#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 31 - 40 of 707

The After Party evaluation report on a socially distanced care home project: March – July 2020

MAGIC ME
2020

This evaluation summarises outcomes for those involved in The After Party project, including care home residents and staff, volunteers, artists and staff from the care providers; and provides a short overview of Magic Me’s Cocktail in Care Homes (CICH) project, with a focus on the context of how The After Party began. The study also includes learning and suggestions for future work, in light of outcomes and learning from The After Party. For over 10 years Magic Me trained volunteers who were seeking connections with their local communities to come into their local care homes and have a party with residents. The After Party was developed as a way of keeping up the links with these key CICH sites during the pandemic, in place of the planned last few parties to mark the end of the CICH programme. Each month, After Party care partners received newsletters from Magic Me, which included artist actions and activities, alongside personalised messages from CICH Volunteers. After Party ‘care packages’ were sent via post by the artists, which included creative activities and resources, physical items, i.e. letters, artworks and/ or physical representations of artworks produced by volunteers and the wider public who have taken part in the creative activities throughout the month. They are physical mementos for residents, staff and the home/scheme. The evaluation found that Magic Me provided very easy to use care packages which met the needs of residents, were helpful to care staff, motivated volunteers and generated a great deal of happiness and interaction at a very difficult time. Benefits were felt by all involved. Although it was impossible to create the same sense of connection as when meeting face to face, it seems that The After Party managed to capture some of the energy and colour of the CICH parties and this was transferred into the online project.

Social determinants of health and the role of local government

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2020

This report explores what local government can do to improve health especially by tackling social determinants. Health improvement has always been a fundamental responsibility of local government and this was emphasised further with the transfer of public health responsibilities in 2013. The report argues that there is little use in simply treating people for a health condition if the cause of that condition is not also addressed. Tackling social determinants includes improvements in housing, education and employment as well as ensuring a health promoting environment. Each of the social determinants of health can be improved to give an overall improvement in the health and wellbeing of communities. The roles that local government undertakes to improve health through tackling social determinants include: civic leadership; as employer and anchor institution; securing services; planning and licensing; as champion of prevention. Local government actions and services are centred around the improvement of wellbeing and the prevention of poor outcomes – this is true for children’s services, adult social care and economic development among many others. Opportunities for health improvement by tackling the social determinants of health have been taken up across the country – the report includes detailed examples and case studies illustrating the opportunities for health improvement and what has already been achieved.

Evolving an evidence‐based model for homelessness prevention

OUDSHOORN Abe, et al
2020

While some progress has been made in addressing chronic homelessness through supportive models, a comprehensive solution for housing loss must include prevention. The purpose of this article is twofold: to conduct a review of the literature on the domains of the Framework for Homelessness Prevention; and to use literature on the concept of quaternary prevention, preventing the harms of service provision, to theorise an additional domain. The Framework for Homelessness Prevention draws upon theory from public health exploring primary, secondary and tertiary prevention, and also integrates primordial prevention. This leads to a typology of homelessness prevention that incorporates the following five domains: (a) Structural prevention; (b) Systems prevention; (c) Early intervention; (d) Eviction prevention; and (e) Housing stability. By systematically reviewing the literature we build out the evidence‐base supporting these domains. The team used research databases, internet searches and retrospective reference list reviews to identify high‐quality journal articles on prevention, which were then sorted by level of prevention. Through this process, we evolved our thinking on the Framework in considering that quaternary prevention was not initially included. Therefore, we explored the literature related to quaternary prevention in the context of homelessness and offer a sixth domain for the Framework: Empowerment. Ultimately, a comprehensive Framework for Homelessness Prevention will support communities and governments to more effectively prevent homelessness through upstream approaches.

Health matters: physical activity-prevention and management of long-term conditions

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2020

A professional resource for local authorities and healthcare professionals on physical activity for the prevention and management of long-term conditions. One in three adults in England live with a long-term health condition and they are twice as likely to be amongst the least physically active. However, evidence shows that regular physical activity can help prevent or manage many common conditions such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers. It also helps keep symptoms under control, prevent additional conditions from developing, and reduce inequalities. This guidance examines the health benefits of physical activity; its wider role and benefits, including social and community development and economic benefits; the scale of physical inactivity and the implications of health inequality; and the barriers to physical activity for those with long-term conditions. The resource also signposts to additional physical activity resources, programmes and campaigns for the public and to initiatives and training for healthcare professionals.

CLS Evidence and Learning Briefings 2020. Paper 1: programme findings and lessons about what makes Community Led Support work well for people and places across the UK

BROWN Helen, et al
2020

One of six briefings sharing evaluation findings and lessons from a project to explore the impacts of community led support across the UK, a place-based approach to achieving change in health and social care services, through working closely with local communities and partners in the voluntary, community, business and public sectors. The briefing highlights learning in relation to: local approaches to implementation; effective local leadership; the people community led support is reaching; and whether community led support deliver better outcomes for the same or less resource; and the factors that help to sustain it. The paper highlights five key messages, which include: the importance of understanding local context and knowing what works in each place, who the local players are and how best to work with them; and having the right kind of leadership, at all levels and across the system.

Total transformation of care and support

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2017

This updated version of 'Total transformation of care and support: future of care', originally published in 2016, looks at how transformed and integrated health and care could improve outcomes and cost effectiveness of services. It outlines five areas where transformation needs to take place and where health and care systems can help older and disabled people build a good quality life. It identifies six well-evidenced models, which demonstrate how to combine scarce state resources with the capacity of individuals, families and communities. Using data from Birmingham City Council, it explores the potential for scaling up these six schemes, modelling their outcomes, costs and estimated financial benefits. It also highlights key enablers that could help areas implement each scheme. The models cover an initiative to help isolated older people; the Living Well scheme to improve resilience amongst older people; a service to support adults with learning disabilities to become independent; Shared Lives; a scheme to improve hospital discharge, and support for people following a hospital stay. Appendices include a template to help structure conversations with local citizens and stakeholders about transforming. It is the third of SCIE's Future of care series, which aims to stimulate discussion amongst policy-makers and planners about the future of care and support.

Impact of social prescribing to address loneliness: a mixed methods evaluation of a national social prescribing programme

FOSTER Alexis, et al
2020

Loneliness is considered a global public health issue because of its detrimental impact on physical and mental health but little is known about which interventions can reduce loneliness. One potential intervention is social prescribing, where a link worker helps service‐users to access appropriate support such as community activities and social groups. Some qualitative studies have identified that social prescribing may help to reduce service‐users’ loneliness. Given this, the British Red Cross (a third sector organisation) developed and delivered a national social prescribing service in the United Kingdom to support people who were experiencing, or at risk of, loneliness. Service‐users could receive up to 12 weeks of support from a link worker. A mixed methods study was conducted to understand the impact of the support on loneliness, and to identify the facilitators and barriers to service delivery. The study included: (a) analysis of quantitative data collected routinely between May 2017 and December 2019 (n = 10,643) including pre‐post analysis of UCLA data (n = 2,250) and matched comparator work to measure changes in loneliness; (b) semi‐structured interviews with service‐users, link workers and volunteers (n = 60) and (c) a Social Return on Investment Analysis. The majority of the service‐users (72.6%, n = 1634/2250) felt less lonely after receiving support. The mean change in UCLA score was −1.84 (95% CI −1.91 to −1.77) of a maximum change of 6.00 (decrease indicates an improvement). Additional benefits included improved wellbeing, increased confidence and life having more purpose. The base case analysis estimated a social return on investment of £3.42 per £1 invested in the service. Having skilled link workers and support tailored to individual needs appeared key. However, challenges included utilising volunteers, meeting some service‐users’ needs in relation to signposting and sustaining improvements in loneliness. Nonetheless, the service appeared successful in supporting service‐users experiencing loneliness.

Loneliness and social isolation interventions for older adults: a scoping review of reviews

FAKOYA Olujoke A., MCCORRY Noleen K., DONNELLY Michael
2020

Background: Loneliness and social isolation are growing public health concerns in our ageing society. Whilst these experiences occur across the life span, 50% of individuals aged over 60 are at risk of social isolation and one-third will experience some degree of loneliness later in life. The aim of this scoping review was to describe the range of interventions to reduce loneliness and social isolation among older adults that have been evaluated; in terms of intervention conceptualisation, categorisation, and components. Methods: Three electronic databases (CINAHL, Embase and Medline) were systematically searched for relevant published reviews of interventions for loneliness and social isolation. Inclusion criteria were: review of any type, published in English, a target population of older people and reported data on the categorisation of loneliness and/or social isolation interventions. Data extracted included: categories of interventions and the reasoning underpinning this categorisation. The methodology framework proposed by Arskey and O’Malley and further developed by Levac, et al. was used to guide the scoping review process. Results: A total of 33 reviews met the inclusion criteria, evaluating a range of interventions targeted at older people residing in the community or institutionalised settings. Authors of reviews included in this paper often used the same terms to categorise different intervention components and many did not provide a clear definition of these terms. There were inconsistent meanings attributed to intervention characteristics. Overall, interventions were commonly categorised on the basis of: 1) group or one-to-one delivery mode, 2) the goal of the intervention, and 3) the intervention type. Several authors replicated the categorisation system used in previous reviews. Conclusion: Many interventions have been developed to combat loneliness and social isolation among older people. The individuality of the experience of loneliness and isolation may cause difficulty in the delivery of standardised interventions. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to addressing loneliness or social isolation, and hence the need to tailor interventions to suit the needs of individuals, specific groups or the degree of loneliness experienced. Therefore, future research should be aimed at discerning what intervention works for whom, in what particular context and how.

Loneliness and isolation in long-term care and the COVID-19 pandemic

SIMARD Joyce, VOLICER Ladislav
2020

Editorial. In all countries affected by COVID-19, the message that is being sent by government officials and medical experts is “stay at home” and “isolate in place.” The isolation is especially difficult for people living in nursing homes and assisted living communities. This article provides some easy to implement ideas, with little or no cost or hiring additional staff, and can decrease the loneliness of residents in nursing homes or assisted living communities The article concludes that preventing loneliness in institutionalized persons is at least as important as helping them with personal hygiene. This is especially important during the COVID-19 pandemic when residents must be protected from contact with other individuals to reduce the risk of infection. Implementation of some of the strategies listed in this article requires education of staff members and supply of required items; however, this effort can significantly improve the quality of life of residents affected by pandemic restrictions.

Delivering neighbourhood-level integrated care in Norfolk

COMMUNITY NETWORK
2020

This case study illustrates how integrated services are being delivered in Norfolk. Norfolk Community Health and Care NHS Trust’s vision is to improve the quality of people’s lives in their homes and community through the best in integrated health and social care. The trust works predominantly with 14 primary care networks (PCNs) across the area served by Norfolk and Waveney Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), and with the Norfolk and Waveney Health and Care Partnership at system level. This includes collaborating with three acute trusts, one mental health trust, Norfolk County Council and the East of England Ambulance Service Trust. Examples of collaborative working include rapid assessment frailty team; early intervention vehicles, involving occupational therapists working with emergency medical technicians; Norfolk escalation avoidance team; and a high intensity user service. Key lessons emerging from this case study are: effective collaborative working requires good relationships across the board; do not underestimate the differences in culture and working practices between different organisations; invest in ensuring there is the right technology available for staff to use; engage with staff in a meaningful way to develop strategies to improve their health and wellbeing as this in turn will lead to improvement in services; and invest in pilot projects to test out integrated working between organisations but plan for how they can be maintained long term.

Results 31 - 40 of 707

#EXCLUDE#
News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
Related SCIE content
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#