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Results for 'community groups'

Results 11 - 15 of 15

Friends on tap: the role of pubs at the heart of the community

DUNBAR Robin
2016

This report summarises a series of studies carried out on behalf of the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) on the role that community pubs play in people’s health, happiness and social cohesion. To set the scene, the paper first provides a brief overview of how people create their friendships. It then raises the problem of large scale social cohesion and provides some insights into how social cohesion has been engineered in the past. Finally, it presents the findings from a national poll of pub use and two studies of behaviour in pubs undertaken to assess the social value of small community pubs compared to large city centre pubs. The evidence suggests that while 40 per cent of people in the UK now typically socialise with friends in someone’s home, a third of the population prefer to do so in pubs, and regard pubs as a safe place to meet friends. People who said they have a ‘local’ or those who patronise small community pubs appear to have more close friends on whom they can depend for support, are more satisfied with their lives and feel more embedded in their local communities than those who said they do not have a local pub. The paper makes a number of recommendations for publicans, city planners and policy makers to ensure pubs play a role in people’s health, wellbeing and community cohesion.

Improving the health and wellbeing of communities

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION
2014

This paper is part of the ‘Tailor-made’ series, which aims to demonstrate the valuable contribution that the community sector makes to people’s lives and society as a whole. Specifically, this paper explores the significant role that community groups play in improving the health and wellbeing of communities. Key points include: the community sector is well placed to support wellness, rather than just treat illness through connecting organisations and supporting people with wider factors that affect health, including poverty, education and social isolation; the community sector has unique qualities that allow it to provide tailor-made support - they are trusted and understand the needs of their community, they can reach people that find it hard to access traditional support and they take a person-centred approach meaning they can support people’s multiple-needs; the community sector contributes significant social and economic value by improving physical and mental health, improving quality of life and reducing health inequalities. The paper also forms part of the full report 'Tailor-made: how community groups improve people’s lives.'

Proactive Primary Care

NHS Lewisham Clinical Commissioning Group

Lewisham CCG carried out a Proactive Primary Care (PPC) project in 2014, aiming to provide better support to people with long-term conditions (LTCs). A test group of people were called three times over three months by trained "telephoners" using motivational techniques. Calls explored with individuals their current health, their confidence in managing potential deterioration in their condition and health issues they wanted to address. Callers supported people by suggesting ways to tackle any issues and by putting them in touch with local third sector or statutory agencies.

Supporting influence on health and wellbeing boards: report from survey 2015

REGIONAL VOICES
2015

This report lays out the results from a survey for the voluntary and community sector (VCS), between December 2014 and January 2015, about how it is engaging with health and wellbeing boards. 119 people responded sharing their experiences from across England. While some good practice for how boards involve the VCS is emerging, some challenges remain. VCS appears to be under-utilised by local partners in health and care. Although there is considerable desire in the VCS to work with HWBs, only 22 per cent of respondents reported being able to link in with local Healthwatch or a sub-group of the HWB and around 30 per cent were able to raise issues with a VCS representative and only 9 per cent of respondents felt their organisation was linked with the work of the HWB (a reduction since the last survey). There is strong awareness that resources for local engagement are limited - with reduced capacity of local authority officers, commissioners (health and LA), the VCS and Healthwatch to work together. VCS organisations ask for clearer routes of engagement; timely involvement; and for information about developments to be shared from the board.

Community-led care and support: a new paradigm

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2015

Reports on the key messages from a roundtable discussion on community-led care. The event was hosted by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) and is one of a series of roundtable discussions exploring how to improve care and support at a time of growing demand, demographic change and financial constraint. The discussion aimed to identify, celebrate, support and learn from community-led activity and support and identify practical steps stakeholders can take to support community-led services. The report includes summaries of the presentations from those attending from the organisations: Skillnet Group Community Interest Company, Community Catalysts, Carers UK, Sheffield City Council, and Lloyds Bank Foundation. It also includes views from the round table. Key messages from the event are summarised in four key areas: the positive impact of community-led services; challenges and barriers; building and sustaining community-led services, and enabling community-led services to thrive. The roundtable identified the need to reduce the unnecessary barriers that small, local, user-led services often face in terms of regulations and in building up evidence to support commissioning and investment.

Results 11 - 15 of 15

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LAUGH research project New practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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