#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 21 - 30 of 707

Promising approaches revisited: effective action on loneliness in later life

JOPLING Kate
2020

Drawing on the expertise and experience of leading figures in the field, academic literature and other evidence, this report presents an update to an earlier framework for loneliness interventions published in 2015. The framework helps to make sense of the different ways we can address loneliness, and explains how these approaches fit together to create an effective community response. The guide offers examples of these approaches in action so that organisations can find inspiration from others. The new guide learns the lessons of the last five years – as well as the impact of the pandemic and how organisations tackling loneliness have adapted. Its key message is that to tackle loneliness, different types of support need to be in place. People need to have the infrastructure to engage in social life, whether that is about digital, transport or a built environment that supports social life. Finally, there are direct ways of reducing loneliness whether that is one-to-one or in groups, or psychological support. A key change to the framework is the addition of the built environment as part of the ‘gateway infrastructure’ that helps tackle loneliness, recognising the role shops, cafes and pubs play as places to meet.

Tackling loneliness

BELLIS Alexander, LOFT Philip
2020

This briefing examines the Government loneliness strategy ‘A connected society: a strategy for tackling loneliness – laying the foundations for change’ and the steps taken so far by the Government. The strategy set out a wide variety of cross-departmental measures that the Government would take to provide 'national leadership' to tackle loneliness in England. The paper focuses in particular on progress made in relation to social prescribing; community infrastructure – housing, community spaces, transport, digital inclusion, arts, culture and leisure; and targeted support. The briefing also looks at research into the causes and impact of loneliness and possible interventions. The impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on loneliness is also considered, alongside the measures introduced by the Government in response. Finally, this paper briefly outlines the situation in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Connecting communities: a qualitative investigation of the challenges in delivering a national social prescribing service to reduce loneliness

HOLDING Eleanor, et al
2020

Loneliness is a global public health concern linked to a range of negative health outcomes (Cacioppo & Cacioppo, 2018. The Lancet. 391(10119), 426). Internationally, this has led to the development of a number of interventions, but these are rarely implemented or evaluated on a large scale. This paper is one of the first of its kind to describe elements of an evaluation of a large‐scale national social prescribing scheme to reduce loneliness, deploying individual link workers to signpost people to community activities. Reporting on findings from interviews with staff (n = 25 of which 6 were repeat interviews) and volunteers (n = 9) between October 2017 and December 2018 in localities across the United Kingdom. We reflect on the complexities of the link worker role, the challenges of service delivery and the importance of community infrastructure. There was evidence that highly skilled link workers who had developed positive relationships with providers and service‐users were key to the success of the intervention. As well as providing an effective liaison and signposting function, successful link workers tailored the national programme to local need to proactively address specific gaps in existing service provision. For social prescribing services to be successful and sustainable, commissioners must consider additional funding of community infrastructure.

Social prescribing

EATON Matthew
2020

This paper details the development of social prescribing policies in England and provides an overview of schemes in the devolved nations. Social prescribing is a means for GPs and other healthcare professionals to refer patients via a link worker to non-clinical services in the local community. Link workers help people to understand the underlying issues affecting their health and wellbeing and work with them to co-produce a personalised care and support plan. People can take up a range of activities and services including the arts, nature-based activities, physical activity classes and counselling. This briefing examines the background and path to social prescribing, looking at key initiatives and reports; Government policy; the benefits of social prescribing; and social prescribing in the devolved nations.

'Care navigation' is being widely adopted in primary care, but in varying ways

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH RESEARCH. Dissemination Centre
2020

This NIHR Signal focuses on a study to explore how care navigation is being implemented by Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) in England. Care navigation in primary care helps people with non-medical issues to access alternative services. This social prescribing also aims to reduce the pressure on general practice. The research surveyed CCGs in England about who provided care navigation, which types of patients were referred to care navigators and how, and whether this service was being evaluated. A total of 193 CCGs responded to the survey, with 162 provided usable data. The study shows that the role is fulfilled in different ways by people with a wide variety of job titles. This may make it harder for patients to understand what the role is and how it can help them. Only a third of CCGs who responded have assessed the use of care navigators or have plans to assess their impact.

Behavioural activation therapy for depression in adults

UPHOFF E., et al
2020

This systematic review sought to find out how well behavioural activation therapy works for depression in adults. Behavioural activation is a type of psychological therapy that encourages a person to develop or get back into activities which are meaningful to them. The therapy involves scheduling activities and monitoring behaviours and looking at specific situations where changing these behaviours and activities may be helpful. The review looked at 53 randomised controlled studies involving 5495 participants and conducted in 14 countries. The review found that behavioural activation may treat depression better than receiving usual care. It is unclear whether it works better than medication or being on a waiting list, and there was no evidence for this outcome comparing behavioural activation to no treatment or placebo treatment. There was no differences between behavioural activation and CBT in treating depression. Although there was not enough evidence to compare behavioural activation reliably with other psychotherapies, it may work better than humanistic therapy, and no differences were found between behavioural activation and third‐wave CBT or psychodynamic therapy. No evidence was available comparing behavioural activation to integrative therapies. This systematic review suggests that behavioural activation may be more effective than humanistic therapy, medication, and treatment as usual, and that it may be no less effective than CBT, psychodynamic therapy, or being placed on a waiting list. However, confidence in these findings is limited due to concerns about the certainty of the evidence.

All those who wander are not lost: walking with purpose in extra care, retirement and domestic housing

BARRETT Julie, EVANS Simon, PRITCHARD-WILKES Vanessa
2020

Sets out the findings from a mixed methods study exploring walking with purpose in extra care, retirement and domestic housing settings, along with the perceptions and responses of staff and family carers. The term ‘wandering’ has become a label with negative overtones in the context of dementia care and suggests aimlessness, whereas in fact there is often a purpose or aim behind this activity. In recognition of this, the term ‘walking with purpose’ is used in this study while also acknowledging that this includes ‘wandering’ as a normal and valuable human activity. The study indicates that, although residents who walk with purpose constitute a minority of people living in retirement and extra care housing schemes, managing walking with purpose can be a challenge for management and staff and can occupy a disproportionate amount of their time. The findings emphasise the importance of: getting to know the resident, finding out their motivations and reasons for walking and trying to accommodate their wishes; ensuring staff receive appropriate training in understanding and addressing walking with purpose; ensuring the design of the physical environment supports the way-finding abilities of people living with dementia. Example design recommendations that emerged from this study include: gardens and outdoor spaces must be secure and enclosed; provide safe indoor and outdoor walking routes with frequent places to rest and interesting things to see and do along the way; design features to assist with way-finding. The paper also supports the use of assistive technology devices such as contact ID wrist bands, door sensors, speaking door sensors, GPS trackers and alarm mats.

Simply the best? Making Leeds the best city to grow old in

MELANIE HENWOOD ASSOCIATES
2020

Research exploring the local strategic policy context for meeting the care and health need of older people in Leeds, and how the Leeds Neighbourhood Networks understand and contribute to the agenda. The Leeds Neighbourhood Network (LNN), comprised of 37 locally led ‘schemes’ operated by a number of voluntary sector organisations, provides preventative support to older people in order to enable them to continue living independently and participate in their communities. They assist with a range of services and activities that promote the independence, health and wellbeing of older people throughout Leeds. This paper outlines the number of opportunities and challenges the LNNs face within the strategic policy context, and looks at the potential for Leeds to share more widely the benefits of its approach and experience. It describes how the LNNs are firmly rooted in their local neighbourhoods and understand the needs and preferences of local citizens they are in touch with and suggests there is an opportunity for them to develop a more outward looking style and connect people to a much wider range of community assets and resources. Furthermore, the LNNs could be more closely involved in supporting self-management for people with long-term conditions, and for health practitioners to benefit from being able to access groups of people needing support with diabetes, or COPD, or similar chronic conditions. Among the challenges, the paper cites the extremely diverse nature of LNNs, the risk that other third sector organisations perceive their own contribution to be less valued, the need to constantly adjust and tailor the ‘offer’ to reflect the changing needs of the older population, the lack of synergy between the LNNs and partners, the difficulties in implementing and evidencing strengths and asset-based approaches and the uncertainty about future funding and the direction of government policy.

Promising approaches revisited: supplementary case studies

JOPLING Kate
2020

This supplement is a companion piece to the report Promising Approaches Revisited: Effective action on loneliness in later life. That report sets out the different elements needed for effective action to reduce loneliness. These case studies show the framework in action, illustrating how each element may work in practice. They cover: connectors services, including social prescribing; direct solution including group-based interventions and one-to-one approaches; gateway infrastructure such as digital technology and the built environment; and neighbourhood approaches.

Prevention in social care: where are we now?

WAVEHILL SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC RESEARCH, SKILLS FOR CARE
2019

This report draws together the main findings from a research study, which aimed to provide an overview of the published and unpublished literature relating to prevention in social care; consult with stakeholders to understand more about engagement with the prevention agenda; and identify examples of practice in England to learn more about how prevention is working in social care. The literature identified five key approaches to prevention: advice and guidance; physical activity promotion; social prescribing; reablement; and asset-based approaches. For each approach, the report provides a brief outline and examples of good practice. The report also looks at the interplay between prevention and the integration agenda, focusing on new care models, wellbeing teams, and new and emerging job roles; explores how to develop capacity in social care, through learning and development resources, use of technology, and commissioning and contracting; and examines the critical factors to effectively implement and embed prevention in practice.

Results 21 - 30 of 707

#EXCLUDE#
News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
Related SCIE content
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#