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All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 31 - 40 of 636

The impact of social prescribing services on service users: a systematic review of the evidence

PESCHENY Julia Vera, RANDHAWA Gurch, PAPPAS Yannis
2019

Background: Social prescribing initiatives are widely implemented in the UK National Health Service to integrate health and social care. Social prescribing is a service in primary care that links patients with non-medical needs to sources of support provided by the community and voluntary sector to help improve their health and wellbeing. Such programmes usually include navigators, who work with referred patients and issue onward referrals to sources of non-medical support. This systematic review aimed to assess the evidence of service user outcomes of social prescribing programmes based on primary care and involving navigators. Methods: 11 databases, the grey literature, and the reference lists of relevant studies were searched to identify the available evidence on the impact of social prescribing on service users. Searches were limited to literature written in English. No date restrictions were applied, and searches were conducted to June 2018. Findings were synthesised narratively, employing thematic analysis. The Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool Version 2011 was used to evaluate the methodological quality of included studies. Results: Sixteen studies met the inclusion criteria. The evidence base is mixed, some studies found improvements in health and wellbeing, health-related behaviours, self-concepts, feelings, social contacts and day-to-day functioning post-social prescribing, whereas others have not. The review also shows that the evaluation methodologies utilised were variable in quality. Conclusion: In order to assess the success of social prescribing services, more high quality and comparable evaluations need to be conducted in the future.

Preventative services for older people: current approaches and future opportunities

WISTOW Gerald, LEWIS Helen
1997

Paper written as a background to a seminar on preventative services to older people. Outlines the issues and goes on to look at: what preventative services are; what obstacles to well being are faced by older people; what services there should be; what is currently available; what blockages there are preventing such services being available more widely; what is known about the effectiveness of such services; and key messages for policy makers.

Commissioning for health and well-being: an introduction

GLASBY Jon
2012

Commissioning is now a key task for health and social care. While commissioning was important under New Labour, it seems set to be even more fundamental now as commissioners have to make decisions about future services in an era of austerity. This book explores what commissioning is, where it has come from, and where it might be going. It comprises a compilation of separate papers from a wide range of experts from fields including health care, social care, and local government. The book starts with an overview of policy and the history of commissioning. The next group of chapters takes the reader through key stages of the commissioning cycle, considering issues such as decision making and priority setting, procurement and market management, commissioning for service resilience, and commissioning for quality and outcomes. The final 4 chapters pick up on cross-cutting themes, such as the economics of commissioning, user involvement, joint commissioning and commissioning in an era of personalisation. The book is likely to be of interest to everyone involved in the planning and delivery of health and social care including social policy students, health and social care practitioners, managers and policy makers.

The impact of telehealth on use of hospital care and mortality: research summary

STEVENTON Adam, BARDSLEY Martin
2012

The impact of telehealth on hospital use, patient admission and mortality were evaluated in three trial sites in England. The sites were from the Department of Health’s Whole System Demonstrator pilots. The evaluation focused on the use of telehealth to people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes or heart failure. It used a large randomised controlled trial which included over 3,000 participants (1,584 control and 1,570 intervention) in which groups of patients either received the telehealth intervention or acted as controls by receiving their usual care. Statistically significant differences in rates of emergency hospital admission and mortality were found during the twelve months of the trial between control and intervention groups. For intervention patients, the overall costs of hospital care (including emergency admissions, elective admissions and outpatient attendances) were £188 per patient less than those for controls. However, this cost difference was not statistically significant. As well as summarising the main findings the research summary highlights the limitations of the research and other issues that need to be considered in relation to the findings.

Evidence, insight, or intuition? Investment decisions in the commissioning of prevention services for older people

MILLER Robin, et al
2013

English adult social care commissioners are expected to make ‘evidence based’ decisions on how best to invest public sector funding. This study explores the types of evidence that commissioners use in relation to prevention services for older people and the other factors that influence their investment decisions. A study of local authority Directors of Adult Social Services (DASSs) was used to identify three local prevention interventions. Semi-structured interviews with leads for these interventions explored the evidence and other factors that influenced the investment process. Commissioners drew on a variety of published evidence, in particular that deriving from central government and its regional representative bodies, and third sector organizations with specialist knowledge. Local evidence was also generated through the undertaking of pilots and gathering of performance data. Alongside these ‘rational’ decision-making processes were strong political, personal, and relational dimensions related primarily to the influence of elected members and the hierarchical power of DASSs. Capturing experiential evidence and knowledge of service users and frontline practitioners, being clear about expected impacts and monitoring accordingly, and using recognized evaluation tools would provide further local evidence and enable better comparison and sharing across local authorities.

Preventing need and maximising independence: policy scope

RESEARCH IN PRACTICE FOR ADULTS
2013

This policy briefing provides a summary of policy activity in preventive servcies in adult social care, while identifying the key issues, trends and possible future policy direction. The implications for professionals working at a local level and the benefits for service users are also considered.

Building community capacity: making an economic case

KNAPP Martin, et al
2010

The Coalition Government’s vision, the Big Society, includes ideas for increasing local involvement, moving the provision of services and decision-making closer to local communities. Volunteering is strongly encouraged, as is the creation of social enterprises and other organisations with charitable status which may be able to take over local services currently run by the state. Independent community organisers are also proposed as part of these new developments. This small research project aimed to investigate the economic consequences which follow from initiatives of this type. The approach taken was to use the findings from previous studies, combined with the expertise of people delivering services and shaping initiatives, to produce simple simulations. Each simulation sought to mimic the pathways that people might follow, whether through services or through ‘life events’ such as getting a job, or in terms of changes in their wellbeing. The aim was to investigate the economic impact of the community capacity-building initiative compared to what would happen in the absence of such an initiative. The study covers 3 examples of ways in which community capacity can be built: time banks; befriending; and debt and benefits advice from community navigators. It focuses on the costs of these projects and on the monetary value of some of their consequences. These calculations demonstrate that each of these community initiatives generate net economic benefits in quite a short time period.

Social identification moderates cognitive health and well-being following story- and song-based reminiscence

HASLAM Catherine, et al
2014

Objectives: Reminiscence is a popular intervention for seniors, but, with mixed evidence supporting its efficacy, questions have been raised about the mechanisms underlying improvement. The present paper addresses this question by investigating the degree to which health effects depend on the development of a shared sense of group identification. This is examined in the context of traditional story-based reminiscence as well as novel forms of song-based reminiscence.Method: As the focus of a manualised intervention, 40 participants were randomly assigned to secular song (n = 13), religious song (n = 13), or standard story reminiscence (n = 14) groups. These were run over six weeks with cognitive performance, anxiety, and life satisfaction measured before and after the intervention. Measures of group fit were included to examine whether social identification contributed to outcomes.Results: No evidence of change emerged over time as a function of intervention form alone, but analysis of identification data revealed significant interactions with the type of reminiscence group. Specifically, initial fit with the story reminiscence group was associated with enhanced cognitive outcomes and greater life satisfaction, while fit with the religious song reminiscence group was associated with greater life satisfaction and less anxiety.Conclusion: These findings show that group identification is a key moderator through which reminiscence promotes health outcomes. Implications for theory and practice highlight an inherent limitation in randomised controlled trials insofar as they may compromise participants’ group identification.

Prevention: developing a framework for conceptualising and evaluating outcomes of preventive services for older people

GODFREY Mary
2001

Focusing on older people, this article seeks a way to locate prevention within a theoretical model of successful ageing. This conceptualises ageing as involving adaptation to the changing balance between gains and losses over the life course. Successful ageing is perceived as the attainment of valued goals, the minimisation of losses and maximisation of gains through the linked processes of selective compensation and optimisation. Preventive services may be conceived as resources to be drawn upon to support compensatory strategies. Outcomes and effectiveness of services may be evaluated in terms of whether they facilitate/ allow older people to achieve valued goals. In developing and evaluating preventive services in social care the question is what contribution do specific services make in optimising gains and compensating for the losses that accompany ageing? This framework is explored in respect of two areas ripe for secondary prevention services and strategies - bereavement and instrumental support in the home.

'The billion dollar question': embedding prevention in older people's services: 10 'high impact' changes

ALLEN Kerry, GLASBY Jon
2010

There is a need to invest more fully and strategically in both prevention and rehabilitation for older people, to help them stay healthier, more independent and more socially included for longer and to recover these capacities as fully as possible when they do require hospital treatment. While there is growing recognition that only a more preventative agenda will be sufficient to respond to current and future pressures, there is much less clarity about how to do this in practice. This paper seeks to identify the most promising ‘10 high impact changes’ with regards to prevention in older people’s services. The paper draws on two main sources. The first is an EU review of prevention and long-term care in older people’s services across 14 European counties known as Interlinks. The second key source is a recent review of the social and economic benefits of adult social care, commissioned by the Department of Health and Downing Street. This paper identifies and reviews the following 10 prevention strategies: promoting healthy lifestyles; vaccination; screening; falls prevention; housing adaptations and practical support; telecare and technology; intermediate care; reablement; partnership working; and personalisation.

Results 31 - 40 of 636

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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