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Results for 'case studies'

Results 11 - 20 of 96

Residents and volunteers: sharing the learning

ABBEYFIELD SOCIETY, AVISON Tracey Berridge, JARVIS Sunnie
2018

This good practice guide shares some of the practical learning from those involved in the Residents as Volunteers project, which supported older people aged over-75 years living in a residential home setting to volunteer. The project was delivered in partnership by Abbeyfield Society and NCVO, and funded by the Big Lottery fund. The guide summarises some of the emotional, social, mental and physical health benefits for residents involved in the project. It then provides advice for getting residents and staff ready to take part in volunteering initiatives; provides ideas to help overcome barriers to volunteering; and ways of identifying volunteering opportunities both inside and outside the home. Case studies from three sites who took part in the Residents as Volunteers project are included: Drake Lodge, Abbeyfield Tavistock Society, Abbeyfield The Dales Society, and Abbeyfield Retirement Living in Nottingham are also included.

Adapting for ageing: good practice and innovation in home adaptations

ADAMS Sue, HODGES Martin
2018

This report identifies examples of high-quality and innovative practice in the provision of home adaptations for older people and looks at key factors which constitute good practice. It draws on the results of a 'call for practice' from Care and Repair England to identify examples from local areas that are organising and delivering adaptations effectively. The report looks at why home adaptations are important and the evidence for them, what good and poor practice looks like, enablers and barriers to innovation and improvement; and what could help drive wider uptake of good practice. The report identifies a number of key features which could ensure an excellent home adaption service. These include: raising awareness of what is possible amongst older people and professionals, including the availability and benefits of home adaptations; helping older people navigate the system to access adaptations advice, funding, practical help and related services; speedy delivery of home adaptations; involving older people in home adaptation service design; including home adaptations in strategic planning; integration of home adaptations with health and care; linking adaptations with home repairs; working with handyperson services; involving social housing providers in adaptation provision; and taking a preventative approach.

TEC stories: how technology enabled care has transformed people's lives

TSA, THINK LOCAL ACT PERSONAL, ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES
2018

This publication presents 10 individual stories which show how technology enabled care is transforming people’s lives. The stories are told from the individual’s perspective, using their experiences and their own unique circumstances to communicate what technology enabled care means to them. It shows how people are using technology from apps to smart sensors to enhance their independence, better manage long-term health conditions and enable a better quality of life. They include examples of how technology can help to tackle loneliness, provide reminders for people living with dementia, help children in local authority care to make their voices heard and help people to keep in touch with their friends. By giving a voice to people who are already using a wide range of technology, this resource offers political leaders, commissioners and practitioners a case for change.

Evaluation of Ageing Better in Birmingham year two report

MORETON Rachel, et al
2018

Evaluation of Ageing Better in Birmingham, part of a wider programme of 14 Ageing Better projects located across England taking an asset-based approach to tackle social isolation and loneliness in older people. The evaluation covers activities completed between May 2017 and April 2018. It reports on the range of activities delivered, which included exercise and arts activities; key characteristics of successful activity; how networks are working to make their activities sustainable; and the ways in which activities are attracting male participants. Short case studies of the groups delivered are included throughout. Key findings show that Ageing Better in Birmingham is successfully engaging ethnically and age diverse participants and older adults who are the most-lonely. This has been achieved by mainly working through established voluntary and community groups, which it is noted may not always effective in those areas where the voluntary and community sector is less well developed. The evaluation found Network Leads play an important role in making a successful Network and that Networks involving physical activity appear to be associated with greater wellbeing gains for participants. The report makes recommendations for the future development of the programme.

Age-friendly and inclusive volunteering: review of community contributions in later life

JOPLING Kate, JONES Dan
2018

This review considers how to enable more people to contribute to their communities, in later life (defined as aged 50 and over), with a focus on increasing participation among underrepresented groups, especially those in poor health or living with long-term health conditions. It covers activities such as neighbourliness, helping in the community and volunteering. It draws on a range of sources including a call for evidence, a call for practice and seven roundtable meetings involving over 100 participants. The report looks at why people get involved with their communities and how contributing to communities can improve social connections, and lead to increased life satisfaction and wellbeing; how volunteering can change across the life course; and the practical, structural and emotional barriers to contributing to communities. It sets out a framework for age-friendly, inclusive volunteering, which includes for volunteering to: be flexible and to fit around life changes; to provide support and training needed; to provide opportunities to be sociable and feel connected; value volunteers; provide meaningful activity; and make good use of strengths and experiences. The review makes recommendations for the voluntary, public and private sectors on how to tackle the barriers to enable people to continue to volunteer throughout their lifetime. Case studies of good practice are included throughout the report.

Dementia-friendly Brent: a model of community

TILKI Mary
2018

Report on the London borough of Brent's dynamic social movement helping to make the borough dementia friendly. Community Action on Dementia Brent (CADBrent) is a dynamic social movement that aims to make the London borough dementia friendly, accessible and inclusive of black and minority ethnic (BME) communities. Much has been achieved since the movement began five years ago. Some of the schemes discussed in the article include: Dementia peer support project; dementia friendly Mapesbury; The De-Cafe - memory cafe; Whole street of support; The Shed and Parnerships in Innovative Education.

'My nature' - an effective tool for residential care

BREWIN Wendy, ORR Noreen, GARSIDE Ruth
2018

Experiencing nature is increasingly recognised as having a positive impact on the health and wellbeing of older people living in care homes. This practice example of "My Nature" activities toolkit designed to solve the problem of access to green spaces, which can be difficult for older people with dementia in care homes. Sensory Trust and the University of Exeter collaborated on developing 'My Nature', an evidence based training toolkit to help care staff identify ways in which nature can not only play a role in a resident's care plan but also support them in their work. The toolkit consists of: evidence booklets, nature based activities and a wall chart. The toolkit was piloted and then evaluated to see how far it could achieve the health and wellbeing gains that access to nature can provide. Two care homes in Cornwall participated in the pilot. Activities demonstrated in the pilots include: nature palettes, nature mapping, painting by nature and a tea tasting party. Key findings from the evaluation: the activities succeeded in getting residents out into the gardens and also stimulated interaction, enjoyment and pleasure. For staff, the activities proved to be adaptable to different contexts, could be planned in advanced and person-centred. Challenges identified include: the activities did not appear to appeal to male residents and care home culture.

VCSE sector engagement and social prescribing

VEASEY Phil, NEFF Jennifer, MONK-OZGUL Leeann
2018

This report, commissioned by the Greater London Authority, looks at the role of the voluntary, community and social enterprise (VCSE) sector in delivering social prescribing in London and the challenges and opportunities the sector faces. It draws on case studies to highlight good and effective practice and successful partnerships models. It also outlines the resources required in terms of leadership, staff training, fundraising, technological, capacity building and other support to build an effective business case for voluntary and community-sector organisations to engage with social prescribing. The final sections suggest ways to engage voluntary sector organisations in the development and delivery of a social prescribing strategy in London and identifies specific roles for the Mayor and GLA for taking forward social prescribing. The report draws consultation with 100 experts across the VCSE sector, commissioners from the statutory-sector commissioners and representatives of the health and social care sectors.

The Me, Myself and I Club: Briton Ferry: a case study in warm humanity and meaningful co-production

ME MYSELF AND I CLUB
2018

Describes the development and achievements of the Me, Myself and I Club, an initiative based on co-production principles and designed to support people with dementia and their carers. The club offers carers and people with dementia the opportunity to meet up with other local people in their position, enjoy activities like bingo, baking and table tennis and access respite care services, including relationship-centred short breaks in the local community that do not require the separation of carers from the people they support. The ethos of the club is to challenge negative stereotypes of people with dementia and the traditional service culture which does to, rather than with people. Member of the club also recognise a need for greater understanding about dementia in the local community and are committed to raising awareness and understanding of what it feels like to be living with dementia, and how other people can be helpful not hurtful. The Club runs a Community Care Training and Volunteer Academy offering up to 12 weeks of training and 12 hours voluntary work for people considering employment in the care sector. Over the years, the Me, Myself and I Club has developed links and partnerships with a range of national and local initiatives, including the Dementia Engagement and Empowerment Project (DEEP).

Health 2020 priority area four: creating supportive environments and resilient communities: a compendium of inspirational examples


2018

Brings together innovative examples of actions taken in 13 countries to strengthen resilience and build supportive environments for population health and well-being. The examples show how building resilience can be achieved by developing and sustaining partnerships between institutions and communities; by community action and bottom-up efforts; at system level, both nationally and locally. The examples, primarily gathered from community initiatives, are linked to the four types of resilience capacities: adaptive, absorptive, anticipatory and transformative. Topics covered include the role of resilience building in addressing human rights, health inequities, environmental hazards, and health-related topics such as communicable and noncommunicable diseases. Examples from the UK include: Promoting social connections and community networks for older people through Better in Sheffield; Supporting local systems to tackle the social determinants of health inequalities; Strengthening resilience through the early intervention and prevention: breaking the generational cycle of crime project; and A social movement for health and resilience in Blackburn with Darwen. Each example attempts to describe: the action undertaken; the resilience-related issue that the action aimed to address; and the impact and lessons learnt in the process of strengthening resilience.

Results 11 - 20 of 96

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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