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Results 41 - 50 of 744

Ever more needed? The role of the Leeds Neighbourhood Networks during the COVID-19 pandemic

DAYSON Chris, et al
2020

This report draws on the findings of a ‘real time evaluation’ (RTE) of the Leeds Neighbourhood Networks (LNNs) during the pandemic, as a way to understand and share learning about their response. The LNNs aim to support older people to live independently and participate in their communities as they grow older, through a range of activities and services that are provided at a neighbourhood level. The networks have developed over the past 30 years and there are now 37 of them covering the whole city of Leeds. The form, function, activities and services of the networks are diverse, but they share some key characteristics, such as running with the involvement of older people. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic there was a city-wide ambition for a symbiotic relationship between the LNNs and the health and care sector. This was linked the city’s strategic vision to make Leeds the ‘best city in the UK to grow old in’ and recognition of the need for a ‘left shift’ of resources toward prevention and the development community-based resources and assets. Although the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic meant that this progressive policy agenda was placed on hold out of necessity as city partners focussed on addressing the acute needs brought about by the crisis, the pandemic also provided an opportunity for the LNNs to demonstrate their value by being part of this response at a city and neighbourhood level.

Strengths, assets and place - the emergence of Local Area Coordination initiatives in England and Wales

LUNT Neil, BAINBRIDGE Laura, RIPPON Simon
2020

Summary: Local Area Coordination is an approach that emerged during the 1980s and 1990s to support individuals with learning disabilities in rural and metropolitan Western Australia. Offering direct family support, signposting and networking it aimed to improve access to services and promote social inclusion. It leveraged community resources and sought broader transformation through local collaborations and service redesign, as underpinned by a strengths-based philosophy. Scotland introduced a similar model of delivery from the early 2000s for learning disability support. Since 2010, a number of English and Welsh Local Authorities have introduced Local Area Coordination, and in doing so have expanded its support eligibility criteria to include those considered ‘vulnerable’ due to age, frailty, disability, mental health issues and housing precariousness. Findings: This article provides the first review of developments in England and Wales. Drawing upon published evaluation studies it reflects on Local Area Coordination implementation; reviews the existing evidence base and challenges surrounding data collection; and discusses the competing logic of Local Area Coordination in its aim of supporting individual and community improvement of health outcomes and well-being, and of furthering local government civic engagement and participation. Applications: This article points to the challenges and opportunities of implementing such a strength-, assets- and placed-based initiatives within Local Authority social service settings. Embedding Local Area Coordination within Local Authority settings requires skilled political and policy leadership. It balances emerging individual outcomes – health and well-being – with the civic mission (values, control and coproduction), and avoids one being subverted to the other.

Activities outside of the care setting for people with dementia: a systematic review

D'CUNHA Nathan Martin, et al
2020

Objectives To summarise the evidence from interventions investigating the effects of out of care setting activities on people with dementia living in residential aged care. Design A systematic review. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, Scopus, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library) was performed to identify intervention trials published from journal inception to January 2020. Controlled trials, or quasi-experimental trials, which measured pre-intervention, post-intervention or during-intervention outcomes, where the participants were required to leave the care setting to participate in an intervention, were eligible for inclusion. Quality appraisal of the studies was performed following the Cochrane Collaboration’s Risk of Bias or Newcastle-Ottawa Scale tools. Results: Of the 4155 articles screened, 11 articles met the inclusion criteria from 9 different studies. The number of participants in the studies ranged from 6 to 70 people living with dementia and lasted for 3 weeks up to 5 months. The interventions were aquatic exercise, wheelchair cycling, art gallery discussion groups, an intergenerational mentorship programme, horse riding, walking and outdoor gardening. Overall, the studies indicated preliminary evidence of psychological (n=7), physical (n=4) and physiological (n=1) benefits, and all interventions were feasible to conduct away from the aged care facilities. However, the low number of participants in the included studies (n=177), the absence of a control group in all but three studies, and potential for selection bias, limits the generalisability of the findings. Conclusions: Activities outside of the residential aged care setting have the potential to be effective at providing a range of benefits for people living with dementia. Higher quality studies are required to encourage care providers to implement these type of activities in dementia care settings.

Community building guide

BARNWOOD TRUST
2020

This is a hands-on guide to community building, produced by the Community Building team at Barnwood Trust. It draws on extensive and varied experiences from within the team. The guide offers practical guidance and examples of community building techniques – at different stages of connecting people in a place. Throughout this guide there are top tips, ideas boxes and stories to think about. At the end of this guide there is also a toolkit of pragmatic activities and plans that may be useful for putting some of this work into practice. Contents include: foundation – asset-based community development and community building; where to start (discovery stage) – principles in practice, the art of conversation, and ways of starting; what next? (building relationships) – how to gather people; assets and gifts; connecting and mobilising; how to progress? (reflective practice) – self-reflection and support, good help (and knowing when to step back), and value of stories.

Building community capacity and resilience evaluation findings from a two-year practice and research collaboration in Gloucestershire

DYDE Amy, WARDEN Roz, JACQUES Dan
2019

This report presents evaluation findings from a collaboration between four partner organisations in Gloucestershire which sought to promote asset- and strengths-based approaches. Gloucestershire Constabulary, Barnwood Trust, Gloucester City Council, and the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner formed the partnership with the collective aim of working together to empower citizen-led action to make Gloucestershire a great place to live. The following collective objectives united the four partner organisations: healthier communities; improved community safety; welcoming and inclusive neighbourhoods; citizens taking control over their own lives; and places where people can come together. Professionals who participated in the research shared their views on and experiences of working in asset- and strengths-based ways. Findings included: a range of professional and personal impacts, including better knowledge about communities and increased job satisfaction; the importance of organisational culture and sufficient time to meaningfully engage with the community; where the intervention was in the form of workshops rather than secondment, changing practices appeared to be less sustained over time. Evidence of impact for residents and community includes: statistically significant evidence for the value of both professional and personal relationships, and their positive impact on perceptions of community cohesion, wellbeing, life satisfaction and, more broadly, perceptions of the police and fear of crime; all 10 residents who were interviewed identified positive impacts for themselves and/or others in the community, including the value of involvement on feeling able to cope (for example, with a health condition); the role that community involvement, including events and groups, played in contributing to feelings of cohesion in an area.

Ageing Better Isle of Wight: final evaluation report

HARFLETT Naomi
2020

Final evaluation report for Ageing Better Isle of Wight – a five-year Programme funded by the National Lottery Community Fund that aimed to make the Isle of Wight a great place to grow older, encourage better relations between generations, and tackle social isolation and loneliness. Over five years of delivery the AB IOW Programme has had a significant impact across a number of areas and generated substantial learning. 16,836 older people participated in 16 projects across all areas of the Island. These included: care navigators; community navigators; alternative transport; Alzheimer cafe; one-to-one creative sessions for people in residential care; care for carers; digital inclusion; education; men in shed; employment support; mental health peer support; good neighbour scheme; older-preneurs; an online directory of local events and services; singing groups. In total, 11 organisations were directly involved in delivery of the Programme and organisations across the voluntary, public and private sectors Island wide were affected by the impact of the work of the projects. Key areas of impact included: reducing social isolation – for an estimated two thirds of participants levels of social isolation were either reduced or maintained; improving wellbeing – there was a statistically significant increase in the mean wellbeing scores of national evaluation questionnaire respondents, and 50% of respondents participating in AB IOW projects experienced an improvement in wellbeing; value for money – analysis of the costs and the benefits of the projects found that in part due to good use of volunteers and existing community facilities, the projects delivered support, advice and interventions at a low unit cost per participant; becoming an Age Friendly Island – AB IOW has had a notable impact on the voluntary, public and private sectors on the IOW.

Evaluation of Ageing Better Isle of Wight

NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
2020

Final evaluation report for Ageing Better Isle of Wight – a five-year Programme funded by the National Lottery Community Fund that aimed to make the Isle of Wight a great place to grow older, encourage better relations between generations, and tackle social isolation and loneliness. Over five years of delivery the AB IOW Programme has had a significant impact across a number of areas and generated substantial learning. 16,836 older people participated in 16 projects across all areas of the Island. These included: care navigators; community navigators; alternative transport; Alzheimer cafe; one-to-one creative sessions for people in residential care; care for carers; digital inclusion; education; men in shed; employment support; mental health peer support; good neighbour scheme; older-preneurs; an online directory of local events and services; singing groups. In total, 11 organisations were directly involved in delivery of the Programme and organisations across the voluntary, public and private sectors Island wide were affected by the impact of the work of the projects. Key areas of impact included: reducing social isolation – for an estimated two thirds of participants levels of social isolation were either reduced or maintained; improving wellbeing – there was a statistically significant increase in the mean wellbeing scores of national evaluation questionnaire respondents, and 50% of respondents participating in AB IOW projects experienced an improvement in wellbeing; value for money – analysis of the costs and the benefits of the projects found that in part due to good use of volunteers and existing community facilities, the projects delivered support, advice and interventions at a low unit cost per participant; becoming an Age Friendly Island – AB IOW has had a notable impact on the voluntary, public and private sectors on the IOW.

Implementing the Care Act 2014: building social resources to prevent, reduce or delay needs for care and support in adult social care in England

TEW Jerry, et al
2019

This Report is based on research into ‘second wave’ approaches to prevention and capacity building that have become more prominent since the implementation of the Care Act 2014. These approaches involve a fundamental revisioning of the role of local services and seek to maximise resources and opportunities through working in more co-productive ways with citizens, families and communities. The findings are based on a national survey of local authorities and in-depth case study research with stakeholders, beneficiaries and family members in seven local authorities which were promoting one or more ‘second wave’ preventative initiatives. A key findings was that a preventative focus is still relatively new in adult social care and that approaches are often embedded within a variety of strategic initiatives, including: strengths-based models of social work and social care practice (such as 3 Conversations); approaches to social networking and building community capacity (such as Local Area Coordination); mobilising the resources of family and personal networks (through approaches such as Family Group Conferencing, peer support or Community Circles) and targeted ‘upstream’ use of personal budgets. Another finding was that overall, financial pressures were seen as the most important driver towards developing preventative activity, but, at the same time, this was also cited most frequently as the greatest barrier. Other frequently cited barriers to progressing the prevention agenda were competing policy imperatives and, in particular, perceived pressure to make rushed decisions in order to minimise delays in hospital discharge. The report also examines wellbeing outcomes and expenditure. The report makes recommendations for the policy, practice and implementation and evaluation contexts. The reports concludes that there is some strong evidence of the creativity and innovation that is taking place in a significant proportion of local authorities. While progress may not be consistent across the sector, the research shows that a sizable proportion of local authorities have been investing in activity that is designed to increase capacity and capability at individual, family and community levels, and thereby to contribute to preventing, reducing or delaying the need for adult social care services.

Local Area Coordination (IOW) evaluation report: “What is it about Local Area Coordination that makes it work for end users, under what circumstances, how and why?”

MASON James, HARRIS Kevin, RYAN Louise
2019

This evaluation report draws upon the findings of a realist evaluation of the LAC on the Isle of Wight (IOW) to establish how and why the programme worked for people and communities across three demographical areas. As a sample this focused on the first three Local Area Coordinators to mobilise LAC representative of Ryde, Shanklin and Freshwater. The methods selected for this study were made up of Q-method (Watts and Stenner, 2012) and realist interviews. Q-method focuses on subjective viewpoints of its participants asking them to decide what is meaningful and what does (and what does not) have value and significance from their perspective. Q-Method involves developing a set of statements representing a set of viewpoints of certain individuals about an issue or programme. In this case a set of statements about LAC on the IOW were produced and ranked in line with most important to most un-important by end users. These rankings were then analysed to produce holistic narratives illustrating shared viewpoints around how and why LAC worked. This was also supported by realist interviews which sought to further investigate the key mechanisms at play within LAC on the IOW. The findings of the evaluation established that listening, trust and time were consistent across the three Local Area Coordinators sampled in the evaluation. The coordinator also needs to continue to build on relationships with the differing referral groups due to the variety of methods used to make individuals aware of Local Area Coordination. However, it was also quite clear that LAC worked for different end users in different ways with the Q study creating three different subgroups of end users experiencing LAC: subgroup 1 – “I know you are there and that means a lot, but I’m building my own social networks”; subgroup 2 – “Thank you for your support, I’ve come a long way”; subgroup 3 – “I’m moving down the path, but I still need your personalised support”. The findings demonstrate that LAC works for different people in different ways. Within the spirit of the realist approach to the evaluation the three subgroup holistic narratives provide an insight into what works for whom in what circumstances and why.

Telephone befriending: a valuable service during lockdown

HEALTHWATCH ENFIELD
2020

This report gives a brief overview of the telephone befriending scheme set up in the London Borough of Enfield during the Coronavirus pandemic and a snapshot of issues raised by residents identified as being vulnerable or at risk. Overall, Healthwatch Enfield volunteers made 413 telephone befriending calls during this period. The main issue raised by participants was the impact of social isolation on health and wellbeing including mental health issues, with those residents with ongoing health needs being particularly concerned. Recipients appreciated food parcels and medicines delivery but also valued the support of family and neighbours. Most of the recipients were pleased to receive the calls and a core continued to receive these throughout the period. The report suggests that the scheme should be continued if people request it, with established organisations being asked to support the calls. If or when a second wave arises, arrangements should be made to re-establish the full service.

Results 41 - 50 of 744

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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