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Results 31 - 40 of 583

Connecting communities and healthcare: making social prescribing work for everyone

DAVISON Ewan
2019

This paper provides insights and examples from the community and voluntary sector on how social prescribing can improve people's health and wellbeing. It highlights key learning for social prescribing practice, which includes: the need to establish good relationships with GPs and other referrers, recruiting Link workers with a blend of experience and knowledge, and looking after their wellbeing; and providing activities that people want and services that meet their needs. The paper also examines some of the wider system challenges and offer examples of solutions our grant holders are developing and testing. It will be useful for those who are thinking of designing new social prescribing schemes or expanding or improving existing ones.

Active ingredients: the Aesop planning and evaluation model for arts with a social purpose

AESOP, BOP Consulting
2018

This short paper outlines a logic model developed for the planning and evaluation of the Dance to Health project, with suggestions of how it can be used in practice. The project aimed to develop a better understanding of the ways in which arts interventions in health and social contexts actually work, and to improve the ways these are designed and their impacts measured. The Active Ingredients logic model, includes: Inputs - such as the specific arts practice, venues and health or social care setting; and Outputs - volume of arts sessions and number of beneficiaries. It also summarises a set of ‘Active Ingredients’ in participatory arts work, which are summarised under the headings of ‘Engaging and Imagining’. The model will be useful for those involved in the evaluation and planning of arts interventions, as well as policymakers interested in arts as interventions.

Local Area Coordination: summative evaluation

LUNT Neil, BAINBRIDGE Laura
2019

The results from the third phase of an evaluation of a Local Area Coordination approach developed in York, which involved the introduction of three Local Area Coordinators. The evaluation aimed to identify early outcomes at the level of individuals, families, community and system (including project objectives and cost effectiveness). It also aimed to identify emerging insights and potential future opportunities for data collection, and longitudinal approaches to Local Area Coordination outcomes over a longer timeframe. Methods used included analysis of performance data, review of documentation and interviews with Local Area Coordinators, Programme Managers and community organisations. The findings show that Local Area Coordination is operating as intended, and is providing support to people not previously known to services. People also welcome long-term focus of Local Area Coordinator work. It also identified examples of real changes as a consequence of Local Area Support, including preventative interventions and helping families navigate complex and challenging circumstances.

The 'front door' to adult social care

AUDITOR GENERAL FOR WALES
2019

To meet the aims of the Social Services and Well-being (Wales) Act 2014, local authorities need to have created a comprehensive ‘front door’ to social care and to have in places an effective Information, Advice and Assistance (IAA) service. This audit report considers the effectiveness of IAA services in Wales, the availability of preventative and community-based support, and the systems put in place to ensure those who need care and support or are at risk are identified and helped. It also considers the impact of the front door on demand for social care and in respect of improving wellbeing. Although local authorities are supporting people to access a wider range of support options, there is a lack of comprehensive understanding of what is available and the preventative services that are needed. It also found that carers are still not getting equal access to the services they need. Based on the findings, the report concludes that councils are preventing social-care demand, but there is variation in the availability, accessibility and quality of information, advice and assistance services. It makes recommendations to help improve access to information, advice and assistance services.

Review of integrated care: focus on falls

HEALTHCARE INSPECTORATE WALES
2019

Based on a review of integrated care for older people who are at risk of experiencing a fall in Wales, this report highlights learning for staff and for health and social care managers. It focuses on services to help people avoid a fall and how to support people who have had a fall, providing examples of desirable and undesirable pathways through the health and care system. It focuses on the three areas: prevention of falls and promotion of independence, for people living in their own home or in a care home; response to falls when they happen in the community, either for someone living at home or in a care home; and following attendance at hospital due to a fall. It also highlights key themes identified from the review and how the affected service users, service providers and commissioners. The review identified examples of good practice but also found a lack of co-ordination and communication between health, social care and voluntary services could often be a barrier to delivering good quality care. The report has been informed by evidence from six individual falls services, the views of staff and older people. It makes eight recommendations for the Welsh Government, health boards and local authorities. The include a National Falls Framework for Wales, to standardise the approach to preventing, treating and reabling older people who are at risk of falling or have already fallen The report will be relevant for service providers, commissioners and service users.

Men's Sheds: a conceptual exploration of the causal pathways for health and well‐being

KELLY Danielle, et al
2019

Although men have a lower life expectancy than women, and are more susceptible to illness, they have been found to be less likely to engage in health‐seeking behaviour. Men's Sheds, as a gendered intervention, has been identified as an effective way to engage men in meaningful activity and gain social support from others. However, links between sheds and health and well‐being are not well‐documented, and evidence is lacking of the potential causal pathways to health generation. This study aims to develop a plausible empirically based causal theory of how Men's Sheds influence the health and well‐being of their participants and to set out future research directions to test this theory. Drawing on a scoping review of academic, peer‐reviewed journal articles published between 1990 and 2018, potential causal linkages between shed activity and health and well‐being outcomes are synthesised into a logic model framework. Sixteen relevant peer‐reviewed journal were identified from the academic literature. The data from the articles are predominantly self‐reported, and characterised by small sample sizes and/ or low response rates. Further, information is lacking on the demographics of Men's Shed participants and the contexts in which they exist. Most notably, while there is some evidence on the potential mental health and social well‐being impacts of shed activities, physical health is less documented. The study shows that there is a lack of reliable and systematic evidence of the potential causal pathways between Men's Shed activities and health and well‐being outcomes. In order to address research gaps, further research is required to test and develop the proposed theory and logic model.

Impact of individualised music listening intervention on persons with dementia: A systematic review of randomised controlled trials

GAVIOLA Minah Amor, et al
2019

Objective: To summarise the evidence regarding the impact of individualised music listening on persons with dementia. Methods: Six electronic databases (CINAHL, Medline, ProQuest, PsycINFO, Music Periodicals and Cochrane) were searched up to July 2018 for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the efficacy of individualised music listening compared to other music and non–music‐based interventions. Results: Four studies were included. Results showed evidence of a positive impact of individualised music listening on behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSDs) including agitation, anxiety and depression and physiological outcomes. Evidence for other outcomes such as cognitive function and quality of life was limited. Conclusions: The limited evidence suggests individualised music listening has comparable efficacy to more resource‐intensive interventions. However, there was a small number of RCTs and some outcomes were evaluated by a single study. This limits the conclusions drawn, warranting more RCTs evaluating other outcomes beyond the BPSDs.

Combatting social isolation and increasing social participation of older adults through the use of technology: a systematic review of existing evidence

BAKER Steven, et al
2018

Objectives: There are growing concerns that social isolation presents risks to older people's health and well‐being. Thus, the objective of the review was to explore how technology is currently being utilised to combat social isolation and increase social participation, hence improving social outcomes for older people. Methods: A systematic review of the literature was conducted across the social science and human‐computer interaction databases. Results: A total of 36 papers met the inclusion criteria and were analysed using a four‐step process. Findings were threefold, suggesting that: (i) technologies principally utilised social network services and touch‐screen technologies; (ii) social outcomes are often ill‐defined or not defined at all; and (iii) methodologies used to evaluate interventions were often limited and small‐scale. Conclusion: Results suggest a need for studies that examine new and innovative forms of technology, evaluated with rigorous methodologies, and drawing on clear definitions about how these technologies address social isolation/participation. Policy Impact: This systematic review explores how technology is currently being utilised to combat social isolation and increase social participation for older people. A unique aspect of this review is that it incorporates smaller design studies and prototypes. These insights will benefit those considering the potential for information and communication technologies to contribute to older adults’ health and well‐being. Practice Impact: This systematic review explores how technology is currently being utilised to combat social isolation and increase social participation for older people. Insights from the review will benefit practitioners seeking to understand the broad range of technologies that are being applied to these issues, and the common benefits and challenges associated with each approach.

People doing it for themselves

COMMUNITY CATALYSTS
2019

Shares key findings and learning from the first phase of a project to explore the motivations and achievements of ‘people doing it for themselves’. The project focuses on older or disabled people who need care and support, and have decided to establish something new or lead local change. The project worked with over 20 individuals and groups to find out what helped them do it for themselves, the challenges the faced, and the impact their activity is having on themselves and their communities. The project also engaged with 10 decision makers and commissioners to identify good practice and understand how local authorities and others can be supported to encourage people in their area to do it for themselves. The project found that when people do it for themselves it can have a positive impact on their lives, the lives of those around them and their community, and also on local and national policy and practice. The report shows found that personal qualities combined with aspiration and inspiration are key motivators for people. Potential barriers to action can include effective support, funding or other resources, equipment, transport and accessibility. It concludes by highlighting a number of factors that can encourage more people to ‘do it for themselves’. The detailed stories of the 20 people and groups involved in the project can be read in an accompanying appendix.

North London Cares and South London Cares evaluation: final report

HITCHIN John, PETIE Olivia, NORRLANDER Amanda
2019

An evaluation Love Your Neighbour and Social Clubs, two programmes to reduce loneliness, improve intergenerational relationships and create a greater sense of community. The programmes, which aimed to bring together people of different generations to spend time together, were delivered across the London based charities North London Cares and South London Cares as part of The Cares Family’s model. The Social clubs programme brings together groups of younger and older neighbours to get involved in activities and socialise; and Love Your Neighbour focuses on one-to-one friendships between older and younger neighbours. The evaluation examines the outcomes for young and older neighbours, the strengths and weaknesses of the model, and highlights the challenges of evaluating community-based models. The evaluation found that overall, The Cares Family model is contributing to positive outcomes in four areas: reduced loneliness and isolation, particularly for older neighbours; improved understanding across the generations; a sense of belonging; and an increased connection to self.

Results 31 - 40 of 583

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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