battery Score between baseline and 6 month). A cost‐utility analysis using the Short Form‐6D was also performed. Uncertainty was represented using cost‐effectiveness scatter plots and acceptability curves. Planned subgroup analyses for the low‐disease‐severity group were also undertaken. Results: All results are reported in Australian dollars ($A). The average cost of the intervention was $A1,010 per participant. Incremental cost‐effectiveness of the program relative to usual care was $A574 per fall prevented, $A9,570 per extra person avoiding mobility deterioration, and $A338,800 per quality‐adjusted life year gained. The intervention had an 80% probability of being cost‐effective, relative to the control, at a threshold of $A2,000 per fall prevented. Subgroup analyses for the low‐disease‐severity group indicate the program to be dominant, that is, less costly and more effective than usual care for all health outcomes. Conclusion: The exercise intervention appeared cost‐effective with regard to fall prevention in the whole sample and cost saving in the low disease severity group, when compared with usual care.

Efficacy and generalizability of falls prevention interventions in nursing homes: a systematic review and meta-analysis

GULKA Heidi J, et al
2020

Objectives: To determine the efficacy of fall intervention programs in nursing homes (NHs) and the generalizability of these interventions to people living with cognitive impairment and dementia. Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Setting and Participants: NH residents (n = 30,057) living in NHs defined as residential facilities that provide 24-hours-a-day surveillance, personal care, and some clinical care for persons who are typically aged ≥65 years with multiple complex chronic health conditions. Methods: Meta-analysis of falls prevention interventions on number of falls, fallers, and recurrent fallers. Results: Thirty-six studies met inclusion criteria for the systematic review. Overall, fall prevention interventions reduced the number of falls [risk ratio (RR) = 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.60-0.88], fallers (RR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.72-0.89), and recurrent fallers (RR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.60-0.81). Subanalyses revealed that single interventions have a significant effect on reducing fallers (RR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.69-0.89) and recurrent fallers (RR = 0.60, 95% CI = 0.52-0.70), whereas multiple interventions reduce fallers (RR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.39-0.97) and multifactorial interventions reduce number of falls (RR = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.45-0.94). Conclusions and Implications: Exercise as a single intervention reduced the number of fallers and recurrent fallers by 36% and 41%, respectively, in people living in NHs. Other effective interventions included staff education and multiple and multifactorial interventions. However, more research on exercise including people with cognitive impairment and dementia is needed to improve the generalizability of these interventions to the typical NH resident.

Community exchange and time currencies: a systematic and in-depth thematic review of impact on public health outcomes

LEE C, et al
2020

Objectives: Austerity in government funding, and public service reform, has heightened expectations on UK communities to develop activities and resources supportive of population health and become part of a transformed place-based system of community health and social care. As non-monetary place-based approaches, Community Exchange/Time Currencies could improve social contact and cohesion, and help mobilise families, neighbourhoods, communities and their assets in beneficial ways for health. Despite this interest, the evidence base for health outcomes resulting from such initiatives is underdeveloped. Study design: A systematic review. Methods: A literature review was conducted to identify evidence gaps and advance understanding of the potential of Community Exchange System. Studies were quality assessed, and evidence was synthesised on ‘typology’, population targeted and health-related and wider community outcomes. Results: The overall study quality was low, with few using objective measures of impact on health or well-being, and none reporting costs. Many drew on qualitative accounts of impact on health, well-being and broader community outcomes. Although many studies lacked methodological rigour, there was consistent evidence of positive impacts on key indicators of health and social capital, and the data have potential to inform theory. Conclusions: Methodologies for capturing impacts are often insufficiently robust to inform policy requirements and economic assessment, and there remains a need for objective, systematic evaluation of Community Exchange and Time Currency systems. There is also a strong argument for deeper investigation of ‘programme theories’ underpinning these activities, to better understand what needs to be in place to trigger their potential for generating positive health and well-being outcomes.

Regular doses of nature: the efficacy of green exercise interventions for mental wellbeing

ROGERSON Mike, et al
2020

This study investigated the efficacy of medium-term Green Exercise (GE; being physically active within a natural environment) interventions for improving wellbeing, by pooling data collected at the start and end of participants’ engagement with a range of GE interventions. Hypotheses were that (i) interventions would show good efficacy for improving wellbeing in the overall sample; (ii) compared to participants reporting ‘average to high’ wellbeing at the start of their project, participants with ‘low’ starting wellbeing would report greater improvements post-intervention; and (iii) improvements would significantly differ between age groups. The pooled dataset was categorized in line with UK norms (n = 318) and analyzed using a standardized meta-analysis approach. Effect size was large: g = 0.812 (95% CI [0.599, 1.025]), and differences in wellbeing changes associated with project duration, age or sex were not statistically significant. Compared to those reporting ‘average-high’ starting wellbeing, participants reporting ‘low’ starting wellbeing exhibited greater improvements (BCa 95% CI [−31.8, −26.5]), with 60.8% moving into the ‘average-high’ wellbeing category. GE can play an important role in facilitating wellbeing and can provide alternative pathways for health and social care practice. Public health commissioners should consider integrating such interventions for patients experiencing low wellbeing or associated comorbidities.

Results 21 - 30 of 670

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