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Results for 'case studies'

Results 31 - 40 of 60

Just what the doctor ordered: social prescribing - a guide for local authorities

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2016

Social prescribing, sometimes called community referrals, is a way of enabling primary care services to refer patients with social, emotional or practical needs to a range of local community services and activities to improve their health and wellbeing. This publication highlights the role of local authorities in facilitating social prescribing and provides nine short case studies to show how councils are working across England.

Making the change: behavioural factors in person- and community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing

BURD Hannah, HALLSWORTH Michael
2016

This report explores the behavioural science theories that suggest new ways of enabling people and communities to take a more active role in managing their own health and provides an accessible introduction to the theories of change. The report is structured around the three areas of capability, opportunity and motivation which researchers have identified as needing to be present for behaviour to occur. It highlights that a multi-faceted approach is needed to enable effective self-care. It identifies five enabling factors that that can influence engagement and self-management behaviours: a growth mindset where people view capabilities as something that can be developed, removing ‘friction costs’, social networks, motivation and goal setting. It also suggests how these factors can be targeted in order to encourage these behaviours. Examples and case studies illustrate the application of the theories. The report is aimed at policymakers, commissioners, service designers and organisations working to promote more person- and community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing.

Developing a wellbeing and strengths-based approach to social work practice: changing culture

GOLLINS Tim, et al
2016

This report discusses the need to for social workers in adult social care to change their workforce culture to one that is 'strengths-based' for promoting well-being, early intervention and prevention. It examines the value of this approach in creating better outcomes for people living more actively in their local communities, generating greater satisfaction for people using services and their carers; and creating a motivated workforce. The report then sets out the key knowledge and skills the social care workforce needs to apply strengths-based approaches in improving people’s lives. It also considers the emerging business case for how a community-focused strengths-based approach can deliver efficiencies for the sector. Cases study examples from Shropshire, Essex County Council, Hertfordshire and Calderdale show how councils and their health partners are developing new ways of working to deliver an alternative health and social care operating model.

Local early action: how to make it happen

COOTE Anna, BUA Adrian
2015

Reports on the work of the Southwark and Lambeth Early Action Commission which was set up to explore ways of taking local early action and preventative measures to improve people’s quality of life and reduce pressure on public services. The Commission carried out a review of local strategy, policy and practice; explored more than 30 examples of good practice in the two boroughs and further afield; and engaged with local residents and community-based groups and with other experts, through workshops and interviews. The Commission found the underlying causes of most social problems could be traced to the same social and economic challenges. Although some of these challenges, such as poverty and inequality were linked to national policy, making it hard to tackle them locally areas were identified where local early action could be effective in prevent problems. The Commission identified four goals for early action in Southwark and Lambeth: developing resourceful communities, where residents and groups act as agents of change; preventative places, where the quality of neighbourhoods has a positive impact on how people feel and enables them to help themselves and each other; strong partnerships between organisations; and where local institutions support early action. Case studies of good practice to support the report’s recommendations for prevention and early action are included.

Delivering a healthier future: how CCGs are leading the way on prevention and early diagnosis

NHS CLINICAL COMMISSIONERS
2016

Focusing on prevention and early diagnosis, the case studies in this publication demonstrate the impact clinical commissioning groups are making in a wide range of areas including mental health care, early diagnosis of cancer and stroke prevention. They show how CCGs are taking the lead in preventing illness and the causes of ill health – and working to keep people out of hospital where possible; how they are helping to ensure that people are diagnosed earlier and given the support that they need; and they are working across boundaries to build on what people want and need to help them lead longer, healthier lives. More specifically the case studies provide examples of: working proactively with older people living with frailty; addressing preventable early deaths; supporting people to prevent and manage diabetes; reducing hospital admissions in people with COPD; managing c. difficile infections in the community; improving access to health services for homeless people; taking a strategic approach to stroke prevention; addressing early diagnosis of cancer; earlier diagnosis and prevention of HIV; improving early diagnosis and treatment of people with atrial fibrillation; working with the voluntary sector; impact of Living Well; and social prescribing to improve outcomes.

People helping people: year two of the pioneer programme

NHS ENGLAND
2016

Describes the journey taken over the last year by the integrated care pioneers. The 25 pioneer sites are developing and testing new and different ways of joining up health and social care services across England, utilising the expertise of the voluntary and community sector, with the aim of improving care, quality and effectiveness of services being provided. The report describes the progress, challenges and lessons learnt across the pioneers. A number of key themes have emerged, including: population segmentation to determine people’s characteristics, their needs and care demands; using the experience of people; providing proactive care; providing integrated care services; supporting integration through using shared care records; using technology to support different access points; analysing impacts through data; and removing financial disincentives. Also included within the report are pioneers’ stories which describe the core elements of their care models and showcase how these are impacting real people.

The role of case studies as evidence in public health

KORJONEN Helena, et al
2016

This study uses a mixed methods approach, comprising a literature review, a content analysis of a sample of case studies and a small number of qualitative interviews on the use and usefulness of case studies, to define, explore and make recommendations around the nature and use of case studies in public health. It suggests that case studies capture local knowledge of programmes and services, and illustrate processes and outcomes that cannot be captured in other ways, and that this is what makes them valuable. The report argues that case studies would benefit from guidelines and templates to improve the format, replicability and assessment and that they would benefit from a higher rating in evidence hierarchies as they often describe complex interventions, implementation and different contexts.

Collaborative healthcare: supporting CCGs and HWBs to support integrated personal commissioning and collaborative care

INCLUSIVE CHANGE
2015

A short guide providing new approaches and practice examples of how Clinical Commissioning Groups and Health Wellbeing Boards can commission and support interventions which embody the principles of collaborative care, individual choice and control and patient and public participation. The six approaches presented are: Experts by experience and self-advocacy; Self-directed support and personal health budgets; Capabilities and asset-based approaches to health and care; Co-production and citizen led commissioning; Community development and building social capital; and Networked models of care. Each includes accompanying practice examples. The guide has been produced by the Inclusive Change partnership of Shared Lives Plus, Community Catalysts, In Control, Inclusion North and Inclusive Neighbourhoods.

Our communities, our mental health: commissioning for better public mental health

MIND
2015

This guide provides a background to public mental health, examining what it is, prevention types and risk factors, why it should be invested in and how to target interventions most effectively. The document sets out a framework of principles and good practice for designing and commissioning public mental health programmes, which include: work in partnership; understand your community and who is at high-risk; monitor and evaluate impacts; commission interventions across the life course; and address both physical and mental health. A range of practical case studies are provided to help commission successful public mental health programmes in local areas.

The district council contribution to public health: a time of challenge and opportunity

BUCK David, DUNN Phoebe
2015

A contribution to the understanding, assessment and development of the role of district councils in improving the health of their citizens and communities. The report sets out what determines health, why district councils have an important role to play in shaping it, and the public health system and policy context in which district councils operate. It describes the key areas in which district council functions contribute to public health and provides a quick guide to the high level economics of public health for district councils. In addition, the report presents key evidence, including the impact on health, effectiveness and, where available, cost-effectiveness and return on investment, for each of the core functions of housing, green space and leisure, and environmental health services, arguing that district councils’ wider enabling role, in economic development, planning and engaging with their communities has benefits for health. A number of short case studies of innovation in service delivery in relation to health and wellbeing are also included. In the final section the report outlines a set of high-level recommendations for district councils and other stakeholders to ensure that they take advantage of the opportunities on offer.

Results 31 - 40 of 60

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