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Results for 'asset based approach'

Results 11 - 20 of 24

Age-friendly and inclusive volunteering: review of community contributions in later life

JOPLING Kate, JONES Dan
2018

This review considers how to enable more people to contribute to their communities, in later life (defined as aged 50 and over), with a focus on increasing participation among underrepresented groups, especially those in poor health or living with long-term health conditions. It covers activities such as neighbourliness, helping in the community and volunteering. It draws on a range of sources including a call for evidence, a call for practice and seven roundtable meetings involving over 100 participants. The report looks at why people get involved with their communities and how contributing to communities can improve social connections, and lead to increased life satisfaction and wellbeing; how volunteering can change across the life course; and the practical, structural and emotional barriers to contributing to communities. It sets out a framework for age-friendly, inclusive volunteering, which includes for volunteering to: be flexible and to fit around life changes; to provide support and training needed; to provide opportunities to be sociable and feel connected; value volunteers; provide meaningful activity; and make good use of strengths and experiences. The review makes recommendations for the voluntary, public and private sectors on how to tackle the barriers to enable people to continue to volunteer throughout their lifetime. Case studies of good practice are included throughout the report.

Connecting communities to tackle loneliness and social isolation: learning report

JOPLING Kate, HOWELLS Anna
2018

Summarises findings from a learning programme, looking at how connector services across the UK help reconnect people who are experiencing loneliness back to their communities. The learning events enabled detailed conversations between service providers, and provided an opportunity to share and reflect on challenges facing services. Four common challenges emerged: reaching those most in need; connecting people; knowing what interventions are out there; and measuring outcomes. While there is no easy solution to any of these, the report outlines possible approaches for overcoming these barriers, including: linking with health professionals can be helpful in reaching the most isolated people; go to everyday places such as supermarkets, libraries, pubs, taxi services; adopting an asset-based approach to working with individuals; using local knowledge and connections to find the right support for people in all their diversity; and ensuring frontline staff have access to training and support to use measurement tools effectively.

Health 2020 priority area four: creating supportive environments and resilient communities: a compendium of inspirational examples


2018

Brings together innovative examples of actions taken in 13 countries to strengthen resilience and build supportive environments for population health and well-being. The examples show how building resilience can be achieved by developing and sustaining partnerships between institutions and communities; by community action and bottom-up efforts; at system level, both nationally and locally. The examples, primarily gathered from community initiatives, are linked to the four types of resilience capacities: adaptive, absorptive, anticipatory and transformative. Topics covered include the role of resilience building in addressing human rights, health inequities, environmental hazards, and health-related topics such as communicable and noncommunicable diseases. Examples from the UK include: Promoting social connections and community networks for older people through Better in Sheffield; Supporting local systems to tackle the social determinants of health inequalities; Strengthening resilience through the early intervention and prevention: breaking the generational cycle of crime project; and A social movement for health and resilience in Blackburn with Darwen. Each example attempts to describe: the action undertaken; the resilience-related issue that the action aimed to address; and the impact and lessons learnt in the process of strengthening resilience.

Asset based approaches and inequalities: briefing

AMBITION FOR AGEING
2018

Asset-based approaches can make significant and positive changes to people’s lives. However, if implemented without an understanding of marginalisation, asset-based approaches risk contributing to existing inequalities, excluding those who are the most socially isolated. Using learning from the Ambition for Ageing programme, this briefing highlights the need for recognition of the barriers faced by marginalised groups as a key part of asset-based work. It puts forward a number of solutions, such as supporting marginalised groups to be involved in genuine co-production and asset mapping, using targeted approaches to identify marginalised and social isolated groups, and well-planned processes for enhancing community capacity. It also includes case studies and key findings from the Ambition for Ageing programme in Greater Manchester.

Health matters: community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2018

This resource focuses on the concept and practice of community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing and outlines how to create the conditions for community assets to thrive. It looks at the benefits of working with communities, in terms of improved outcomes and potential savings. It also outlines the range of community-centred approaches that can be used to improve community health and wellbeing. These include initiatives to strengthen communities; volunteering and peer support; collaborations and partnerships; and access to community resources. It highlights evidence, key policy documents and includes links to resources and case studies.

Learning from the vanguards: supporting people and communities to stay well

NHS CONFEDERATION, et al
2018

This briefing explores how the care vanguard sites have sought to design health and care services around the needs of people who use them, focusing on the outcomes that matter to people and tailoring care to their needs and goals. It also explores how the vanguards have adopted community- and asset-based approaches to consider the broadest possible influencers on health and care. This new approach recognises that services should be designed to support people to be more involved in their own care, challenges the traditional divide between patients and professionals, and offers opportunities for better health through increased prevention and supported self-care. The briefing includes examples of practice from the vanguard sites. The briefing is part of a series developed by the NHS Confederation, NHS Clinical Commissioners, NHS Providers and Local Government Association.

Commissioning community development for health: a concise handbook

CHANAN Gabriel, FISHER Brian
2018

A practical guide to help Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), sustainability and transformation partnerships (STPs) and local authorities to commission community development to support health and wellbeing. The guide looks at the role of community development in health and health policy, explains the main features of community development and the role community-based approaches can play in improving services. It includes a seven step framework for building community-led partnerships with local agencies and suggests key performance indicators that can be used to evaluate progress. It also provides a model contract for provision of the community development project and identifies the skill set for community development leaders and staff. The handbook is tailored to current policy in England, but the key principles have wider relevance.

Promoting asset based approaches for health and wellbeing: exploring a theory of change and challenges in evaluation

RIPPON Simon, SOUTH Jane
2017

This project explores two key areas that are critical for moving to a more systematised approach to asset based action for health. It builds on the report ‘Head, hand and heart’, from the Health Foundation, to explore further the develop a Theory of Change for asset based approaches aligned to an asset model for health and also looks at ways of evaluating and measuring the benefits and impact of asset based approaches. Drawing on the findings from site visits, interviews and a think piece event, this report presents a new Theory of Change for asset-based working. A rapid review of published and grey literature was also conducted to map and categorise evaluate approaches and measures used in asset-based programmes. The map of literature showed that a variety of methodologies and evaluation strategies are used in asset-based practice. The report summarises the approaches across the seven broad clusters of: Asset Based Community Development; Asset Mapping; Community-based evaluation; Conceptual frameworks for measurement; Resilience; Salutogenesis; and Other. The report suggests that a high level Theory of Change that incorporates an orientation phase provides an opportunity to set out the purpose and rationale of asset based activity. This can also enable measurement and evaluation to be better defined and managed, and help local actors in articulating the benefits (or not) of asset based approaches for health.

What works in community led support? Findings and lessons from local approaches and solutions for transforming adult social care (and health) services...

BROWN Helen, et al
2017

The first evaluation report of the Community Led Support (CLS) programme, which supported nine authorities across England, Wales and Scotland to develop and implement a new model of delivering community based care and support. The findings show what can be achieved when applying core principles associated with asset based approaches. CLS involves local authorities working collaboratively with their communities, partner organisations and staff to design a health and social care service that works for everyone. Its core principles include co-production; a focus on communities; preventing crises by enabling people to get support and advice when they need it; a culture based on trust and empowerment; and treating people as equals, and building on their strengths. The evaluation found evidence that CLS resulted in better experiences and outcomes for local people, improved access to services; greater efficiencies in services; reduced waiting times and lists; increased signposting and resolution through community services; improvement in staff morale; and a potential for cost savings. Sites achieved these changes by adopting a variety of approaches to implementing CLS - from implementing CLS across an entire authority area at the same time, to implementing in one innovation site and encouraging others to adopt aspects of the service. The report identifies six priority areas for action to further develop and embed community led support over the next 12-18 months.

Building bridges to a good life: a review of asset based, person centred approaches and people with learning disabilities in Scotland

McNEISH Di, SCOTT Sarah, WILLIAMS Jennie
2016

This review explores the potential to join up thinking on increased choice and control for people with learning disabilities and the principles of asset based working. Commissioned by the Scottish Commission for Learning Disability, it considers the efficacy of asset based approaches for people with learning disabilities, looks at evidence of the impact these approaches can have on people’s lives and also identifies examples of good practice in Scotland. The review draws on the results of a literature review; interviews with key informants involved in asset based working and learning disability services; and a mapping of projects using asset based principles with people with learning disabilities across Scotland. The results suggest that there are is reason why the focus of assets work cannot be broadened to include opportunities for people with learning disabilities. However it suggests that asset based approaches should be seen in the context of efforts to advance the personalisation and social integration agendas, and that if that they need to fit alongside services, support systems and initiatives. Examples included in the review illustrate how services can add to the assets of individuals and communities, provided they are willing and committed to relating to people and doing things differently. Factors identified that facilitate asset based approaches with people with learning disabilities, include: addressing wider inequalities and stigma; ensuring people with learning disabilities are active participants in place based community development; and tackling attitudinal barriers and established ways of doing things.

Results 11 - 20 of 24

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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