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All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 51 - 60 of 543

Health at home: a new health and wellbeing model for social housing tenants

PEABODY
2018

Explores how housing support services and community-based health services can deliver effective services at lower cost; encourage self-care for the most vulnerable customers and reduce dependency on direct support; work with other agencies to ensure a coordinated response to the residents’ complex and multiple health needs. The report sets out the findings of a study which aimed to test a person-centred support model using a randomised control trial of 261 general needs residents aged over 50. The service model employed health navigators and volunteers to coach and connect residents with the relevant health, housing and community services they need. The study used to measurement tools to assess impact: the Patient Activation Measure (PAM) and Coaching for Activation (CFA). The study found that three months of intervention with those who started in PAM Level 2 was sufficient to move them up, on average, an entire PAM level. This increase in activation was sustained for at least nine months after the intervention ended, suggesting that participants gained the skills and confidence to effectively manage their health without further support after the initial intensive intervention. This is significant as one of the largest studies into cost reductions from PAM level changes in the United States found that patients who moved from Level 2 to Level 3 reduced their annual healthcare costs by 12%. Existing evidence also indicates that when people become more active in self-care, they benefit from better health outcomes, and fewer unplanned health admissions. The report concludes that there is a clear and compelling case for continuing to support integrated care and strengthen links between the health and housing agendas.

Arts on prescription for community‐dwelling older people with a range of health and wellness needs

POULOS Roslyn G., et al
2019

Published evidence for the role of participatory art in supporting health and well‐being is growing. The Arts on Prescription model is one vehicle by which participatory art can be delivered. Much of the focus of Arts on Prescription has been on the provision of creative activities for people with mental health needs. This Arts on Prescription program, however, targeted community‐dwelling older people with a wide range of health and wellness needs. Older people were referred to the program by their healthcare practitioner. Professional artists led courses in visual arts, photography, dance and movement, drama, singing, or music. Classes were held weekly for 8–10 weeks, with six to eight participants per class, and culminated with a showing of work or a performance. Program evaluation involved pre‐ and postcourse questionnaires, and focus groups and individual interviews. Evaluation data on 127 participants aged 65 years and older were available for analysis. This study found that Arts on Prescription had a positive impact on participants. Quantitative findings revealed a statistically significant improvement in the Warwick–Edinburgh Mental Well‐being Scale (WEMWBS) as well as a statistically significant increase in the level of self‐reported creativity and frequency of creative activities. Qualitative findings indicated that the program provided challenging artistic activities which created a sense of purpose and direction, enabled personal growth and achievement, and empowered participants, in a setting which fostered the development of meaningful relationships with others. This evaluation adds to the evidence base in support of Arts on Prescription by expanding the application of the model to older people with a diverse range of health and wellness needs.

Age UK Rotherham hospital aftercare service: evaluation of the pilot extension into UECC and AMU at TRFT

DAYSON Chris, BASHIR Nadia, LEATHER David
2018

An independent evaluation of the pilot extension of the Age UK Rotherham (AUKR) Hospital Aftercare Service (HAS, into the Emergency Department and Assessment Medical Unit of The Rotherham Foundation Trust Hospital. The pilot, funded by the Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), ran from 1st October 2017 to 30th September 2018. The evaluation looks at outcomes, focussing on the impact of the service on avoidable hospital admissions, patient experience and independence. It reports that the pilot service provided support to 239 older people who would otherwise have been admitted, offering transport to return home where safe to do so, help and support to settle back in at home and support to access other forms of community based support to enable them to continue to live independently. The findings of the evaluation were overwhelmingly positive. Outcomes achieved include: the prevention of 20 in-patient admissions resulting in the avoidance of £32,180 (estimated) in NHS costs; the provision of additional support in their home to 55 HAS patients and access additional benefits entitlements with a total value of £22,243.55; and reduced waiting times for patient prior to discharge and an improved flow through UECC. Both patients and staff were very positive about the service. The evaluation estimates that overall the pilot led to total benefits (to health services and to patients) of £65,704, a return on investment of 73 pence (£0.73) for each pound (£) invested by the CCG.

Raising the bar on strength and balance: the importance of community-based provision

CENTRE FOR AGEING BETTER
2019

This report draws on work from the University of Manchester Healthy Ageing Research Group, which worked with communities to better understand the challenges of delivering strength and balance programmes for older adults in the local community. These activities could include resistance training, aerobics classes and yoga groups. The report argues that NHS falls rehabilitation services often don’t have the funding or ability to provide sufficient strength and balance programmes to meet existing needs, which means an effective community-based response is essential. The report presents different models of delivery of community-based activities, barriers to delivery and examples of innovative solutions identified during the project. The findings cover five themes: raising awareness, encouraging uptake, exercise referral pathways that work, sticking to the evidence, and monitoring for outcomes and improvements. Each theme highlights five key points to ensure that strength and balance exercise programmes are delivered to the right people, at the right time, and by the right people, so that older adults achieve positive results. Recommendations for commissioners, providers and health care professionals are also included. These include for NHS and local authorities support evidence-based programmes and for improved collaboration between those referring people to programmes and those delivering them.

The impact of attending day care designed for home-dwelling people with dementia on nursing home admission: a 24-month controlled study

ROKSTAD Anne Marie Mork, et al
2018

Background: Day care services offer meaningful activities, a safe environment for attendees and respite for family caregivers while being expected to delay the need for nursing home (NH) admission. However, previous research has shown inconsistent results regarding postponement of NH admission. The objective of the study was to explore the influence of a day care programme designed for home-dwelling people with dementia on NH admission. Method: A quasi-experimental trial explored the proportion of patients permanently admitted to nursing homes after 24 months as the main outcome by comparing a group of day care attendees (DG) and a group of participants without day care (CG). In all, 257 participants were included (181 in DG and 76 in CG). A logistic regression model was developed with NH admission as the outcome. Participant group (DG or CG) was the main predictor, baseline patient and family caregiver characteristics and interactions were used as covariates. Results: The mean age of participants was 81.5 (SD 6.4), 65% were women and 53% lived alone. The mean MMSE score was 20.4 (SD 3.5). In all, 128 (50%) of the participants were admitted to a nursing home by the 24-month follow-up, 63 participants (25%) completed the follow-up assessment and 66 (26%) dropped out due to death (8%) and other reasons (18%). In the logistic unadjusted regression model for NH admission after 24 months, participant group (DG or CG) was not found to be a significant predictor of NH admission. The results from the adjusted model revealed that the participant group was associated with NH admission through the interactions with age, living conditions, affective symptoms, sleep symptoms and practical functioning, showing a higher probability for NH admission in DG compared to CG. Conclusion: The study reveals no evidence to confirm that day care services designed for people with dementia postpone the need for NH admission. Admission to nursing homes seems to be based on a complex mix of personal and functional characteristics both in the person with dementia and the family caregivers. The findings should be considered in accordance with the limitation of inadequate power and the high drop-out rate.

Precious memories: a randomized controlled trial on the effects of an autobiographical memory intervention delivered by trained volunteers in residential care homes

WESTERHO Gerben J., et al
2018

Objectives: This study assesses the effects of an autobiographical memory intervention on the prevention and reduction of depressive symptoms in older persons in residential care. Trained volunteers delivered the intervention. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was carried out with depressive symptoms as the primary outcome. The experimental condition received the intervention Precious Memories one-on-one, whereas the control condition had individual unstructured contacts with a volunteer. Participants were 86 older persons living in residential care. There were three measurements: pre-intervention, post-intervention (2 months after the first measurement), and follow-up (8 months after the first measurement). Besides depressive symptoms, the retrieval of specific positive memories was measured as a process variable. Anxiety, loneliness, well-being, and mastery were assessed as secondary outcomes. Results: Depressive symptoms improved equally in the intervention and the control condition at post-measurement. Participants with clinically relevant depressive symptoms also maintained the effects at follow-up in both conditions. The retrieval of specific positive memories improved more in the autobiographical memory intervention, although this was not maintained at follow-up. Anxiety and loneliness improved equally well in both conditions, but no effects were found for well-being or mastery. Conclusion: It is concluded that volunteers can deliver the intervention and contribute to the mental health of this highly vulnerable group of older adults.

The key priorities to prevent and tackle loneliness and social isolation in Wales

WELSH NHS CONFEDERATION
2019

A briefing paper which outlines 20 key areas for the Welsh Government to consider during the consultation to build community resilience and support communities to combat loneliness and social isolation. The priority areas include responding into individual needs and developing a personalised response; supporting lonely individuals to access services, and providing differing levels of support - preventative, responsive and restorative support to help people re-engage with their communities. The priorities are endorsed by a wide group of health and care organisations.

Age Friendly Island: local evaluation. Annual evaluation report 17/18

NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
2018

Age Friendly Island (AFI) is one of 14 partnership programmes funded through Big Lottery Fulfilling Lives: Ageing Better Programme, to pilot new or joined up ways of working to reduce social isolation in older people. This report presents the findings of an evaluation undertaken in the Isle of Wight in 2017-18, the third year of the Programme. The Programme consists of 12 projects, including Community and Care Navigators, Alzheimers Cafe, Care for Carers, Men in Sheds and Mental Health Peer Support. It finds that the Programme has continued to make progress made towards achieving the four main Programme outcomes. It reports that the Programme has continued to opportunities for older people to increase their social connections and has led to decreased social isolation for people involved across the projects; older people are increasingly co-producing and shaping their own individual support and the services; and significant progress towards the Isle of Wight becoming an Age friendly Island, with an increase in inter-generational activities. Although quantitative health and well-being measures have demonstrated either no progress or minimal changes to levels of health and wellbeing, interviews with participants have shown that participation in the Programme has had a positive impact on the physical and mental health, wellbeing and /or quality of life of those involved. The report includes recommendations for the Ageing Better Programme team and for the projects in the Programme.

Social prescribing and community-based support: summary guide

NHS ENGLAND
2019

A guide provides best practice advice for people and organisations leading local implementation of social prescribing. It describes what good social prescribing looks like and how it can improve outcomes for people, their families and carers, as well as achieving more value from the system. It considers what needs to be in place locally to implement social prescribing, commission local social prescribing connector schemes and enable agencies refer people with wider social needs to community-based support. It will enable collaborative working amongst local partners at a ‘place-based’ local level, to recognise the value of community groups and assets and to enable people to build or rebuild friendships, community connections and a sense of belonging, as well as accessing existing services. Includes a draft job description and person specification for a Social prescribing link worker.

Health and Wellbeing Innovation Commission Inquiry: social connections and loneliness

BEACH Brian
2018

This report reflects on how innovation can help foster and improve social connections to the benefit for all people in an ageing society. It also sets out examples of effective innovation in the area of social connections, opportunities and barriers to further innovation, and recommendations to support innovation. The report is based on an oral evidence session where expert witnesses gave evidence to the commissioners and research from ILC-UK. It is one of four publications from ILC-UK’s Health and Wellbeing Innovation Commission Inquiry, which examined the potential for innovation in the areas of health and wellbeing to ensure that services remain sustainable, address needs efficiently, and contribute to positive experiences in later life.

Results 51 - 60 of 543

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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