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All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 21 - 30 of 583

WRVS: delivering the preventative social care agenda

BERRY Lynne
2010

This article starts by outlining the importance of increased prevention investment and produces a series of evidence that emphasises how preventative approaches improve the quality of life of older people, whilst providing value for money. It describes prevention in this context as: giving older people respect for who they are; giving older people the feeling they are in control; having people older people trust around them; and giving older people the help they want, when they need it. After providing simple statistics outlining the success, this article moves on to illustrate, through personal stories, how the work of the Women's Royal Voluntary Service (WRVS) sits at the heart of delivering the preventative social care agenda. The paper ends by putting out a question for debate: what will the entitlement to preventative support mean in practice in a reformed social care system?

Preventive social care: is it cost effective?

CURRY Natasha
2006

This paper attempts to pull together and review key pieces of evidence about the cost effectiveness of prevention. The findings, which reflect a paucity of quantified information about the effectiveness of preventive interventions, suggest that there is a strong financial case for reducing hospitalisation (particularly through falls) and for reducing the rate of institutionalisation by maintaining independence. Small-scale trials show that small interventions could prevent falls and reduce the rate of institutionalisation. However, establishing a direct causal relationship between such interventions and long-term financial savings has proved problematic although. There is a lack of consensus over the cost effectiveness of intermediate care although there is evidence that it is cost effective when targeting specific groups/illnesses/events such as stroke and falls. Evidence for secondary stroke prevention services is perhaps the strongest, and most widely quantified, body of research. There is some evidence that primary prevention strategies (such as smoking cessation and reduced salt intake) have potential to reduce the incidence of stroke. The paper makes a series of recommendations, calling for a greater focus on low-level interventions, particularly where there is qualitative evidence that they are valued by service users; implementation of promising interventions, even if not supported by robust evidence, accompanying by formal evaluation during roll-out; development of standard outcome measures of prevention; targeting resources to ensure greatest impact; and greater integration between health and social care services as a drive to shift services towards the preventive end of the spectrum.

A toolkit to support the commissioning of targeted preventative services: South West regional commissioning

SOUTH WEST JOINT IMPROVEMENT PARTNERSHIP
2010

This toolkit was developed by the Institute of Public Care to help commissioners of adult social care and health services in the South West of England target prevention and early intervention services more effectively, given the prospect of severely limited resources and a significant projected rise in the region’s population of older people. With reduced expenditure per head therefore available, the toolkit aims to help local authorities assess existing services, identify shortcomings, and contribute to the development of new, more effective preventative services. There is a particular focus on identifying individuals likely to come to rely on high-intensity, high-cost services while they are still divertible from that path. This toolkit includes a series of tools templates and performance information frameworks that will help local authorities in the South West and their partners to: develop a more refined framework for understanding the distribution of prevention, early intervention, intervention and substitute support services; analyse the distribution of current services for older people across levels of need and identify where greater targeting of those in need might be effective; and plan how to refocus where greater targeting of those in need might be most effective.

Hospital to a Healthier Home: evaluation of a winter pressures pilot service

CARE AND REPAIR CYMRU
2019

An evaluation of the Hospital to a Healthier Home pilot scheme, delivered by Care and Repair, which ran from 11 hospitals between January and March 2019. The scheme aimed to support older people to be safely and more quickly discharged from hospitals to their homes and prevent them being re-admitted by making their homes safe and more accessible. This evaluation describes how the Hospital to a Health Home case worker service started, what type of interventions have been provided to patients and hospital staff, costs, benefits and the difference it has made to patient well-being, quicker safe discharges, and preventing re-admissions. The pilot involved dedicated Care and Repair case workers based at each hospital to facilitate practical improvements to a patient’s home and offer practical support on issues such as benefits entitlements. During the evaluation period: 626 patients were referred through Hospital to a Healthier Home service; 508 patients received work that helped quicker safe discharge. Based on a local assessment of bed day savings, the evaluation found that service costs are fully substantiated, and return £2.80 for every £1 invested (both revenue and capital). NHS frontline staff interviewed for the evaluation study also felt the service was of significant benefit and had the potential to deliver more.

Let's Dance! How dance improves physical and mental health: a briefing for the Cross-Party Group on Arts and Health

WELSH NHS CONFEDERATION
2019

This briefing provides examples to show some of the ways that dance is being used to improve people's physical and mental wellbeing across Wales. The initiatives include: Movement for Stroke Rehabilitation, delivered in partnership with Cardiff and Vale University Health Board (UHB) and Rubicon Dance; Breakin’ for Better Mental Health, which involves both breakdancing and rap music as expressive art forms to improve young people’s emotional and mental health; Dance for Parkinson’s; Dance to Health, a falls prevention project for older people been developed by Aesop and Swansea Bay UHBat Swansea Bay UHB. The examples show how dance initiatives can support the prevention agenda by helping people stay active and healthy outside of traditional health and social care settings.

In-home use of personalized music for persons with dementia

KULIBERT Danica, et al
2019

Although evidence is mounting that personalised music has beneficial effects for long-term care residents with dementia, little research has examined the effects of personalised music for the majority of persons with dementia living at home. These individuals live at home with care partners who may also benefit from having music that is personalised for their loved one. Using the Music & MemorySM program of personalised playlists delivered via iPod Shuffles®, the current study examined the effects of the Music & Memory program for persons with dementia by using the Bath Assessment of Subjective Quality of Life in Dementia scale and a Music Listening Experience Scale developed for this study. This study also administered three scales that captured care partner experiences. Transcripts of the Bath Assessment of Subjective Quality of Life in Dementia administrations at the beginning of the study and 3 months later, plus interviews about the Music & Memory program, were then analysed using the interpretive phenomenological analysis method. Themes about the Music & Memory program and life living with dementia for from diagnosed persons and their care partners are discussed.

Treasury of arts activities for older people

Postlethwaite Liz
2019

A collection of 50 participatory arts activities to provide practical ideas and inspiration for those working with older people in any setting. The collection includes short activities that take 15 minutes or less, longer activities, and planned workshops of 45 minutes or more. They cover visual art, music, movement and dance, performance and stories and poetry. The publication also provide min-guides that explore the challenges of working with older people, things to consider when working in different settings or when working with people with dementia. A selection of links are also included to help develop further skills.

Shared Lives intermediate care: evaluation report

NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
2019

An evaluation of Shared Lives intermediate care, a pilot programme to develop Shared Lives as a ‘home from hospital’ service for older people. The evaluation looks at the impact of the programme for people who are ready to leave hospital, but unable to return home. It draws on qualitative data from people in Shared Lives arrangements, Shared Lives carers, health and social care professionals, as well as data gathered from the seven pilot sites. The findings show that by the end of the Shared Lives Intermediate Care Pilot programme, which ran from October 2016-April 2019, there had been 31 home from hospital referrals into a Shared Lives arrangement. This included people with learning disability, mental health problems and physical disability. Although referrals were low, overall the evaluation demonstrate the potential benefits of Shared Lives Intermediate Care for the health outcomes of people with multiple or complex needs, in particular, people with mental health issues. Key challenges experienced by the pilots included getting health professionals to trust the Shared Lives model and make referrals. There were also capacity and resource issues, with two sites withdrawing from the pilots. The report makes recommendations for Shared Lives Schemes and services.

Innovations in community-centred support

THINK LOCAL ACT PERSONAL
2019

An online directory which provides examples of innovative and community-centred models of support that improve people's wellbeing. The directory will help commissioners and providers to find out about community-centred approaches that are having a positive impact on people's lives. It covers examples in the following areas: helping people stay well and connected with others; supporting people to contribute; supporting people to live well at home; new models of care and support with accommodation; and regaining independence. The examples are all person-centred, work with people’s strengths; and are about supporting people to have a life and not a service.

Resilience: understanding the interdependence between individuals and communities

DAVIES Alisha R., et al
2019

Drawing on the results of a literature review, this report brings together evidence on individual and community resilience, and the interdependence between the two. It draws on examples of programmes to strengthen resilience across the life course and in communities, and looks at approaches to measuring change in resilience. The report highlights how people’s sense of wellbeing, how well they cope emotionally, and how they engage socially are the key factors for resilience, which in turn contribute to wider community resilience. Resilient communities can draw on the assets within people, place and wider economic factors. It also finds that resilience is not fixed but changes at different points in peoples' lives. The report highlights a range of activities that improve community and individual resilience, including: encouraging good relationships and connections with others; establishing a healthy family environment and early positive parent-child relationships; promoting good health and mental wellbeing in adulthood, including developing positive relationships and social capital through engaging with the community; and enhancing the resilience of older people though building positive relationships, strengthening social connections and meaningful engagement, alongside enhancing autonomy and independence. It concludes with a summary of the key messages.

Results 21 - 30 of 583

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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