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All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 31 - 40 of 514

Health and Wellbeing Innovation Commission Inquiry: social connections and loneliness

BEACH Brian
2018

This report reflects on how innovation can help foster and improve social connections to the benefit for all people in an ageing society. It also sets out examples of effective innovation in the area of social connections, opportunities and barriers to further innovation, and recommendations to support innovation. The report is based on an oral evidence session where expert witnesses gave evidence to the commissioners and research from ILC-UK. It is one of four publications from ILC-UK’s Health and Wellbeing Innovation Commission Inquiry, which examined the potential for innovation in the areas of health and wellbeing to ensure that services remain sustainable, address needs efficiently, and contribute to positive experiences in later life.

Building age-friendly neighbourhoods in Greater Manchester: evidence from the Ambition for Ageing programme

THORLEY Jessica
2018

This report draws on research and learning gathered from the Ambition for Ageing programme, which aimed to help to create more age-friendly places and empower people to live fulfilling lives as they age. Using data and information collected from the programme, the report looks at what older people across Greater Manchester thinks makes a neighbourhood age-friendly. It draws on the: event feedback, participant and volunteer survey responses and a snapshot of case studies. The programme identified key themes for building age-friendly neighbourhoods. These are: the need for positive social connections and community cohesion; participation and meeting opportunities; good accessibility, facilities and transport; community spaces and resources; feelings of safety and security; and available information with effective communication.

What makes an age-friendly neighbourhood: briefing

AMBITION FOR AGEING
2018

Drawing on the findings from the Ambition for Ageing programme, this briefing explores what older people across Greater Manchester feel makes an age-friendly neighbourhood. Their responses covered six main themes that interlink to make an age-friendly neighbourhood: Community, integration and belonging; Meeting and participation opportunities; Community resources and spaces; Accessibility, transport and facilities; Feelings of safety and security; and Information and Communication. The Ambition of Ageing programme aimed to find out what works in reducing social isolation by taking an asset-based approach and creating age-friendly communities.

How we build age-friendly neighbourhoods: briefing

AMBITION FOR AGEING
2018

Drawing on the findings from the Ambition for Ageing programme in Manchester, this briefing offers practical guidance for practitioners on how to work with older people to build age-friendly communities using an asset-based approach. It highlights age-friendly activities taking place across Greater Manchester and explores successes and challenges encountered by the Ambition for Ageing programme. The briefing highlights the importance of events and activities being designed and led by older people, for activities to be inclusive and reflect the diversity of the population, the benefits of inter-generational work, and the need to re-thinking the use of community spaces.

What works in social prescribing?

CORDIS BRIGHT
2019

Based on a review of the literature, this evidence summary highlights the potential of social prescribing services to combat the root social causes of ill health and alleviate demand on healthcare services. The review provides a definition of social prescribing and outlines the key ingredients for successful social prescribing services. These key ingredients cover: funding, buy-in of health professionals, referral process, link workers, patient-centred care, collaborative working and integration between different sectors. The review also explores potential barriers to the widespread adoption of social prescribing services. It notes that robust evidence for social prescribing remains weak, with the majority of evaluations small in scale and poorly designed.

Londoners said: an analysis of the Thrive LDN community conversations

DAVIE E., et al
2018

This report presents feedback from 17 community workshops, delivered by Thrive LDN in partnership with the Mental Health Foundation, which asked Londoners how they could be better supported to be mentally healthy. The workshops were attended by over 1,000 Londoners including those who commission, provide and use services. In the workshops Londoners gave their views on how Thrive LDN's six aspirations to improve mental health could be delivered. The report includes quotations from attendees. The solutions shared common themes of spreading knowledge, skills and support so that people can better look after themselves and their neighbours. It shows that as well as wanting access to services, Londoners want to be able to help themselves. The report makes recommendations based on the discussions. These include: the development of a network of community champions to tackle isolation; using technological platforms to inform people about support and activities in their community; supporting the development of non-clinical crisis and other wellbeing centres; and providing support for parents through peer-parenting groups.

A feasibility study of facilitated reminiscence for people living with dementia: report

RYAN Assumpta, et al
2018

Reports on a feasibility study to investigate the effects of a home based, individual reminiscence intervention using an iPad app for people living with dementia and their family carers. The study design had three phases. Phase 1: A User Development Group comprising a paired sample of 6 people living with dementia and their family carers who worked with the research team to design and test the technology; Phase 2: Testing of the developed app with a paired sample of 30 people living with mild to moderate dementia and their family carers (n=60). Participants used the app for 12 weeks at home. Questionnaires which examined the impact of reminiscence on mutuality, wellbeing, quality of life and quality of the relationship between participants living with dementia and their family carers were collected at the beginning, middle and end points of the study. Health economics data were also collected to understand cost effectiveness. Phase 3: Individual interviews with a sample of participants (n=32) to explore their experience of the intervention. The results found that people living with dementia used the app independently and more frequently than their carers. They also showed an increase in the quality of caregiving relationships and emotional well‐being for people living with dementia. Although there was no significant change for carers over the course of the study, the intervention improved the caring relationship and was seen as an enjoyable way to care for themselves and their loved one.

A systematic review to investigate dramatherapy group work with working age adults who have a mental health problem

BOURNE Jane, ANDERSEN-WARREN Madeline, HACKETT Simon
2018

This study investigated the effects of dramatherapy group work with adults between the ages of 18 and 65 years, who have mental health problems. A systematic review was undertaken using a meta-ethnography to synthesise the existing relevant research. Database searches identified 111 records, from which 12 were included in the review. There was a combined total of n = 194 participants from eleven of the studies; plus one study that did not give exact participant numbers. The included studies were either qualitative or mixed method, with a variety of designs: case studies, interviews, focus groups, observations, questionnaires, evaluations, and use of a variety of measurement tools. There was a range of populations, including: adults with intellectual disabilities, adult offenders, community service users, and in-patients. Participants were from a number of different settings. Overall findings were encouraging and included; improvements in social interaction, improved self- awareness, empowerment and social interaction. No negative effects were reported.

'What would life be: without a song or a dance, what are we?' A report from the Commission on Dementia and Music

BOWELL Sally, BAMFORD Sally-Marie
2018

This report examines the current landscape of using therapeutic music with people with dementia, outlines the value and benefits of music therapy, and looks at what needs to be done to ensure that everyone with dementia is able to access music. Informed by the Commission on Dementia and Music, the report brings together a wide range of evidence, including academic papers, written and oral evidence, and evidence from site visits. The evidence shows that music can help to minimise symptoms of dementia, such as agitation and can help tackle anxiety and depression. Evidence also shows that music can help improves the quality of life for people with dementia by increasing social interaction and decreasing stress. The report also shows that although the dementia and music environment is supported by a dedicated network of individuals and organisations, they work in a complex and poorly coordinate system. The field is also defined by sporadic access, with only relatively few people with dementia having access. It concludes that the sector would benefit from increased funding, further cost-effective research to boost recognition and funding, and increased public awareness about the benefits of music. The report includes recommendations to help improve access to music for people with dementia.

The community navigators study: loneliness in people with complex anxiety or depression

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH RESEARCH. School for Social Care Research
2018

The summary findings of a study which developed a Community Navigators programme to reduce loneliness for people with anxiety or depression using secondary mental health services. The study also explores the views of participants and mental health services to the intervention and the feasibility of evaluating the programme using a randomised controlled trial. Forty participants with anxiety or depression were recruited and randomised to an intervention group (n=30), who received the programme in addition to standard care, or a control group (n=10), who received standard care and written information about local community resources. Community Navigators were recruited to help people develop new social connections, and to revive or develop existing social relationships with the aim of reducing feelings of loneliness. The study found the intervention was well received by service users. Outcomes indicate that the intervention has potential to reduce loneliness and depression.

Results 31 - 40 of 514

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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