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Results for 'environment'

Results 11 - 14 of 14

Researching age-friendly communities: stories from older people as co-investigators

BUFFEL Tine
2015

This guide evaluates the experience of involving older people in a research study that explored the age-friendliness of three areas of Manchester. It offers practical tips and critical reflections to help rethink how older people can be involved in research and social action to improve the physical and social environment of their neighbourhood. For the project a group 18 older residents were recruited and trained in designing interview questions, interviewing, data collection, and sharing the findings. The guide outlines the aims of the study, the methodology of the research and a summary of research activities undertaken. It then covers: what 'age-friendly means'; the co-researchers' motivations to participate in the study; the advantages and challenges of involving older residents; skills and knowledge acquired through the project; key findings; and suggested improvements to the age-friendliness of neighbourhoods. The guide includes contributions from older co-interviewers and representatives of community organisations who were involved in the project. The guide concludes by suggesting three principles for developing age-friendly neighbourhoods: that they should empower older people and enable social participation; they are a reminder about the rights of all citizens to full use of resources in their neighbourhood; and the importance of recognising both the social and physical dimensions which make up age-friendly communities.

Dementia friendly communities: guidance for councils

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, INNOVATIONS IN DEMENTIA
2015

This guidance looks at current best practice and learning in the creation of dementia friendly communities, how it fits within the broader policy landscape, and what actions councils can take, and are already taking in supporting people with dementia by creating local dementia friendly communities. It illustrates how simple changes to existing services, and awareness raising for those who come into day-to-day contact with people with dementia such as staff working in libraries or in leisure centres, can help people with dementia feel more confident and welcome in using council services. The guide looks at what a dementia friendly community is, why dementia is a key issue for councils and the role councils can play. It then presents a framework to help develop to plan, develop and assess the dementia friendliness of any community, organisation or process. The framework covers five domains: the voices of people with dementia and their supporters, the place, the people, resources, and networks. For each domain information is included on: the background to the issue, key actions that councils can take to make this happen, and examples or case studies of existing practice. The guide for those who have a role in leading, planning, commissioning and delivering public services; including health and wellbeing boards, and those responsible for health and social care services.

Going outside is essential for health and well-being

POLLOCK Annie
2012

There is strong evidence that people with dementia in care homes and hospital wards do not go outside and that, if there is outdoor space, it is not usually dementia friendly. This article reviews the evidence which shows that being outside is essential for mental and physical health and well-being. Vitamin D deficiency is due mainly to a lack of exposure to sunshine, and has been shown to be associated with falls and with a low mood and cognitive impairment. Physical exercise is also important for health and can reduce the risk of falls. Going outside and keeping active have been shown to: improve general health; reduce risk of depression; reduce cognitive decline; provide older people with a sense of freedom; improve sleeping patterns; improve appetite; reduce incontinence; and reduce aggressive behaviour. The article argues that the benefits of being outside, of being exposed to light, and taking part in exercise can lead to a reduction in the use of drugs. Savings in the cost of care can be used in the creation of therapeutic outdoor spaces. A second article will cover the key design features that can enable the use of outside space.

Transforming integrated care – using telecare as a catalyst for change

THOMPSON Frances
2012

This article discusses how to successfully mainstream telecare to transform service delivery and provide more preventative and personalised care for people of all ages and abilities. Based on experiences from the city of Wakefield, a metropolitan district of West Yorkshire, England, the article explores the use of technology and support systems, such as door sensors, smoke detectors or flood sensors, to assist vulnerable people by improving and improving well-being and maintaining independence, enabling individuals to live safely and securely at home for as long as possible. Alongside the management of adults and older people, telecare has also had a positive impact on the support of people with learning disabilities. The article concludes that to successfully integrate and mainstream telecare, there needs to be adequate training and assessment for all staff involved in the implementation in order to deliver a sustainable and deliverable telecare service. Overall, the cost efficiencies were crucial when considering the future of telecare and, with significant cost savings made over a relatively short period, the potential for future investments was a significant factor for the continuing delivery of services.

Results 11 - 14 of 14

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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