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Results for 'community development'

Results 21 - 30 of 80

Commissioning community development for health: a concise handbook

CHANAN Gabriel, FISHER Brian
2018

A practical guide to help Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), sustainability and transformation partnerships (STPs) and local authorities to commission community development to support health and wellbeing. The guide looks at the role of community development in health and health policy, explains the main features of community development and the role community-based approaches can play in improving services. It includes a seven step framework for building community-led partnerships with local agencies and suggests key performance indicators that can be used to evaluate progress. It also provides a model contract for provision of the community development project and identifies the skill set for community development leaders and staff. The handbook is tailored to current policy in England, but the key principles have wider relevance.

People powered recovery: social action and complex needs. Findings from a call for evidence

TURNING POINT
2018

The UK All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on complex needs and dual diagnosis was established in 2007 in recognition of the fact that people seeking help often have a number of over-lapping needs including problems around access to housing, social care, unemployment services, mental health provision or substance misuse support. This report sets out the findings from a call for evidence on how social action can improve outcomes and develop more responsive services for people with complex needs or a dual diagnosis. Social action is about people coming together to tackle an issue, support others or improve their local area, by sharing their time and expertise through volunteering, peer-led groups and community projects. The report provides examples of how social action can support recovery, self-worth and confidence, boost employment prospects and skills, reduce stigma, better shape services to meet people’s needs, contribute to better health and wellbeing and save money. It also looks at how to overcome some of the challenges and barriers to developing social action focused around complex needs. These include resources, stigma, procedural issues, leadership, commissioning structures and demonstrating benefits.

Connect for a kinder tomorrow: new approaches to loneliness

KENNEDY Seema, REEVES Rachel
2017

This report, from the Jo Cox Commission on Loneliness, argues that loneliness is everybody’s business and calls for every individual to make better connections in order to tackle the problem. It provides suggestions for individuals, voluntary and community groups, employers, local and central government on what they can do to tackle loneliness on a day to day basis. It also makes reference to examples of good practice throughout. In order to build a less lonely nation, it recommends people to adopt a ‘five a day’ rule and have a minimum of five conversations each day and take a ‘Connect 4’ approach, where individuals have four meaningful relationships they can count on.

Community development in health: a literature review


2016

This literature review offers a brief background to the current state of play in the NHS and statutory services, and ideas that services more flexible, place-based services are likely to offer more effective and efficient outcomes. It then provides an overview of the nature of community development, its relationship to community health and to enhancing the responsiveness of commissioning of services. It brings together evidence which shows how communities can be supported to develop their own strengths and their own trajectories of development. It also examines the health benefits of community engagement, and identifies the limitations of some studies and where evidence that suggests poor outcomes or risks. It looks developing a business case, and what is already known of costs and benefits of community development. It finds that although it is difficult to express costs and benefits of community development in monetary terms, some effective techniques do exist. The evidence shows that community development helps to strengthen and increase social networks and therefore build up social capital. Evidence shows that they to contribute significantly to individual and to community health and resilience. Existing data also suggests that community development in health is cost-effective and provides good value for money. The review includes definitions of community development and key related concepts, including as asset-based approaches, co-production, social networks, social capital, and community capital.

Promoting asset based approaches for health and wellbeing: exploring a theory of change and challenges in evaluation

RIPPON Simon, SOUTH Jane
2017

This project explores two key areas that are critical for moving to a more systematised approach to asset based action for health. It builds on the report ‘Head, hand and heart’, from the Health Foundation, to explore further the develop a Theory of Change for asset based approaches aligned to an asset model for health and also looks at ways of evaluating and measuring the benefits and impact of asset based approaches. Drawing on the findings from site visits, interviews and a think piece event, this report presents a new Theory of Change for asset-based working. A rapid review of published and grey literature was also conducted to map and categorise evaluate approaches and measures used in asset-based programmes. The map of literature showed that a variety of methodologies and evaluation strategies are used in asset-based practice. The report summarises the approaches across the seven broad clusters of: Asset Based Community Development; Asset Mapping; Community-based evaluation; Conceptual frameworks for measurement; Resilience; Salutogenesis; and Other. The report suggests that a high level Theory of Change that incorporates an orientation phase provides an opportunity to set out the purpose and rationale of asset based activity. This can also enable measurement and evaluation to be better defined and managed, and help local actors in articulating the benefits (or not) of asset based approaches for health.

What works in community led support? Findings and lessons from local approaches and solutions for transforming adult social care (and health) services...

BROWN Helen, et al
2017

The first evaluation report of the Community Led Support (CLS) programme, which supported nine authorities across England, Wales and Scotland to develop and implement a new model of delivering community based care and support. The findings show what can be achieved when applying core principles associated with asset based approaches. CLS involves local authorities working collaboratively with their communities, partner organisations and staff to design a health and social care service that works for everyone. Its core principles include co-production; a focus on communities; preventing crises by enabling people to get support and advice when they need it; a culture based on trust and empowerment; and treating people as equals, and building on their strengths. The evaluation found evidence that CLS resulted in better experiences and outcomes for local people, improved access to services; greater efficiencies in services; reduced waiting times and lists; increased signposting and resolution through community services; improvement in staff morale; and a potential for cost savings. Sites achieved these changes by adopting a variety of approaches to implementing CLS - from implementing CLS across an entire authority area at the same time, to implementing in one innovation site and encouraging others to adopt aspects of the service. The report identifies six priority areas for action to further develop and embed community led support over the next 12-18 months.

The Kirklees Do Your Thing project

ALLEN Helen
2017

An evaluation of the Kirklees Do Your Thing project, delivered by Community Catalysts, to develop new innovative community-based activities for individuals with learning disabilities and/or autism. The two-year project, which employed a local catalyst, undertook a thorough community scoping exercise to identify organisations and people in Kirklees who might add value to the project; met people with a learning disability and/or autism interested in running an activity (called group leaders) and their supporters; supported group leaders to identify and connect with potential group members; identified community venues which could be used at no or little cost by group leaders to run their activities and formed strong working links with their managers; captured the journeys of the group leaders and showcased the outcomes of their work throughout the life of the project; established and strengthened a circle of formal and informal supports around each group leader to ensure the sustainability of their activity as the project came to end; and developed a set of ‘top tips’ for commissioners and other organisations keen to help other people with disabilities use their talents and interests to set up groups and make a contribution. The evaluation finds that with the right kind of help and support people with learning disabilities and/or autism will readily use their often-unappreciated gifts and talents to set up groups and activities that benefit other people. The project has also successfully challenged negative perceptions of people with learning disabilities and/or autism, helping professionals and families to recognise their strengths and gifts and the contribution they can make with the right kind of support. Key learning points include: it takes time to embed a project like this which brings radically new thinking into an area; some people prefer to work alone, and peer support groups may not work for everybody; establish the boundaries and be clear about the types of support that potential group leaders could or could not expect from the project; focus on the people who are really motivated; and work at people’s own pace.

Releasing Somerset's capacity to care: community micro-providers in Somerset. The impact and outcomes of the Community Catalysts project

COMMUNITY CATALYSTS
2017

An evaluation of the Community Catalysts project in Somerset. Community Catalysts is a social enterprise working across the UK to make sure that people who need care and support to live their lives can get help in ways, times and places that suit them, with real choice of attractive local options. In Somerset, the project aimed to increase the number of flexible, responsive, high quality local services and supports that can give people real choice and control over their care. As part of the project Community Catalysts has worked with partners to develop the Community Somerset Community Micro-enterprise Directory. The directory features 275 community-enterprises all of whom offer services linked to health, care or wellbeing. 223 offer help to older people to enable them to stay at home. 58% of these providers offer personal care services, including for people with more complex care needs. This care is often provided alongside home help, domestic and social support. 42% offer home help type services including support, companionship, domestic help, gardening, cleaning, trips out, transport. 3,500 hours of care a week are delivered by Community micro-enterprises in Somerset. Community Catalysts also undertook a survey of 45 families who have used both a micro-provider and a traditional domiciliary agency. The results showed that community micro-providers are able to deliver strong and valued outcomes for the people they support, and significantly outperform traditional domiciliary care delivery. The evaluation indicates that 32 community micro-enterprises in rural West Somerset are delivering £134,712 in annual savings. Projected across the 223 micro-enterprises supported by Community Catalysts in Somerset, the project delivers: £938,607 in annual savings; 56% of people supported use direct payments, showing £525,619 of direct and ongoing annual savings to the council.

Building bridges to a good life: a review of asset based, person centred approaches and people with learning disabilities in Scotland

McNEISH Di, SCOTT Sarah, WILLIAMS Jennie
2016

This review explores the potential to join up thinking on increased choice and control for people with learning disabilities and the principles of asset based working. Commissioned by the Scottish Commission for Learning Disability, it considers the efficacy of asset based approaches for people with learning disabilities, looks at evidence of the impact these approaches can have on people’s lives and also identifies examples of good practice in Scotland. The review draws on the results of a literature review; interviews with key informants involved in asset based working and learning disability services; and a mapping of projects using asset based principles with people with learning disabilities across Scotland. The results suggest that there are is reason why the focus of assets work cannot be broadened to include opportunities for people with learning disabilities. However it suggests that asset based approaches should be seen in the context of efforts to advance the personalisation and social integration agendas, and that if that they need to fit alongside services, support systems and initiatives. Examples included in the review illustrate how services can add to the assets of individuals and communities, provided they are willing and committed to relating to people and doing things differently. Factors identified that facilitate asset based approaches with people with learning disabilities, include: addressing wider inequalities and stigma; ensuring people with learning disabilities are active participants in place based community development; and tackling attitudinal barriers and established ways of doing things.

Due North: the report of the Inquiry on Health Equity for the North

INQUIRY PANEL ON HEALTH EQUITY FOR THE NORTH OF ENGLAND
2014

This inquiry report sets out a series of strategic and practical policy recommendations to address the social inequalities in health that exist both within the North of England, and between the North and the rest of England. The inquiry, commissioned by Public Health England, was led by an independent Review Panel of leading academics, policy makers and practitioners from the North of England. The report identifies the main causes of the of health inequalities within and between North and South to be differences in the: poverty, power and resources needed for health; exposure to health damaging environments, such as poorer living and working conditions and unemployment; chronic disease and disability; and differences in opportunities to enjoy positive health factors and protective conditions that help maintain health, such as good quality early years education; control over decisions that affect your life; social support and feeling part of the society. The report provides recommendations on what agencies and central government need to do to reduce these inequalities. They cover: tackling poverty and economic inequality; promoting healthy development in early childhood; sharing power over resources and increasing the influence that the public has on how resources are used to improve the determinants of health and developing the capacity of communities to participate in local decision-making; and strengthen the role of the health sector in promoting health equity.

Results 21 - 30 of 80

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
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