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Results for 'communities'

Results 31 - 33 of 33

Outcomes of the active at 60 community agent programme: research report

HATAMIAN Areenay, PEARMAIN Daniel, GOLDEN Sarah
2012

The Active at 60 Community Agents programme was a Department for Work and Pensions fund to encourage community groups and their volunteers to help people approaching and post retirement (particularly those at risk of social isolation and loneliness in later life) to stay or become active and positively engaged with society. It was launched in March 2011 and ran until December 2011. This evaluation of the programme included surveys and interviews with local funders, group leaders, community agents (volunteers whose role aimed to empower and support older people to become and/or stay active) and older people. The report describes the background and methodology of the study and presents the findings, covering the role of Community Agents, reaching and engaging older people, what groups did with the funding, what difference the programme made to older people who took part and wider benefits, the legacy of the programme, and the role of local funders and programme management. It also discusses how far the programme achieved its aims and sets out key lessons learned.

Evidence review: loneliness in later life

DAVIDSON Susan, ROSSALL Phil
2014

A summary of available evidence from research on loneliness in the community in later life. Loneliness can be understood as an individual’s personal, subjective sense of lacking desired affection, closeness, and social interaction with others. Over 1 million older people say they are always or often feel lonely and nearly half of them say that television or pets are their main form of company. The report reviews the literature on measuring and quantifying loneliness and on factors associated with loneliness in later life, including age, ethnicity and language, sex, living arrangements and marital status, geography, housing, health, income, informal care and sexual orientation. The review considers the evidence on the impact of loneliness on older people and the most common social interaction interventions for older people. These include: specialised groups targeting older people, community engagement, befriending, gatekeeping, and the internet. The review includes an appendix on social support and its sources.

Building dementia-friendly communities: a priority for everyone

GREEN Geraldine, LAKEY Louise, ALZHEIMER'S SOCIETY
2013

The National Dementia Declaration for England (2010) identified that people with dementia want to live in communities that give them choice and control over their lives, provide services and support designed around their needs, and to feel valued and understood, and part of family, community and civic life. This report provides evidence of dementia-friendly communities in England, Wales and Northern Ireland from the perspective of people affected by dementia. It uses the results of a survey of people with dementia (510 respondents) distributed by Alzheimer’s Society staff and other networks in Autumn 2012 (referred to as the DFCsurvey) to explore the barriers that people face in their community, how they would like to be engaged in their local area, and the support they need to enable them to do so. Overall, the report aims to provide guidance to areas that are looking to become dementia-friendly, and to provide extra evidence for those already committed to becoming dementia-friendly. Evidence from people with dementia and their carers is collated alongside examples of projects that are making a difference for people with dementia. This information is used both to provide a definition of a dementia-friendly community, and to suggest 10 key areas of focus for communities to consider in working to become dementia friendly. These 10 key areas are: challenge stigma and build understanding; accessible community activities; acknowledge potential; ensure an early diagnosis; practical support to enable engagement in community life; community-based solutions; consistent and reliable travel options; easy to navigate environments; and respectful and responsive businesses and services. While there are some excellent examples of communities that are adapting themselves to the needs required by dementia, many people with dementia do not feel supported and a part of their local area; and are not able to take part in activities that they enjoyed before they developed the condition. Loneliness, feeling isolated and lack of confidence were identified as major barriers.

Results 31 - 33 of 33

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