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All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 291 - 300 of 421

Supporting influence on health and wellbeing boards: report from survey 2015

REGIONAL VOICES
2015

This report lays out the results from a survey for the voluntary and community sector (VCS), between December 2014 and January 2015, about how it is engaging with health and wellbeing boards. 119 people responded sharing their experiences from across England. While some good practice for how boards involve the VCS is emerging, some challenges remain. VCS appears to be under-utilised by local partners in health and care. Although there is considerable desire in the VCS to work with HWBs, only 22 per cent of respondents reported being able to link in with local Healthwatch or a sub-group of the HWB and around 30 per cent were able to raise issues with a VCS representative and only 9 per cent of respondents felt their organisation was linked with the work of the HWB (a reduction since the last survey). There is strong awareness that resources for local engagement are limited - with reduced capacity of local authority officers, commissioners (health and LA), the VCS and Healthwatch to work together. VCS organisations ask for clearer routes of engagement; timely involvement; and for information about developments to be shared from the board.

Fit for frailty: part 2: developing, commissioning and managing services for people living with frailty in community settings

BRITISH GERIATRICS SOCIETY, ROYAL COLLEGE OF GENERAL PRACTITIONERS
2015

Provides advice and guidance on the development, commissioning and management of services for people living with frailty in community settings. The first section introduces the concept of frailty and sets out the rationale for developing frailty services. The second section explores the essential characteristics of a good service. The third section considers the issue of performance and outcome measures for frailty services. The appendix to the report includes eight case studies of services which are operating in different parts of the UK. The audience for this guidance comprises GPs, geriatricians, health service managers, social service managers and commissioners of services. It is a companion report to an earlier BGS publication, Fit for Frailty Part 1 which provided advice and guidance on the care of older people living with frailty in community and outpatient settings.

Fit for frailty: consensus best practice guidance for the care of older people living with frailty in community and outpatient settings

TURNER Gillian
2014

The first of a two-part guidance on the recognition and management of older patients with frailty in community and outpatient settings. This guide has been produced in association with the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) and Age UK and aims to be an invaluable tool for social workers, ambulance crews, carers, GPs, nurses and others working with older people in the community. The guidance will help them to recognise the condition of frailty and to increase understanding of the strategies available for managing it. In the guidelines, the British Geriatrics Society (BGS) calls for all those working with older people to be aware of, and assess for frailty. It dispels the myth that all older people are frail and that frailty is an inevitable part of age. It also highlights the fact that frailty is not static. Like other long term conditions it can fluctuate in severity.

Supporting self-management: summarising evidence from systematic reviews

NATIONAL VOICES
2014

This booklet sets out research findings of the benefits of supporting people to self-manage. It also sets out the evidence for the impact of self-management education for patients, proactive telephone and psychosocial support, home-based self-monitoring and simplified dosing strategies and information. Self-management includes all the actions taken by people to recognise, treat and manage their own healthcare independently of or in partnership with the healthcare system. People feel more confident and engaged when they are encouraged to self-manage by professionals, therefore supporting self-management is key to prioritising person-centred care. Drawing on the findings from 228 systematic reviews, the paper concludes that the top three things that might most usefully be invested in are disease specific, generic and on-line self-management courses, proactive telephone support and self monitoring of symptoms and vital signs.

ADASS budget survey 2015: report

ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES
2015

An analysis of the state of adult social care finances, providing in-depth intelligence on how adult social care is responding to the twin challenges of meeting increased demand and managing reducing resources. The survey seeks to explore the views of Directors of Adult Social Services across English Local Authorities on how councils are reconciling the growing numbers of people, often with increasingly complex needs, requiring care and support with the significant and sustained reductions in the funding available. The survey data sets out the concerns of councils in making increasingly difficult choices and the attempts to minimise impacts upon front line services. The report suggests that taking the growth in numbers of older and disabled people into account an additional £1.1 billion would be needed to provide the same level of service as last year. The care provision market is becoming increasingly fragile and 56 per cent of directors report that providers are facing financial difficulties. Many local authorities are going to have to pay more if providers are to be able to attract workers as unemployment falls. While directors see increased prevention and integration as their top two areas for savings for this year, next and beyond, many are struggling to balance investment in reducing future demand and costs at a time when budgets to meet existing statutory duties to provide care and support to those most in need are under such pressure. The paper calls upon the Government to urgently ensure that social care funding is protected and aligned with the NHS, including making provision for the social care funding gap alongside the funding gap for the NHS.

Social action: harnessing the potential: a discussion paper

GREAT BRITAIN. Cabinet Office
2015

This discussion paper explains what social action is and how it plays an important role in helping to respond to long-standing challenges. Social action is about people coming together to help improve their lives and solve the problems that are important in their communities. The paper provides an update on government programmes to develop its reach and impact. It sets out how social action: empowers local groups, enabling local solutions and building resilient communities; increases the resources available to achieve social goals; offers new sources of expertise and knowledge; enables broader and better targeted support; creates new models for how society can respond to challenges; and helps reduce demands on public services.

Assisted living technology and services: a learning development framework

SKILLS FOR CARE
2013

A learning and development framework to support those involved in the commissioning, design or delivery of workforce development. The framework aims to help ensure that the social care workforce has the skills and knowledge to use assisted living technology to enhance the lives of vulnerable people and their carers. Five stages provide the structure for the framework: Readiness; Customer Flow Analysis (guidance to assist the identification of work or service flow in your or your partner's organisation); Workforce Analysis (which provides guidance on how to map tasks and roles to knowledge and skills needed); Learning Design and Delivery (providing tools and resources for learning) and Checking (helping to evaluate the impact of learning). The framework also provides definitions, terminology and language that can be used by all when preparing workforce development products in the assistive living technology field.

Are housing associations ready for an ageing population?

WHEATLEY Martin
2015

The report addresses the future housing needs of older people and the role of housing associations in providing supported accommodation and care. It examines these challenges over the medium term investment horizon to the 2030's. In particular, it explores what the older population will be like at that time, what housing association boards should be thinking about now, and what the sector and government need to do to realise the opportunities and manage the risks associated with older people's housing. The report also considers how the links between housing, health and social care can be improved, and asks if housing providers understand the expectations and aspirations of their tenants as they grow older. The report is based on published official statistics, a survey of social landlords, a round table discussion with social landlord executives and a literature review. The findings suggest that housing associations need to understand their older customers better, be clear about the implications of population ageing for their existing stock and new build housing, and to develop services which emphasise the promotion of personal, social and economic wellbeing.

Living a normal life: supporting the development of dementia friendly communities

HENWOOD Melanie
2015

An evaluation of a Skills for Care funded a programme of 12 pilot projects, across 11 organisations, for 12 months in 2013/14 designed to support the development of dementia friendly communities (DFCs), by improving community understanding and awareness of dementia and supporting people living with dementia and their carers to participate in their communities. Section 1 of the report provides an introduction both to the underlying objectives of the programme, and to the participating pilot sites. Section 2 presents an overview of the cross-cutting themes and issues identified across the sites, including motivation and engagement, working with the wider community, intergenerational aspects, engaging with GPs and the NHS, and impact and outcomes. The methodology for the evaluation included analysis of written reports; and one to one semi-structured interviews with project leads. The report highlights the importance of motivation and personal engagement as driving forces while suggesting that most projects encountered difficulties – to a greater or lesser extent – in trying to work with the wider community in developing awareness and understanding of dementia. A few of the projects were addressing intergenerational dimensions of dementia awareness and were working with schools, or were planning to develop such work. In working with a range of local partners many projects were deliberately engaging with the NHS in general and with GPs in particular to increase diagnosis rates. The report concludes that equipping people with the skills and understanding to respond to the needs of people with dementia has great potential to bring about transformational change and to enable genuine social inclusion.

The liveable lives study: understanding everyday help and support: report

ANDERSON Simon, BROWNLIE Julie, MILNE Elisabeth-Jane
2015

This study highlights an overlooked component of social cohesion – everyday acts of informal help and support within communities. While such acts are often mundane and practical - small loans, lifts, help with shopping - they can also have a significant emotional dimension. Although these acts are often simple, navigating them is not: the researchers find that opposing moral forces complicate this picture. Concepts of the ‘deserving’, of stoicism and the imperative to help others all feature in this study. Key points include: the character of informal support among family, friends and even strangers is shaped by the social and physical characteristics of areas but also by the narratives that attach to them; in the often unspoken moral framework underpinning these interactions, both reciprocity (giving back) and mutuality (where both parties benefit from the interaction) are important elements; public policy needs to recognise both the interactional complexity and the emotional significance of everyday help and support. In the context of political debate around austerity and the scope of the state, the infrastructural qualities of such relationships need to be recognised. While such support makes possible other aspects of social life, it also requires maintenance and repair in its own right.

Results 291 - 300 of 421

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News

My Guide: new case example

My Guide: new case example My Guide is a sighted guiding service, started by The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association (Guide Dogs), in which trained volunteers assist blind and partially sighted adults to get out and about, thus helping to prevent social isolation.
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