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Results for 'cost effectiveness'

Results 21 - 30 of 33

LGA Adult social care efficiency programme: the final report

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2014

This is the concluding report from the LGA Adult Social Care Efficiency (ASCE) programme. The programme was launched in 2011 in response to the significant cuts to council budgets and their impact on adult social care. The aim of the programme is to support councils to develop transformational approaches to making the efficiency savings required to meet the challenge of reduced funding. The report shares innovative and transformational examples of how councils are bringing together businesses, public sector partners and communities to develop lower-cost solutions to support the most vulnerable in our society. In particular, it outlines some key lessons around developing a new contract with citizens and communities, managing demand, transformation, commissioning, procurement and contract management, and integration. It looks at efficiency approaches in practice, with specific reference to assessment, advice and information, delivering preventative services, avoiding admissions and reducing costs of residential care, reducing costs in domiciliary care and transforming learning disability services. In addition, it considers local approaches to developing effective internal management, reshaping the service and working with partners, customers and suppliers.

An analysis of the economic impacts of the British Red Cross Support at home service

DIXON Josie, et al
2014

This independent economic evaluation of the British Red Cross Support at Home service focuses on four services which were found to improve outcomes in an earlier British Red Cross evaluation. The services all aim to help people to build their confidence and regain their independence during times of particular difficulty.Those evaluated were 'Next Steps', where volunteers provide home visits and monitor how people are coping following hospital discharge; 'Care in the Home' services delivered by staff and volunteers providing social visits, support and help with household tasks; and a Neighbourhood/Community service in Scotland which focused on linking people to existing services and volunteer-led services such as befriending. The final sample for this analysis consisted of a total of 52 people, the majority of who were over 65. Two outcomes were used in the economic analysis: an increased ability to manage daily activities and improved wellbeing. The evaluation identified cost savings that were related to a reduced need for formal/ informal care and general help around the home; a reduced risk of falls and malnutrition, particularly amongst those with unmet care needs; and, to a lesser degree, a reduced need for treatment of depressive symptoms. The total savings identified amounted to more than five times the cost of the service. The average cost of the intervention was £169 per person (based on the services and sample data in the Red Cross evaluation) and the identified savings came to £880 per person.

Investing to save: assessing the cost-effectiveness of telecare: summary report

CLIFFORD Paul, et al
2012

This summary report describes the findings of a project evaluating the potential cost savings arising from the use of telecare. Another aim was to develop a methodology that will support routine evaluation and comparison of the cost-effectiveness of local telecare implementations. Evaluation was made of the suitability of telecare for 50 clients for whom Overview Assessments had been completed by FACE Recording & Measuring Systems Ltd. Where telecare appeared suitable, the social care costs of meeting the client’s needs before and after provision of telecare were estimated. Estimates were also made of the total savings achievable by the deployment of telecare. Out of the 50 cases, 33 were identified as potentially benefitting from telecare. The average weekly cost of telecare was £6.25, compared to £167 for the average weekly care package for the sample pre-telecare. The results confirmed previous studies showing that very substantial savings are achievable through the widespread targeted use of telecare. Potential savings lie in the range of £3m to £7.8m for a typical council, or 7.4-19.4% of total older people’s social care budget.

Commissioning befriending: a guide for adult social care commissioners

ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES
2014

A guide developed to inform commissioners of adult social care about how befriending services are being delivered across the South West and how to effectively commissioning high quality befriending services. It describes what befriending is; the different ways it can be delivered; and the positive benefits it can have through improving health, well being and increasing independence. It also explains how people and communities can be involved in delivering and developing services through volunteering. Case study examples of current befriending practice are used throughout. The guide also draws upon materials and guidance produced by the Mentoring and Befriending Foundation (MBF) and feedback from commissioners and befriending providers through a series of consultations undertaken by the MBF.

Investing in recovery: making the business case for effective interventions for people with schizophrenia and psychosis

KNAPP Martin, et al
2014

This study provides economic evidence to support the case for investing in effective, recovery-focused services for people with schizophrenia and psychosis. Drawing on a wide range of data, it sets out the evidence for the cost-effectiveness for a range of interventions and service. Those discussed are: Early Detection (ED) services; Early Intervention (EI) teams; Individual Placement and Support (IPS); Family therapy; Criminal justice liaison and diversion; Physical health promotion, including health behaviours; Supported housing; Crisis Resolution and Home Treatment (CRHT) teams; Crisis houses; Peer support; Self-management; Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT); Anti-stigma and discrimination campaigns; Personal Budgets (PBs); and Welfare advice. For each intervention the report provides information on the context, the nature of the intervention, the evidence on effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, and the policy and practice implications. The report finds evidence to suggest that all of the interventions contribute to recovery outcomes, reduced costs and/or better value for money. Examples of the savings incurred through particular interventions are also included. The study was undertaken by a team from the Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU), at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), the Centre for Mental Health, and the Centre for the Economics of Mental and Physical Health (CEMPH) at King’s College London.

The effectiveness of local authority social services' occupational therapy for older people in Great Britain: a critical literature review

BONIFACE Gail, et al
2013

This literature review systematically selected, critically appraised, and thematically synthesized the post 2000 published and unpublished evidence on the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of occupational therapy interventions for older people in social care services. Identified themes established: the localized nature of social care services for older people; organizational and policy impacts on services, and factors influencing effectiveness and cost effectiveness. Although occupational therapists are increasingly involved in rehabilitation and reablement, there is a continuing focus on equipment and adaptations provision. A high level of service user satisfaction was identified, once timely occupational therapy services were received. Overall, occupational therapy in social care is perceived as effective in improving quality of life for older people and their carers, and cost effective in making savings for other social and healthcare services. However, the complex nature of social care services makes it difficult to disaggregate the effectiveness of occupational therapy from other services.

Technical guide: building a business case for prevention

SOCIAL FINANCE
2014

This guide sets out the issues that need to be considered when developing a business case to invest in preventive services and to ensure that any decision are based on robust and reliable data. The guide focuses on the following arguments: the importance of 'investing to save', arguing that prevention is cheaper in the long term; promotion of service innovation; placing the focus of commissioning on outcomes rather than outputs; and managing a shift in spending from acute to prevention to reduce demand over time. The guide outlines key four activities required to build a business case: understanding needs; understanding current costs; assessing possible interventions; and deciding how to measure the value and outcome of the interventions. It also provides a summary business case for prevention and using a Social Impact Bond (SBI) to finance a business case for prevention. An example case study of making a business case for prevention services in early years services in Greater Manchester is included.

‘The Billion Dollar Question’: embedding prevention in older people's services—Ten ‘High-Impact’ changes

ALLEN Kerry, GLASBY Jon
2013

With ageing populations, social changes and rising public expectations, many countries are exploring ways of developing a more preventative approach within their health and social care services. In England, this has become a growing priority over time—made even more significant by recent economic change and by the urgent need to reduce public sector spending. However, a key dilemma for policy makers and managers is the patchy nature of the evidence base—with a lack of certainty over how to reform services or prioritise spending in order to develop a more genuinely preventative approach. Against this background, this commentary reviews national and international evidence around ten policy measures and interventions, highlighting some of the most promising approaches as well as the fragmented and contested nature of the evidence base.

Homecare re-ablement prospective longitudinal study: final report

UNIVERSITY OF YORK. Social Policy Research Unit
2010

This report provides final findings of a study conducted with ten participating councils to investigate the benefits of homecare re-ablement. The study aimed to identify features of an effective and cost efficient services; maximise outcome and duration of benefits; and to understand and reduce the demands on other formal care, including other social services. The study comprised of three groups of councils: intervention sites which were enablement staff led; intervention sites with mixed staff teams; and comparison sites where service users had not undergone a phase of home care re-ablement. The previous interim study reflected on initial findings from the intervention sites. This report also adds findings from the comparison sites and long term impact from the follow up review stage. Main findings are discussed in the areas of assessment arrangements; discharge and onward referral arrangements; key features of re-ablement services; team skill mix; staff commitment, attitude, knowledge and skill; service users and carer views; and a strong vision of the service.

The cost effectiveness of homecare re-ablement: a discussion paper to explore the conclusions that can be drawn from the body of evidence

GERALD PILKINGTON ASSOCIATES
2011

The report ‘Homecare Re-ablement Prospective Longitudinal Study Final Report’ (Dec 2010) commissioned by the Department of Health’s Care Services Efficiency Delivery programme (CSED) has provided further insight and understanding about the nature and beneficial impacts of homecare re-ablement. However, some of the report content has resulted in a lack of clarity. The aim of this paper is to set out some of the background to the report and provide clarity on the learnings that can be gained with regard to the cost effectiveness of homecare re-ablement services. Contrary to impressions set out in various articles, the report does not indicate that homecare re-ablement as an approach has little financial benefits for a council. What it does illustrate is that councils should undertake a baseline exercise to establish an understanding of the local position and then to operationally performance manage their service to ensure that it is and remains cost effective whilst maximising the benefits of independence for as large a number of people as possible.

Results 21 - 30 of 33

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