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All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 71 - 80 of 446

Evaluation of Hale Community Connectors Social Prescribing Service 2017

DAYSON Chris, LEATHER David
2018

Reports on initial findings of an independent evaluation of the Community Connectors Social Prescribing Service in Bradford, covering the first nine months of the service (March-November 2017). It aims to answer some key questions about the Community Connectors Social Prescribing Service to support future commissioning by the CCG and its partners. The service was commissioned to improve the health, well-being and social connectedness of local people and reduce unplanned and unnecessary demand on primary and secondary health services. The service involves a referral from a GP of patients who could benefit from additional socially focussed support, followed by a home visit from a Community Connector to help identify what services and activities are available. The evaluation shows that a total of 703 local people were referred to the service for support by their GP. The majority of referrals were to address social issues such as anxiety and social isolation, however, a significant proportion of service users were also in poor health with long term conditions. It also identifies positive outcomes in relation to health, mental well-being, trust of people in their community, social connectedness and service users’ ability to self-care. Although too early to assess the impact on demand for primary and secondary care, service users recording up to nine per cent fewer Accident and Emergency and up to seven per cent fewer GP attendances after referral to the service.

Evaluation of a web-based app to assist home-hazard modification in falls prevention

WARD Gillian, WALKER-CLARKE Aimee, HOLLIDAY Nikki
2017

Introduction: Given the impact falls can have on older people and their families, many health and social care services are focused on preventing falls and implementing interventions to reduce future falls. FallCheck is a web app that supports identification of home-hazards and directs users towards self-management strategies to reduce risk of falling. Method: A survey by clinical experts of a beta version of FallCheck was conducted, producing quantitative and qualitative data including issues and attributes identified by respondents. Thirty-six individuals signed up to take part in the study, and 27 respondents took part in the final evaluation survey. Findings: Testing by health and social care professionals found there is scope for using the app as a digital self-assessment tool by people at risk of falls. It has further potential as an effective tool to support environmental/behavioural change to reduce risk of falls. Conclusion: FallCheck was developed from a sound evidence-base to support home-hazard modification as an effective intervention component within a multifactorial intervention to prevent falls. Health and social care professionals found it had good acceptability for use in practice, justifying further testing of the usability and effectiveness of the app in supporting behavioural changes and environmental modifications with people at risk of falling and carers.

Pulling together

WORF Candy, GOODMAN Jolie, PLIMPTON Ben
2018

This practice handbook draws on the work of the Mental Health Foundation's Standing Together project, which facilitated 19 peer-support groups for older people living in extra care housing. The aim of the groups was to improve the emotional and social wellbeing of participants, and reduce loneliness and social isolation. The handbook pulls together learning from the project and provides inspiration to anyone wanting to set up a peer-support group with older people – whether they are tenants in housing schemes, staff or volunteers. It includes information on group activities used by the facilitators, including digital photography activities, memory boxes, collages and art sessions, and flower arranging workshops. It also provides advice on managing conflict between group members, information on how to support a community when a member dies, information for facilitators, and highlights the importance of listening to group members.

An evaluation of the Standing Together project

MENTAL HEALTH FOUNDATION
2018

An evaluation of the Standing Together project, which examines the impact of peer-support groups on the emotional and social wellbeing of people living in extra care housing. Specifically, it looks at whether participation in the Standing Together programme had an effect on the outcomes of loneliness and social isolation; emotional wellbeing; and meaningful activity and community engagement. The groups ran once a week for six months in 19 extra care housing schemes within Housing & Care 21 and Notting Hill Housing Trust. Each group was led by two trained facilitators. Facilitators sought to include all residents from the extra care housing group including individuals with mental health difficulties, dementia, learning disability and/or significant loneliness. Focus group findings, which consisted of 45 residents at baseline and 57 at follow-up, demonstrated that most residents felt that participating in the groups led to positive impacts in all the outcome areas. Residents also expressed a desire for the groups to continue. Staff involved in the programme also felt that the groups led to reduced feelings of isolation and loneliness, increased companionship, mental stimulation and social inclusion. The process evaluation also emphasised the value in having two skilled tactful facilitators in each group who are able to effectively manage a group of residents, some of whom may have dementia or cognitive impairments. The report includes recommendations for conducting evaluations of group work in later life.

Housing adaptations

AUDITOR GENERAL FOR WALES
2018

This report assesses whether organisations with responsibilities for delivering housing adaptations in Wales - which include local authorities, housing associations and Care and Repair agencies - have an effective approach that delivers value for money. It finds that the current system needs to change in order to meet the needs of older and disabled people. The review involved fieldwork at five local authorities and four housing associations, a survey of people who had received adaptations; and an analysis of data and expenditure on current services. It reports that although users express high levels of satisfaction with housing adaptations, the system is complex, reactive and results in people with similar needs often receiving different standards of service because of where they live and who is providing the service. Although public bodies are aware of the benefits of adaptations in supporting independence, ineffective partnership working results in missed opportunities to address needs and avoid and reduce demand and costs in health and social care services. The report makes nine recommendations for improvement, including: for the Welsh Government to set a minimum standard for adaptation work, so people can receive the same standard wherever they live; for local authorities to work more closely with partner agencies who deliver adaptations and streamline the application and delivery processes; and the provision of more accessible versions of information to the public.

Chief Social Worker for Adults annual report 2017-18. From strength to strength: strengths-based practice and achieving better lives

GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health and Social Care
2018

This report sets out progress in improving the education, training and practice of social work with adults in England during 2016-17 and outlines priorities to further raise the quality and profile of adult social work in 2018-19. Themed around strengths-based social work practice, the report offers examples of social workers using asset and strengths-based practice approaches. It also reviews how adult social work is reshaping the culture of adult social care and the way organisations collaborate across health, community and voluntary sectors to maintain people’s quality of life and independence. It highlights a number of practice developments in the sector, covering strengths-based approaches, initiatives working to develop the social care workforce, integrated care, and work by hospital social work teams to reduce delayed transfers of care from hospital. Key priorities identified by the Chief Social Work for Adults for 2018-19 include promoting the value of social work practice with adults in personalising high quality health and social care integrated outcomes for people and their carers; to raise the quality of practice; and to improve productivity through social work practice that works in partnership with people to co-produce support.

Adding extra years to life and extra life to those years: local government guide to healthy ageing

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2018

Guide that sets out priority areas for partnership working to improve later life health. The guide focuses on taking a life course approach and developing healthy behaviours and includes practice examples. The eight case studies in the guide provide examples about what can work to reduce the impact of long-term conditions. The case examples cover tackling loneliness and isolation; preventing falls; getting older people active; using lottery funding to boost healthy ageing; an Olympic legacy for older people; extending the NHS Health Checks programme; getting people talking about their health and reshaping the strategy on health ageing.

Asset based approaches and inequalities: briefing

AMBITION FOR AGEING
2018

Asset-based approaches can make significant and positive changes to people’s lives. However, if implemented without an understanding of marginalisation, asset-based approaches risk contributing to existing inequalities, excluding those who are the most socially isolated. Using learning from the Ambition for Ageing programme, this briefing highlights the need for recognition of the barriers faced by marginalised groups as a key part of asset-based work. It puts forward a number of solutions, such as supporting marginalised groups to be involved in genuine co-production and asset mapping, using targeted approaches to identify marginalised and social isolated groups, and well-planned processes for enhancing community capacity. It also includes case studies and key findings from the Ambition for Ageing programme in Greater Manchester.

Health matters: community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2018

This resource focuses on the concept and practice of community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing and outlines how to create the conditions for community assets to thrive. It looks at the benefits of working with communities, in terms of improved outcomes and potential savings. It also outlines the range of community-centred approaches that can be used to improve community health and wellbeing. These include initiatives to strengthen communities; volunteering and peer support; collaborations and partnerships; and access to community resources. It highlights evidence, key policy documents and includes links to resources and case studies.

A structured literature review to identify cost-effective interventions to prevent falls in older people living in the community

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2018

Summarises the findings from a literature review to identify cost-effective interventions in preventing falls in older people living in the community in England. The review was conducted to inform an economic model to estimate the return on investment of the cost effective interventions across communities in England. The review identified 26 studies, of which 12 were judged to be directly applicable. These included 6 types of interventions: exercise, home assessment and modifications, multifactorial programmes; medicines review and modification to drugs; cardiac pacing and expedited cataract surgery. Based on the evidence, the review recommends interventions to be included in the economic model.

Results 71 - 80 of 446

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