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Results for 'advice services'

Results 11 - 20 of 21

Social value of local area coordination in Derby: a forecast social return on investment analysis for Derby City Council

MARSH Hannah
2016

Presents the findings of a forecast analysis of the social value of local area coordination in Derby. The aim of local area coordination is to support residents in the local community to ‘get a life, not a service’, empowering individuals to find community based solutions instead of relying on services. The analysis demonstrates that over the three year forecast period with 10 local area coordinators, local area coordination would deliver significant social value with up to £4 of value for every £1 invested. Further expansion of the service to 17 local area coordinators across all wards would see this value increase further with an increased number of individuals receiving the support. The report highlights that local area coordination is delivering significant benefit to individuals in the community by increasing their overall health and wellbeing. In addition, other stakeholders and the wider community also benefit from local area coordination with community groups forming to address need and benefiting from the promotion through coordinators. The report sets out key recommendations to further optimise the social value created through this service and to better capture the impact and inform future evaluations.

More than medicine: new services for people powered health

LANGFORD Katharine, BAECK Peter, HAMPSON Martha
2013

Examines the constitutive elements of the ‘more than medicine’ approach, looking at social prescribing, signposting through link workers, health trainers and navigators, and community-based services. ‘More than medicine’ creates a set of tools for clinicians to use with patients to address the behavioural and social aspects of long term conditions. It connects the clinical consultation with interventions such as peer support groups, debt counselling, walking groups, befriending, one-to-one coaching and community cooking classes that help people to manage their long-term conditions and improve their health and wellbeing. These activities, places and people help service users and patients to live healthier lives, make friends and learn new skills. The report provides a description of each element of ‘more than medicine’ - social prescribing, signposting and community services - and illustrates the discussion with case studies and summaries of the evidence.

Community navigation in Brighton and Hove: evaluation of a social prescribing pilot

FARENDEN Clair, et al
2015

An evaluation of the community navigation service, a one-year social prescribing pilot. The model for the pilot was based on Age UK national templates, drawing from their vast knowledge and experience of delivering other similar services across the UK. Community navigators work in GP surgeries to assess patients non-medical support needs and help them access groups, services and activities that can broadly improve their health and wellbeing. The evaluation found that navigation is effective for patients, GP surgeries and volunteers. Patients feel listened to and understood by navigators, have increased access to the right services at the right time and are able to take the next steps towards improving their health and wellbeing. GPs continue to increase referrals, are satisfied with the quality of the service and are seeing positive benefits for their patients. Navigators value their volunteering role and suggest the training and support provided by the staff team enables them to carry it out effectively. 393 patients were referred across 16 surgeries during the first 12 months of the pilot and 741 referrals were made to groups, services and activities patients would not have otherwise accessed. The service attracted a highly experienced and skilled volunteer team to carry out the community navigator role. Most navigators have a previous or current career in healthcare, social services, teaching or counselling. The evaluation examines in detail: the impact on primary and secondary care; community navigation activities, outputs and outcomes; the social value; cost-benefit analysis; lessons, challenges and successes; and risk and opportunities. A set of key recommendations derived from the learning from the pilot are included.

Social prescribing: a review of the evidence

KINSELLA Sarah
2016

A brief review of the literature on social prescribing. Social prescribing is a way of linking primary care patients with psycho-social issues, with sources of appropriate, non-medical support in the community. Suitable referrals to social prescribing initiatives are vulnerable and at risk groups such as: people with mild to moderate depression and anxiety; low income single parents; recently bereaved older people; people with long term conditions and frequent attendees in primary and secondary care. The review highlights that prescribed activities have typically included arts and creative activities, physical activity, learning and volunteering opportunities and courses, self-care and support with practical issues such as benefits, housing, debt and employment. The evidence on the impact of social prescribing is currently limited and inconsistent. While some initiatives have shown improved outcomes for patients and potential for cost-savings (in the longer term), few have been subject to economic analysis or the kind of rigorous evaluation which would inform commissioners. The report recommends that any new, local social prescribing initiatives should aim to add to the current evidence base and conduct transparent and thorough.

Supporting the independence of older people: are councils doing enough?

THOMAS Huw Vaughan
2015

This report examines how effective councils in Wales have been in providing strategic leadership on older person’s issues. It analyses the Welsh Government’s and councils’ budgets, looking at the range and availability of preventative services across Wales, focusing on four core aspects that support older people to continue to live independently: practical support services; community based facilities; advice and information services; and housing and housing based services. The report also assesses councils’ performance management arrangements for overseeing services to older people, examining the information that is used by councils to judge performance. The review argues that Councils’ strategies and leadership focus too much on delivery of social services and do not always recognise the important contribution that other services can make in supporting and sustaining the independence of older people. Despite some innovative examples of councils supporting older people, the wider preventative services that can help reduce demand for health and social services are undervalued. A lack of data is making it difficult for councils to demonstrate the impact of their services in supporting the independence of older people, and this weakens their decision making and scrutiny when setting future priorities.

Evaluation of Redcar and Cleveland Community Agents Project: outputs and outcomes summary report

WATSON Pat, SHUCKSMITH Janet
2015

The Community Agents Project, a programme jointly funded through health and adult social care services, is an innovative approach to meeting the social needs of the elderly and vulnerable population. Community agents act as a one-stop shop, signposting people to the appropriate service that meets their needs. This could be an organisation or voluntary group that can help with shopping, arrange transport to the GP surgery or hospital appointments, help to complete forms, offer encouragement to maintain a care plan, organise a befriender, accompany to a local social activity or signposting to other agencies. The project has received a total of 486 referrals across the borough of Redcar & Cleveland for the period September 2014-September 2015, generating positive outcomes in the following areas: maintaining independence; faster discharge from hospital; reducing admissions to hospital; reducing isolation; improved financial status; appropriate use of health and social services; cost saving; and increases in community capacity. The report estimates a social return on investment of £3.29 for every £1 invested in the Community Agents Project.

The Care Act 2014 and its statutory guidance: briefing for the housing support sector

FOUNDATIONS
2015

This briefing summarises the implications of the Care Act and its statutory guidance for commissioners and providers of Home Improvement Agency services in England in relation to housing and adaptations. It looks particularly at the role of housing related services to help in preventing or delaying demand for larger packages of care and support and help in integrating the whole system. Sections cover: prevention; advice and information; integration; assessments and eligibility criteria.

Village and Community Agents- Gloucestershire Rural Community Council

Gloucestershire County Council

Village and Community Agents are trusted members of Gloucestershire rural communities who provide face-to-face information, signposting and support to local disadvantaged and isolated people, including older people (aged 50 and over) and adults aged over 18 affected by cancer, enabling them to make informed decisions about their own wellbeing. There is an emphasis upon providing community-based solutions and on promoting independence among its older clients.

Thurrock Local Area Co-ordination

Thurrock Council

Local Area Coordination helps vulnerable people in Thurrock find support in their local communities. It forms part of Thurrock's Building Positive Futures programme, which aims to support older and vulnerable people to live well; to increase their health and wellbeing; improve housing and neighbourhoods and create stronger, more hospitable and age-friendly communities. LAC was selected as an approach because more than 20 years of evaluation of its use in Western Australia has shown it to lead to positive outcomes for individuals, build community resilience and reduce demand for formal services.

'When I get off the phone I feel like I belong to the human race': evaluation of the Silver Line Helpline pilots

CENTRE FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE
2013

An evaluation of the Silver Line helpline and befriending service which was set up in response to loneliness and isolation of older people in the UK. The service has been piloted in the North West of the UK, and in the Isle of Man since the end of November 2012 and provides a helpline offering information, referrals to other organisations and someone to talk to 24 hours a day. The evaluation included a literature review, interviews by phone and in person, and fieldwork in the three call centres. The results found that the service was fulfilling its three key objectives of providing a referral service, delivering a befriending service to combat loneliness, and to help identify those who are vulnerable and may be suffering abuse or neglect. The evalution also highlights the skills and values that staff and volunteers considered to be essential when operating the service. Key recommendations for the future included extending the pilot across the country through partnership.

Results 11 - 20 of 21

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
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