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Results for 'case studies'

Results 51 - 60 of 60

Getting better outcomes: personal budgets and older people: follow up report, March 2015

ROUTLEDGE Martin, et al
2015

Presents the latest information about personal budgets for older people, showing that older people experience positive benefits from having a personal budget, although these are not as marked as for other groups. The first section reflects briefly on recent changes to the policy context and then highlights new data about the performance of councils from the recent 2014 ADASS survey, and the third National Personal Budget survey from In Control. It then draws on research and recent TLAP events, which considered minimum processes and self-directed support, to review what does and doesn't work best for older people. The second section of this report presents some examples of what councils are doing to address the ongoing challenges both of the initial report and the current policy context. The case studies are summarised in Table. Section 3 examines personalisation and safeguarding, and specifically, whether personal budgets increase risks to older people whilst section 4 considers integration and the opportunities that government policy affords older people in relation to personalisation. In its conclusion, the report recommends that there needs to be further evidence of what is being done to support the use of personal budgets by older people.

Promising approaches: to reducing loneliness and isolation in later life

JOPLING Kate
2015

This report raises concerns that loneliness and social isolation among older people is becoming a serious public health issue. It draws on the views of experts and research evidence to set out a new framework for understanding and tackling loneliness in older people. The approach is based around three key challenges: reaching individuals; understanding the specific circumstances of an individual's loneliness; and supporting individuals to take up services that would help. Sections of the report cover: the foundation services (reaching, understanding and supporting individuals); the types of intervention that are most likely to meet older people's need for social contact; how technology and transport can facilitate social connection; and 'structural enablers' focusing on how services are delivered (i.e., at neighbourhood level, community development, volunteering, and age positive approaches). It also highlights areas where a greater understanding of how to address loneliness within the older community is needed: within care settings; in black and minority ethnic groups; and with lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans older people. Case studies are used throughout to demonstrate the variety of solutions needed to address a very personal and individual problem. Includes specific recommendations for service providers, commissioners and those involved with search.

Wiltshire Council: help to live at home service: an outcome-based approach to social care: case study report

OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care
2012

The case study describes the process that Wiltshire Council has used to develop its new ‘Help to Live at Home Service’ for older people and others who require help to remain at home. The approach focused on the outcomes that the older people wish to gain from social care. It involved a complete overhaul of the social care system from the role of the social worker working alongside the customer to determine the required outcomes to the role of the providers of the service who must deliver these outcomes and receive payment based on that delivery. The report aims to promote discussion about how outcomes-based, personalised support can best work in social care in England in the future.

No assumptions: a narrative for personalised, coordinated care and support in mental health

NATIONAL VOICES, THINK LOCAL ACT PERSONAL
2014

Describes some critical outcomes and success factors in the care, support and treatment of people who use mental health services, from their perspective. It is aimed at helping commissioners and service providers to organise person centred care and recovery oriented support for mental and physical health, and to know when they are achieving it. It offers a definition of personalised, coordinated care in mental health, agreed by people who use mental health services and people who work in health and social care; a series of ‘I statements’, expressing what personalised, coordinated care looks and feels like and some case studies of personalised, coordinated care in practice.

Guidance for commissioners of mental health services for people from black and minority ethnic communities

JOINT COMMISSIONING PANEL FOR MENTAL HEALTH
2014

This guide describes what ‘good’ mental health services for people from Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) communities look like. While all of the Joint Commissioning Panel for Mental Health commissioning guides apply to all communities, there are good reasons why additional guidance is required on commissioning mental health services for people from BME communities. The document sets out the key priorities that should guide the commissioning of mental health services for BME groups. These include: supporting equitable access to effective interventions, and equitable experiences and outcomes; identifying and implementing specific measures to reduce ethnic inequalities in mental health; developing local strategies and plans for improving mental health and wellbeing amongst BME communities; making targeted investments in public mental health interventions for BME communities; involving service users, carers as well as members of local BME communities in the commissioning process; collecting, analysing, reporting, and acting upon data about ethnicity, service use, and outcomes; creating more accessible, broader, and flexible care pathways, and integrating services across the voluntary, community, social care and health sectors; ensuring every mental health service are culturally capable and able to address the diverse needs of a multi-cultural population through effective and appropriate forms of assessment and interventions; developing a number of strategies to reduce coercive care, which is experienced disproportionately by some BME groups. This guide focuses on services for working age adults. However, it could also be interpreted for commissioning specialist mental health services, such as CAMHS, secure psychiatric care, and services for older adults. It includes case-examples derived from an online survey of various BME stakeholder groups on the issue of quality in BME service provision

Commissioning befriending: a guide for adult social care commissioners

ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES
2014

A guide developed to inform commissioners of adult social care about how befriending services are being delivered across the South West and how to effectively commissioning high quality befriending services. It describes what befriending is; the different ways it can be delivered; and the positive benefits it can have through improving health, well being and increasing independence. It also explains how people and communities can be involved in delivering and developing services through volunteering. Case study examples of current befriending practice are used throughout. The guide also draws upon materials and guidance produced by the Mentoring and Befriending Foundation (MBF) and feedback from commissioners and befriending providers through a series of consultations undertaken by the MBF.

Building dementia-friendly communities: a priority for everyone

GREEN Geraldine, LAKEY Louise, ALZHEIMER'S SOCIETY
2013

The National Dementia Declaration for England (2010) identified that people with dementia want to live in communities that give them choice and control over their lives, provide services and support designed around their needs, and to feel valued and understood, and part of family, community and civic life. This report provides evidence of dementia-friendly communities in England, Wales and Northern Ireland from the perspective of people affected by dementia. It uses the results of a survey of people with dementia (510 respondents) distributed by Alzheimer’s Society staff and other networks in Autumn 2012 (referred to as the DFCsurvey) to explore the barriers that people face in their community, how they would like to be engaged in their local area, and the support they need to enable them to do so. Overall, the report aims to provide guidance to areas that are looking to become dementia-friendly, and to provide extra evidence for those already committed to becoming dementia-friendly. Evidence from people with dementia and their carers is collated alongside examples of projects that are making a difference for people with dementia. This information is used both to provide a definition of a dementia-friendly community, and to suggest 10 key areas of focus for communities to consider in working to become dementia friendly. These 10 key areas are: challenge stigma and build understanding; accessible community activities; acknowledge potential; ensure an early diagnosis; practical support to enable engagement in community life; community-based solutions; consistent and reliable travel options; easy to navigate environments; and respectful and responsive businesses and services. While there are some excellent examples of communities that are adapting themselves to the needs required by dementia, many people with dementia do not feel supported and a part of their local area; and are not able to take part in activities that they enjoyed before they developed the condition. Loneliness, feeling isolated and lack of confidence were identified as major barriers.

Ageing alone: loneliness and the 'oldest old'

KEMPTON James, TOMLIN Sam
2014

Loneliness occurs at all stages of life but little attention has been paid to its incidence and impact in the oldest old (85+), the fourth generation. This report begins by exploring: loneliness and why it matters; the incidence of loneliness in older people; and what is known about loneliness in the oldest old (85+). It then looks six contextual criteria that should be considered when initiating or commissioning interventions to tackle loneliness: rural and urban living; gender; health; living alone; community resilience; intergenerational interaction and ageism. Using case study analysis of projects that are tackling loneliness effectively, the report then explores practical steps that can be taken to reduce levels of loneliness among the oldest old. The case studies include one-to-one interventions, group services and building social networks; and encouraging wider community engagement. The case studies also illustrate the continued willingness of individuals of all ages to get involved in their local community. Whereas people might once have volunteered informally to help people they knew, ‘permission’ to initiate contact, through formalised and structured opportunities, is important. This is an important pointer as to how our modern society can organise itself to help address loneliness.

Technical guide: building a business case for prevention

SOCIAL FINANCE
2014

This guide sets out the issues that need to be considered when developing a business case to invest in preventive services and to ensure that any decision are based on robust and reliable data. The guide focuses on the following arguments: the importance of 'investing to save', arguing that prevention is cheaper in the long term; promotion of service innovation; placing the focus of commissioning on outcomes rather than outputs; and managing a shift in spending from acute to prevention to reduce demand over time. The guide outlines key four activities required to build a business case: understanding needs; understanding current costs; assessing possible interventions; and deciding how to measure the value and outcome of the interventions. It also provides a summary business case for prevention and using a Social Impact Bond (SBI) to finance a business case for prevention. An example case study of making a business case for prevention services in early years services in Greater Manchester is included.

Prevention matters: delivering a prevention-focused model for adult services in Buckinghamshire County Council

BUCKINGHAMSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL
2012

Sets out a prevention-focused model of adult health and social care services which place emphasis on maintaining people’s independence and resilience; preventing deterioration into substantial or critical categories of need. The document outlines the current system challenges, the existing lack of joint working between sectors and services, a reactive approach to creating support services and networks and a lack of confidence or capacity to innovate and invest in prevention without an evidence base or business case. It then presents a framework for building the evidence for investment in prevention, proposing a measurement methodology and a definition of the target user group and of outcomes and impact. The document puts forward a new prevention-orientated service model, identifying the high‐level functions, which are shared by different agents and delivery mechanisms, on which the model rests. These are: intelligence and knowledge about the effectiveness of prevention‐related activities, bridging and building networks between formal and informal service delivery, connecting people, maximising existing resources and motivating and enabling. The document examines the core components of the model, which include an intelligence hub, a volunteer hub, community links officers, and community prevention officers. Funding and implementation considerations are also included.

Results 51 - 60 of 60

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