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Results for 'commissioning'

Results 11 - 20 of 36

Joint review of partnerships and investment in voluntary, community and social enterprise organisations in the health and care sector

GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health, PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND, NHS ENGLAND
2016

This joint review sets out the role of the voluntary, community and social enterprise (VCSE) sector in improving health, wellbeing and care outcomes and identifies how the sector can best address potential challenges and maximise opportunities. The report places wellbeing at the centre of health and care services, and making VCSE organisations an integral part of a collaborative system. It makes 28 recommendations for government, health and care system partners, funders, regulatory bodies and the VCSE sector. Chapters: explore the contribution that VCSE organisations can play in reducing the human and financial costs associated with health inequalities, often through peer- and community-led activity; the benefits of partnership working and collaboration between commissioners, VCSE organisations and individuals; the importance of evidence and impact assessment, and how both can be used more effectively in health and care services; and the importance of commissioning practice, identifying a number of key principles that should underpin the funding relationship between public sector bodies and the VCSE sector. Each chapter looks at what is needed to achieve success and includes short case studies. The final chapters discuss the role of VCSE infrastructure bodies and set out the value of the Voluntary Sector Improvement Programme and recommendations for its future focus. Recommendations include the need for health and care services to be co-produced, focussed on wellbeing and valuing individuals' and communities' capacities and for social value to become a fundamental part of health and care commissioning and service provision.

Social prescribing for mental health: a guide to commissioning and delivery

FRIEDLI Lynne
2008

This guidance describes the use of non-medical interventions, sometimes called ‘social prescribing’ or ‘community referral’, to improve mental health and wellbeing. Social prescribing supports improved access both to psychological treatments and to interventions addressing the wider determinants of mental health. It can contribute to greater awareness of the relative contribution to mental wellbeing of individual psychological skills and attributes (e.g. autonomy, positive affect and self-efficacy) and the circumstances of people’s lives: housing, employment, income and status. The guide: examines the benefits of social prescribing; outlines the policy context and evidence base for social prescribing; gives guidance on commissioning social prescribing; provides information on interventions and how to deliver social prescribing; and describes the findings of a social prescribing development project commissioned by Care Services Improvement Partnership (CSIP) North West. Overall, the guidance aims to support localities in developing, implementing and evaluating social prescribing schemes, with a special focus on mental health and wellbeing. The report recommends that social prescribing is made available as part of prevention and early intervention within primary care, and also to support recovery from severe mental distress.

Collaborative healthcare: supporting CCGs and HWBs to support integrated personal commissioning and collaborative care

INCLUSIVE CHANGE
2015

A short guide providing new approaches and practice examples of how Clinical Commissioning Groups and Health Wellbeing Boards can commission and support interventions which embody the principles of collaborative care, individual choice and control and patient and public participation. The six approaches presented are: Experts by experience and self-advocacy; Self-directed support and personal health budgets; Capabilities and asset-based approaches to health and care; Co-production and citizen led commissioning; Community development and building social capital; and Networked models of care. Each includes accompanying practice examples. The guide has been produced by the Inclusive Change partnership of Shared Lives Plus, Community Catalysts, In Control, Inclusion North and Inclusive Neighbourhoods.

Our communities, our mental health: commissioning for better public mental health

MIND
2015

This guide provides a background to public mental health, examining what it is, prevention types and risk factors, why it should be invested in and how to target interventions most effectively. The document sets out a framework of principles and good practice for designing and commissioning public mental health programmes, which include: work in partnership; understand your community and who is at high-risk; monitor and evaluate impacts; commission interventions across the life course; and address both physical and mental health. A range of practical case studies are provided to help commission successful public mental health programmes in local areas.

Building the right support: a national plan to develop community services and close inpatient facilities for people with learning disability...including those with a mental health condition

NHS ENGLAND, LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES
2015

Sets out a national plan to enable people with learning disabilities who display behaviour that challenges to be supported to live more independently in their local community and reduce reliance on institutional care and long stay hospitals. The plan looks at the learning from the six 'fast track' areas; describes the new services that will be needed to better support people with learning disabilities to live in the community; and outlines how transforming care partnerships (commissioning collaborations of local authorities, CCGs and NHS England partners) in health and care will need to work together to deliver these changes. Areas discussed include: the need for appropriate local housing, such as schemes where people have their own home but ready access to on-site support staff; an expansion of the use of personal budgets, enabling people and their families to plan their own care, beyond those who already have a legal right to them; for people to have access to a local care and support navigator or key worker; and investment in advocacy and advice services run by local charities and voluntary organisations. To achieve the shift from inpatient to community-based services the plan identifies three key changes: that local councils and NHS bodies will join together to deliver better and more coordinated services; pooled budgets between the NHS and local councils to ensure the right care is provided in the right place; and adoption of a new service model.

Knowledge exchange in health-care commissioning: case studies of the use of commercial, not-for-profit and public sector agencies, 2011-14

WYE Lesley, et al
2015

The aim of this study was to explore how commissioners obtained, modified and used information to inform their decisions, focusing in particular in the knowledge obtained from external organisations such as management consultancies, Public Health and commissioning support units. In eight case studies, researchers interviewed 92 external consultants and their clients, observed 25 meetings and training sessions, and analysed documents such as meeting minutes and reports. Data were analysed within each case study and then across all case studies. Commissioners used many types of information from multiple sources to try to build a cohesive, persuasive case. They obtained information through five channels: interpersonal relationships people placement (e.g. embedding external staff within client teams); governance (e.g. national directives); copy, adapt and paste (e.g. best practice guidance); and product deployment (e.g. software tools). Furthermore, commissioners constantly interpreted (and reinterpreted) the knowledge to fit local circumstances (contextualisation) and involved others in this refinement process (engagement). External organisations that drew on these multiple channels and facilitated contextualisation and engagement were more likely to meet clients’ expectations. Sometimes there was little impact on commissioning decisions because the work of external organisations targeted and benefited the commissioning decision-makers less than the health-care analysts. The long-standing split between health-care analysts and commissioners sometimes limited the impact of external organisations. The paper concludes that to capitalise on the expertise of external providers, wherever possible, contracts should include explicit skills development and knowledge transfer components.

A call to action: commissioning for prevention

NHS ENGLAND
2013

This document sets out a framework intended to help clinical commissioning groups think about how to commission for effective prevention. Commissioning for prevention is one potentially transformative change that CCGs can make, together with Health and Wellbeing Boards and their other local partners. The paper argues that whether on grounds of health need, cost or public expectations the case for developing a wellness rather than solely an illness service is compelling. This can be achieved by effectively commissioning for prevention through the following steps: analysing the most important health problems at population level; working together with partners and the community, setting common goals or priorities; identifying high-impact prevention programmes focused on the top causes of premature mortality and chronic disability; planning the resource profile needed to deliver prevention goals; and measuring impact and experimenting rapidly.

Fit for frailty: part 2: developing, commissioning and managing services for people living with frailty in community settings

BRITISH GERIATRICS SOCIETY, ROYAL COLLEGE OF GENERAL PRACTITIONERS
2015

Provides advice and guidance on the development, commissioning and management of services for people living with frailty in community settings. The first section introduces the concept of frailty and sets out the rationale for developing frailty services. The second section explores the essential characteristics of a good service. The third section considers the issue of performance and outcome measures for frailty services. The appendix to the report includes eight case studies of services which are operating in different parts of the UK. The audience for this guidance comprises GPs, geriatricians, health service managers, social service managers and commissioners of services. It is a companion report to an earlier BGS publication, Fit for Frailty Part 1 which provided advice and guidance on the care of older people living with frailty in community and outpatient settings.

Community-led care and support: a new paradigm

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2015

Reports on the key messages from a roundtable discussion on community-led care. The event was hosted by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) and is one of a series of roundtable discussions exploring how to improve care and support at a time of growing demand, demographic change and financial constraint. The discussion aimed to identify, celebrate, support and learn from community-led activity and support and identify practical steps stakeholders can take to support community-led services. The report includes summaries of the presentations from those attending from the organisations: Skillnet Group Community Interest Company, Community Catalysts, Carers UK, Sheffield City Council, and Lloyds Bank Foundation. It also includes views from the round table. Key messages from the event are summarised in four key areas: the positive impact of community-led services; challenges and barriers; building and sustaining community-led services, and enabling community-led services to thrive. The roundtable identified the need to reduce the unnecessary barriers that small, local, user-led services often face in terms of regulations and in building up evidence to support commissioning and investment.

Emerging practice in outcome-based commissioning for social care: discussion paper

BOLTON John
2015

This paper is a progress report exploring the lessons learnt from a variety of approaches taken by councils to outcome-based commissioning in adult social care (sometimes called 'payment by results'). It considers some of the opportunities and risks that arise from taking this approach. The paper puts the emerging practice in social care in a context with other developments within the public sector; explores current practices in social care from a small number of councils and looks at the advantages and risks in taking this approach. It suggests that this approach could deliver better outcomes for people at a lower cost if the transaction costs can be limited. The paper draws on discussions with providers, commissioners and customers receiving services. The development of thinking in local authorities in recent times has shown a new emphasis on interventions that either prevent or reduce someone’s need for longer term care. This is supported by the evidence for the benefits from reablement for older people, the recovery model in mental health and the emerging progression model in learning disability services. Outcomes based commissioning is, in part, a natural evolution of the way in which commissioning might take place when a council is seeking improved outcomes for its customers as a result of the resources it purchases or deploys. The report argues that the overall expectation is that if a provider can produce outcomes for customers that may reduce their need for longer term care they should be rewarded. At the same time if fewer people need longer term care this will reduce the overall costs to the council. The benefits can then be shared between commissioners and providers of services.

Results 11 - 20 of 36

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