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Results for 'case studies'

Results 11 - 20 of 60

Mobilising communities: insights on community action for health and wellbeing

KERN Ruth, HOLMAN Annette
2017

Summarises key insights from the Mobilising Communities programme, which explored ways of implementing ‘social movements' in health that bring together people's strengths and capacity, community resources and publicly funded services to improve health and wellbeing in communities. The three sites participating in the programme were: the Bromley by Bow Centre and Health Partnership; Spice and Lancashire County Council; and Horsham and Mid Sussex Clinical Commissioning Group. The report briefly summarises the approaches taken by the three sites, which include social prescribing, Time Banking and peer support. The three elements identified as the most important in supporting communities to develop social movements in health were: helping people help themselves; creating opportunities for people to help one another, and creating value between the professional and social spheres. The report shows how each of the three elements can be developed to support a social movement in health for people and communities. Appendices provide flow diagrams to illustrate how each of the three sites implemented the approach. The programme was funded by the government’s Social Action team and delivered by Nesta Health Lab and the Behavioral Insights Team (BIT).

The role of housing in effective hospital discharge

SKILLS FOR CARE, CHARTERED INSTITUTE OF HOUSING
2017

A collection of case studies from a wide range of housing providers, highlighting the role they can play in developing hospital discharge services. The case studies demonstrate the development of effective partnerships to meet hospital discharge needs, how these partnerships can help meet partners’ targets, and the workforce skills required to ensure effective services. Key learning points from the case studies include recognising and understanding different working cultures; building lasting relationships; effective and safe communication of information between agencies; developing sustainable and long term provision; and building a person centred solution. The publication will be particularly useful for social care and health commissioners, providers of housing and support and workforce development leads.

Local community initiatives in Western Bay: formative evaluation summary report

SWANSEA UNIVERSITY
2016

An evaluation of the early implementation of Local Area Coordination (LAC) and Local Community Coordination (LCC) in Neath Port Talbot and Swansea, covering recruitment and initial delivery activities between July 2015 and April 2016. The initiative used both LAC and LCC coordinators to help communities to develop local relationships and support, reduce dependence on services and create conditions for long-term resilience. The evaluation identifies positive outcomes for people, communities and local finances; highlights factors which help create the conditions for good outcomes; and provides recommendations for the development and improvement of LAC. The report also contains case study examples to show how the initiative was able to help individuals. The results of the evaluation found good progress in both LAC and LCC areas, including community engagement, identifying community assets and individuals for support. It also found LAC helped development of strong and sustained personal networks for individuals and communities, reducing isolation and helping to build local resilience. The LAC implementation in Swansea demonstrated cost benefits of £800k - £1.2m, with expected benefits to rise when LAC is embedded more fully within communities. Findings and recommendations are listed across a number of key themes, including: strategy, funding, shared learning, leadership, information recording, recruitment and roles, cost benefits.

Public health working with the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector: new opportunities and sustainable change

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, VOLUNTEERING MATTERS
2017

A collection of case study examples which show how public health and the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector (VCSE) are working together to improve people's health and wellbeing. The case studies cover the themes of: positive partnership and engagement between public health and the VCSE sector; commissioning and new delivery models; supporting a financially sustainable future; integrating services; and community-centred approaches. Case studies include an initiative to tackle social isolation and loneliness in older people; an integrated lifestyle and wellness support services for people at the greatest risk of poor health outcomes; and lonely, and socially isolated a marginalised people. Each case study includes an overview of the service, evaluation findings where available and key learning from the initiative. Suggestions for good practice in partnership working between public health and the VCSE sector are also included.

Social prescribing: a pathway to work?

STEADMAN Karen, THOMAS Rosemary, DONNALOJA Victoria
2017

This paper considers the social prescribing model through an employment lens. An initial review of the grey and academic literature uncovered little reference to the role of work in this context. This has not been a key feature of previous large-scale studies on social prescribing, which is itself a relatively new area of research and practice. The study took a two stage exploratory approach, comprising: a short survey with members of the UK Social Prescribing Network to better understand their experience of social prescribing, and where work fits in their views; and four case studies of social prescribing services, to explore how each service works, is delivered and experienced by clients in order to learn how social prescribing is, in practice, achieving a wide range of health and social outcomes, potentially including work. The aim of social prescribing is to help individuals find non-clinical solutions which will improve their health and wellbeing. Though it is unlikely that people will access or be referred to social prescribing services for the primary purpose of achieving work the paper argues that there are benefits in making work a more central part of the services, given that work is an important determinant of health and wellbeing. The paper identifies a number of elements that are critical to ensuring social prescribing can contribute positively to improving work-related outcomes for clients. These are: an engaged link worker; a patient-centred approach; strong links with a wide range of good quality community support; the ability to fill gaps in existing community support; and strong links (preferably co-location) with GPs. The paper also considers a number of barriers to improving work outcomes through social prescribing, which are: limited focus on health and wellbeing and health service use; lack of expertise around work and related challenges (e.g. welfare system); short-termism in service provision; low availability and quality of local service provision; and poor awareness of work as a health outcome.

Working with faith groups to promote health and wellbeing

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2017

This report, published in association with FaithAction, looks at how local authorities and faith groups can work together to improve the health and wellbeing outcomes of communities. It also highlights examples of good practice from across the country, and from different faiths, to demonstrate the wide range of activity taking place. The report covers how faith groups can improve health outcomes and tackle health inequalities; the benefits of joint working for councils, health organisations and faith groups; barriers to collaboration and what local authorities can do to make sure the widest range of groups are involved; and looks at ways of establishing effective partnerships and activities, including through adopting the national Faith Covenant. The report includes questions for councils and faith groups to assess whether there is more that can be done to work well together. It also signposts to useful resources for further learning and action.

Reducing delayed transfer of care through housing interventions: evidence of impact. Case study

ADAMS Sue
2016

A case study and independent evaluation of a housing intervention designed to help older patients to return home from hospital more rapidly and safety. The initiative is delivered by West of England Care & Repair (WE C&R), who organise clutter clearance/deep cleaning; urgent home repairs, emergency heating repairs and essential housing adaptations for older people in hospital. The evaluation examined all case records, interviewed 15 hospital staff and undertook an in depth analysis of a sample of 4 cases. Analysis of the case records estimated a saving in hospital bed days of £13,526. The cost of housing interventions was £948, resulting in a cost benefit ratio of 14:1. Additional savings in hospital staff time amounted to a further £897. A short case study illustrates how the service was able to help one woman return home from hospital. It concludes that the small scale evaluation is indicative of the potential savings that a practical and effective home from hospital housing intervention service can generate for the health service.

Testing promising approaches to reducing loneliness: results and learnings of Age UK's loneliness Pilot

AGE UK
2016

This report shares the results of Age UK’s loneliness pilot programme, which aimed to find out Age UK services could better reach older people experiencing loneliness, develop individually tailored solutions and help older people access activities and services within their community. Chapter one outlines origins of the programme, which involved eight local Age UKs in a 12 month pilot. Local services developed three common approaches: recruiting ‘eyes on the ground’ to identify older people experiencing, or at risk of, loneliness; developing co-operative networks with other agencies; and use of traditional befriending services. Chapter two highlights examples of services that local Age UKs are delivering and how the adoption of certain approaches improved their impact on lonely older people. Chapter three look at some of the impacts of the programme. It found that a large number of the older people supported during the programme experienced a reduction in their loneliness scores. This was especially true amongst older people who were often lonely. Some older people also identified feelings of increased independence, wellbeing and connectedness with people. Chapter four outlines the next steps for the Age UK programme.

Integrated care for older people with frailty: innovative approaches in practice

ROYAL COLLEGE OF GENERAL PRACTITIONERS, BRITISH GERIATRICS SOCIETY
2016

Joint report showing how GPs and geriatricians are collaborating to design innovative schemes to improve the provision of integrated care for older people with frailty. The report highlights 13 case studies from across the UK which show what an integrated health and social care system looks like in practice and the positive impact it can have. The case studies are grouped into three areas: schemes to help older people remain active and independent, extending primary and community support to provide better services in the community, and integrated care to support patients in hospital. The examples cover a range of locations across the UK, including urban and rural populations, and a range of settings, including services based in the community, in GP practices, in care homes and in hospitals. Whilst the majority of the initiatives led by GPs or geriatricians, they illustrate the vital role that many other professionals play, including nurses, therapists, pharmacists and social workers. The report also outlines some common themes from the case studies, which include person-centred care, multidisciplinary working, taking a proactive approach and making use of resources in the community.

Helping people look after themselves: a guide on self care

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2016

Brings together eight case studies which show how local authorities in England are involved in a range of innovative schemes to encourage self-care and self-management of long term conditions. The case studies covering both rural and urban environments and with varying levels of deprivation and affluence. The examples include: a network of integrated teams to work with residents at risk; development of a website to help people with long-term conditions to become more involved in self-care; a hotline to promote health lifestyles and self-care, linking people with local services in the local authority, NHS and voluntary sector; a programme to tackle loneliness and social isolation in older people, improve health and wellbeing; Nottingham’s ‘super’ self-care pilot, which includes social prescribing and care navigators; and work in Kirklees which is encouraging the self-management of long term conditions through education, technology, exercise and one-on-one help.

Results 11 - 20 of 60

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