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Results for 'care homes'

Results 21 - 30 of 33

Effectiveness of complex falls prevention interventions in residential aged care settings: a systematic review

FRANCIS-COAD Jacqueline, et al
2018

Objective: The objective of this review was to synthesize the best available evidence for the effectiveness of complex falls prevention interventions delivered at two or more of the following levels: resident, facility or organization, on fall rates in the residential aged care (RAC) population. Introduction: Preventing falls in the high risk RAC population is a common global goal with acknowledged complexity. Previous meta-analyses have not specifically addressed complexity, described as falls prevention intervention delivery at multiple levels of a RAC organization, to determine its effect on fall outcomes. Inclusion criteria: The current review considered studies that included participants who were aged 65 years and over residing in long-term care settings providing 24-hour supervision and/or care assistance. Studies that evaluated complex falls prevention interventions delivered by single discipline or multidisciplinary teams across at least two or all of the following levels: residents, RAC facility and RAC organization were eligible. Experimental study designs including randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials and quasi-experimental trials that reported on measures related to fall incidence were considered, namely, rate of falls (expressed as the number of falls per 1000 occupied bed days), the number of participants who became fallers (expressed as the number of participants who fell once or more) and the rate of injurious falls (expressed as the number of falls with injury per 1000 occupied bed days). Methods: A three-step search strategy was undertaken, commencing with an initial scoping search of MEDLINE and CINAHL databases prior to an extensive search of all relevant published literature, clinical trial registries and gray literature. Two independent reviewers assessed selected studies for methodological validity using the standardized critical appraisal instrument from the Joanna Briggs Institute System for the Unified Management, Assessment and Review of Information (JBI SUMARI). Data were extracted from the selected studies using the standardized data extraction tool from JBI SUMARI. Quantitative data were pooled in statistical meta-analysis for rate of falls, the number of participants who became fallers and the rate of injurious falls. Meta-analysis was conducted using a random-effect model with heterogeneity assessed using the standard Chi-squared and I2 index. Where statistical pooling was not possible, study findings were presented in narrative form. Results: Twelve studies were included in this review with seven being eligible for meta-analysis. Complex falls prevention interventions delivered at multiple levels in RAC populations did not show a significant effect in reducing fall rates (MD = −1.29; 95% CI [−3.01, 0.43]), or the proportion of residents who fell (OR = 0.76; 95% CI [0.42, 1.38]). However, a sensitivity analysis suggested complex falls prevention interventions delivered with additional resources at multiple levels had a significant positive effect in reducing fall rates (MD = −2.26; 95% CI [−3.72, −0.80]). Conclusions: Complex falls prevention interventions delivered at multiple levels in the RAC population may reduce fall rates when additional staffing, expertise or resources are provided. Organizations may need to determine how resources can be allocated to best address falls prevention management. Future research should continue to investigate which combinations of multifactorial interventions are effective.

Evaluation of the volunteering in care homes project: summary report

HILL Matthew
2016

Summary report of an evaluation of the Volunteering in Care Homes (ViCH) project, which examines the impact of volunteering on residents, staff and volunteers and also explores the implications for developing volunteering in care homes more generally. The project was piloted in fourteen care homes, which placed trained volunteers in befriending and activity-based roles. The evaluation found good subjective evidence from staff and volunteer surveys of that befriending and activity-based volunteering roles have major positive impacts for residents in care homes, especially around social and emotional wellbeing. The majority of staff surveyed also felt the involvement of volunteers has a positive impact on their job, in terms of job satisfaction, retention and levels of stress. The evaluation also looked at the cost-effectiveness of the approach. The project had high start-up costs, with a positive ongoing value ratio achieved 18 months into the project. In order to deliver positive impacts for residents and staff, the project found that volunteers need to be effectively recruited, sufficiently trained, well matched and receive substantial ongoing support and coordination. Other factors identified that need to be addressed to enable volunteer engagement to become well established across the sector, include strategic leadership, culture change, good practice learning, financial resources and regulatory incentives.

Mixing matters: how shared sites can bring older and younger people together and unite Brexit Britain

UNITED FOR ALL AGES
2018

Sets out why increasing connections between generations is key to the health, wellbeing and future of individuals, communities and the country. While Britain has become more age segregated in recent decades, this paper demonstrates there is a growing movement to tackle ‘age apartheid’. The paper focuses on how older and younger people can come together through ‘shared sites’ with many inspiring and practical examples that could be replicated across the UK. Four specific themes are explored: shared care and play; shared housing and living; shared learning and work; and shared community spaces and activities. The paper sets out an ambition to develop 500 shared sites by 2022, arguing that with some 75,000 care homes, nurseries and schools in the UK, there is massive scope for the shared sites challenge to achieve much more.

HenPower

Equal Arts

“I’ve made some great friends through HenPower. What I like about HenPower is that you’re not entertained, you’re involved” (Tommy Appleby, 91, Hensioner, member of HenPower). HenPower was developed by Equal Arts in 2011 as a pilot project, funded by the Big Lottery Silver Dreams Programme with clear outcomes: to both assist and improve the health and wellbeing, and reduce the loneliness of thirty older people, specifically men. These activities were coupled by the project aiming to demonstrate the benefits of keeping hens in care homes alongside taking part in creativity and as ‘Hensioners’, introduce the hen-related activities and arts sessions to the wider community, such as school children. A Hensioner, like Tommy Appleby, fulfils the role of an active HenPower volunteer who can their use existing skills and knowledge to develop an expertise in hen-keeping. When the project was piloted, the eligibility of recruiting each Hensioner was that they had an interest to help others, who are less able then themselves. As champions of HenPower, the project established in care settings through volunteers, artists and project workers meeting with each of the care staff, residents and relatives to introduce creativity and hen-keeping in north-east England.

ExtraCare's Wellbeing Programme

The ExtraCare Charitable Trust

ExtraCare’s Wellbeing Programme was developed in 2002, in partnership with older people who live at ExtraCare’s Schemes and Villages. The concept was launched following a survey, which highlighted that 75% of residents at one location had not accessed any health screening via their GPs or the NHS. A pilot screening scheme subsequently identified 122 previously undetected conditions amongst a population of just 136, highlighting a clear need for the Programme.

Arts in care resource pack

CARE INSPECTORATE
2016

An online resource pack which brings together a collection resources to help promote the importance of arts and creative activities for older residents in care homes. The resource aims to support care staff to plan and run creative arts sessions and help then work with professional artists. It includes a film where three care homes and their residents share their experience of participating in the arts and the difference it has made to living life well. It also includes ‘recipe cards’ for five different arts forms created by artists for care staff. These cards provide ideas and methods to help care staff to run a variety of creative arts sessions within care homes. They cover creative dance, writing poetry, facilitating a singing session, print making and salt dough. The pack also contains guidance on working with professional artists. The pack was developed in partnership with Luminate and a national working group which included representatives from Creative Scotland, the voluntary and independent sectors, Scottish Care, the Scottish Poetry Library, NHS and professional artists.

Quick guide: improving hospital discharge into the care sector

NHS ENGLAND, et al
2015

This quick guide provides ideas and practical tips to commissioners and providers on how to improve hospital discharge for people with care home places or packages of care at home. The guide identifies areas for improvement, setting out checklist actions for local health economies to consider and examples of practical solutions and links to resources. The areas identified are: culture of collaboration between care sector, NHS and social care; improving communication; clarity on information sharing and information governance; difficulties with achieving the ‘home before lunch’ ambition; assessments undertaken in hospital leading to ‘deconditioning’ and longer, unnecessary hospital stays; delays to discharge due to awaiting for assessment; capacity of community-based services; and patient experience and involvement.

Quick guide: technology in care homes

NHS ENGLAND, et al
2015

This quick guide highlights a number of case studies from around the country where technology is being used successfully to enhance the delivery of care to support independent living (telecare), to enhance the health and wellbeing information exchange between patients and professionals (telehealth) and to enhance the information exchange between professionals (telemedicine). It also includes information about secure email and collaboration. Drawing on the case studies, the guide sets out a series of top tips for developing and implementing successful technological initiatives.

Getting serious about prevention: enabling people to stay out of hospital at the end of life

GREY Andrew
2015

This report sets out key steps that commissioners can take in collaboration with service providers to enable people who are approaching the end of life to avoid being admitted to hospital when this is possible and appropriate, as well as enabling those who are admitted to make a transition to a community setting quickly. The report argues that as well as reducing the costs to the NHS, enabling people to stay out of hospital at the end of life can make a significant difference to the experiences of dying people and their families. The report makes a number of recommendations for commissioners, service providers and health and social care staff, including: commissioning the increased provision of 24/7 care in community settings, through care homes and hospices, and community health and social care services that can provide care in people’s homes; commissioning anticipatory prescribing of medicines for people approaching the end of life; using available funding, through System Resilience Groups, the Better Care Fund, and Integrated Personal Commissioning, to improve co-ordination between hospitals and community settings, including hospices, for people approaching the end of life; and health and social care staff identifying carers of people who are approaching the end of life and referring them for local authority assessments.

Sustainability, innovation and empowerment: a five year vision for the independent social care sector

CARE ENGLAND
2015

Sets out Care England’s vision for the next five years on how the organisation and the sector plan to deal with a number of issues facing the health and social care system. The report focuses on critical areas of the current social care landscape, including: integrated and person-centred care; falling fees and local authorities’ budgetary constraints; recruitment of nurses; recruitment, pay and training of the care workforce; raising awareness of the value of the sector; the Care Quality Commission and the need for further improvement of the regulation process; learning disabilities; and dementia. The report warns of the risk of a collapse in the system if providers and commissioners do not work together and more nurses are not recruited into the independent sector.

Results 21 - 30 of 33

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
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