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Results for 'evaluation'

Results 11 - 20 of 174

Rapid systematic review of systematic reviews: what befriending, social support and low intensity psychosocial interventions, delivered remotely, are effective in reducing social isolation and loneliness among older adults? How do they work?

BOULTON Elisabeth, et al
2020

[version 1; peer review: 2 approved with reservations] Background: During the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic, millions of older adults are advised to avoid contact with those outside their household. ‘Social distancing’ has highlighted the need to minimise loneliness and isolation through the provision of remotely delivered befriending, social support and low intensity psychosocial interventions. We wanted to know what interventions are effective and how they work to help inform decisions about different approaches. Methods: This study followed a systematic ‘review of reviews’ approach and included systematic reviews focussed on the effectiveness or implementation of remote interventions to reduce levels of social isolation or loneliness in adults aged 50+. Searches of 11 databases were undertaken during April 2020 and eligible reviews were critically appraised using AMSTAR2. Narrative synthesis was used at a review and study level to develop a typology of intervention types and their effectiveness. Intervention Component Analysis (ICA) and Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) were used at a study level to explore the characteristics of successful interventions. Results: This study synthesised evidence from five systematic reviews and 18 primary studies. Remote befriending, social support and low intensity psychosocial interventions took the form of: (i) supported video-communication; (ii) online discussion groups and forums; (iii) telephone befriending; (iv) social networking sites; and (v) multi-tool interventions. The majority of studies utilised the first two approaches, and were generally regarded positively by older adults, although with mixed quantitative evidence around effectiveness. Focussing on processes and mechanisms, using ICA and QCA, this study found that the interventions that were most effective in improving social support: (i) enabled participants to speak freely and to form close relationships; (ii) ensured participants have shared experiences/characteristics; (iii) included some form of pastoral guidance. Conclusions: The findings highlight a set of intervention processes that should be incorporated into interventions, although they do not lead us to recommend particular modes of remote support.

Good Friends for All: age-friendly and inclusive volunteering grant programme evaluation

CENTRE FOR AGEING BETTER
2021

An evaluation of the Good Friends for All project, which works by matching together people self-referred or referred into the service with a volunteer “Good Friend” based on their needs and interests who can help with a range of issues. The Good Friends for All project builds on, and learns from, a similar scheme in Darlington and involvement in the Centre for Ageing Better’s original community research and review into age-friendly and inclusive volunteering. Good Friends for All appears to have a positive impact on the people supported and the volunteers themselves, helping improve social connections, health and well-being and generating a sense of purpose and value. The scheme has been enhanced through efforts to address barriers and embed age-friendly and inclusive volunteering principles and practice, such as trying to increase the support available to volunteers and make volunteering more flexible, so that it suits different circumstances. The project has highlighted the challenges of attracting new volunteers, although this has changed somewhat following the growth in volunteer numbers during the COVID-19 pandemic. The project has also highlighted the challenges of making changes to longstanding, pre-existing services and models (the project has adopted an existing Good Friends scheme established in a neighbouring area, while it has sought to adapt an existing, long-established befriending scheme in North Craven). Such situations may require a longer-term, gradual, cultural-change approach to embedding age-friendly and inclusive principles and practice in such instances where ingrained systems, processes and attitudes exist, and where working with new partners and establishing new relationships is required. The project is committed to continuing, developing and growing the scheme using other funding sources. It is also intending to continue promoting and embedding age-friendly and inclusive volunteering principles and practice within the scheme, the local Age UK partners and amongst other local organisations.

Social isolation and psychological distress among older adults related to COVID-19: a narrative review of remotely-delivered interventions and recommendations

GORENKO Julie A., et al
2021

The COVID-19 pandemic is associated with several short- and long-term negative impacts on the well-being of older adults. Physical distancing recommendations to reduce transmission of the SARS-CoV2-19 virus increase the risk of social isolation and loneliness, which are associated with negative outcomes including anxiety, depression, cognitive decline, and mortality. Taken together, social isolation and additional psychological impacts of the pandemic (e.g., worry, grief) underscore the importance of intervention efforts to older adults. This narrative review draws upon a wide range of evidence to provide a comprehensive overview of appropriate remotely-delivered interventions for older adults that target loneliness and psychological symptoms. These include interventions delivered by a range of individuals (i.e., community members to mental health professionals), and interventions that vary by implementation (e.g., self-guided therapy, remotely-delivered interventions via telephone or video call). Recommendations to overcome barriers to implementation and delivery are provided, with consideration given to the different living situations.

Late Spring: age-friendly and inclusive volunteering grant programme evaluation

CENTRE FOR AGEING BETTER
2021

An evaluation of Late Spring, an established bereavement support project for people in later life to provide mutual support, help people remember there is still ‘life to live’ and ‘look to the future without forgetting’. The support groups run twice a month in community venues and are designed to provide space for those aged 60+ who have been bereaved. They come together in a relaxed, warm, friendly and safe environment ‘with others who understand’, as they begin to face the reality of life without their loved one. Groups are facilitated by a trained community worker, often supported by volunteers. These groups have a mixture of both restorative and informative sessions based around tea, coffee, cake and the occasional meal and activity. People attend for between 12–24 months, though some remain with the group as volunteers. At the start of this grant programme there were 18 groups involving approximately 250 people across Oxfordshire. The Late Spring project highlights the challenges of integrating age-friendly and inclusive volunteering within an existing, successful project, ensuring that it enhances rather than undermines the service, while embedding age-friendly and inclusive volunteering principles and overcomes the barriers. This model has helped increase awareness and interest in volunteering amongst Late Springers, as well as increase their confidence to volunteer. Consequently, it has supported some Late Springers into helping more or rekindled interest in volunteering, resulting in positive experiences. In the process, the approach has enhanced the Late Spring project and helped improve its outcomes. This has been achieved by helping Late Springers recover and look to the future, increasing their confidence, reducing isolation, promoting being active and improving well-being.

Hastings Voluntary Action: age-friendly and inclusive volunteering grant programme evaluation

CENTRE FOR AGEING BETTER
2021

An evaluation of the Hastings Voluntary Action (HVA) project, which comprises three strands: a club, ‘Volunteering by the Sea’, for people that may be taking a break from volunteering or face barriers to participation; recruitment of volunteer champions to help inspire and support people into volunteering, as well as help design the model and steer the project; organisational health checks, promoted with local volunteer organisations to reduce barriers and embed age-friendly and inclusive volunteering principles and practice, as well as potentially providing a source of volunteering opportunities for volunteer club members. The Hastings Age-Friendly Volunteering project highlights the potential benefits of a multi-faceted approach. This model combines a sociable age-friendly volunteering club, predominantly co-located at a volunteering hub and community café to provide immediate volunteering opportunities, and volunteer champions to inspire, inform and support older people interested in volunteering. This model helps overcome barriers by applying age-friendly and inclusive volunteering principles, and support people into a variety of volunteering opportunities that suit their circumstances. The model has shown, where it has successfully engaged with people, that it can help increase social connections, reduce isolation and loneliness, and help improve self-esteem and confidence, both through engaging in the club itself and participating in subsequent volunteering opportunities. This in turn can potentially help improve emotional and physical well-being.

Sustain: Growing Connections: age-friendly and inclusive volunteering grant programme evaluation

CENTRE FOR AGEING BETTER
2021

An evaluation of Growing Connections, a project of Sustain, the alliance for better food and farming. The project was delivered through Sustain’s Capital Growth network of 2,700+ community gardens in London, using volunteers as part of the delivery model. The process sought to help the gardens involved in the project adopt age-friendly and inclusive volunteering by developing resources, such as a guide/toolkit, webpages, films and animation, to share best practice and encourage other community gardens, community-food and nature-based projects. The Sustain Growing Connections project and its model of sharing ideas, experience and expertise of volunteers and organisations through the flagship/buddy garden approach, combined with a community of practice, provided an effective platform to co-create, prototype and test resources relevant to age-friendly and inclusive volunteering. The project has also encouraged and supported the participating community gardens to put into practice and showcase approaches to age-friendly and inclusive volunteering. They have been given the opportunity to reflect, learn from each other, and implement changes to reduce age-friendly and inclusive volunteering barriers, embed the principles and make their gardens more age-friendly and inclusive. This in turn appears to be improving the volunteer experience and consequently increasing the diversity and amount of volunteer involvement and commitment. This has the potential to help community gardens attract and retain more diverse volunteers in the future and become more sustainable.

Kent Coast Volunteering: age-friendly and inclusive volunteering grant programme evaluation

CENTRE FOR AGEING BETTER
2021

An evaluation of Kent Coast Volunteering (KCV), a project that supports Kent’s coastal communities to improve their quality of life through the power of volunteering and social action. The project aimed to help isolated older people, at risk of being vulnerable due to their circumstances, who have been ‘supported’ by KCV’s community care navigation referral service or other partners, to become ‘supporters’ of other people. KCV sought to achieve this through a package of inspiration, confidence and skills building delivered in a neutral ‘third space’, and then supporting and matching people to volunteer opportunities through their existing volunteer outreach and brokerage service. The project demonstrates through testing, learning and iterating that an informal approach such as the social get togethers, which is not overt initially, but gradually introduces volunteering, can be effective in engaging people. This is initially through subtle introduction of fun (but purposeful and meaningful) micro-volunteering and exposure to volunteers and voluntary organisations. Subsequently, the approach becomes increasingly overt and promotes the benefits of local volunteering opportunities. This model helps generate positive outcomes such as increasing social connections, reducing isolation and loneliness, and building self-esteem and confidence. This in turn can potentially help improve emotional and physical well-being, helping people that were previously ‘supported’ to become more independent and resilient and potentially support others.

A collaborative, multi-sectoral approach to implementing a social prescribing initiative to alleviate social isolation and enhance well-being amongst older people

WILKINSON Emma Killbery, et al
2021

Purpose: In 2019, St Johns Winchester, a CQC-registered charity, launched the Hand in Hand (HiH) Service, a social prescribing (SP) initiative to alleviate social isolation/loneliness amongst older people via integration between primary care and the third sector. Arising from collaborative stakeholder reflection, this article explicates processes instigated to plan, implement and evaluate the HiH service which has been locally recognised as an exemplar of good practice. It aims to fill a gap in the literature which has hitherto lacked contextual description of the drivers, mechanisms and processes of SP schemes, leading to confusion over what constitutes SP and which models can work. Design/methodology/approach: The article defines the context of, drivers for and collaborative process followed to implement and evaluate HiH and reflects on challenges, facilitators and key points for transferable learning. Early evaluation findings are presented. Findings: Key features underpinning the success of the pilot phase were: having clear referral pathways, working collaboratively with health and voluntary sector partners, building relationships based on trust, adherence to high-quality standards and governance, a well-trained team of volunteers and access to up-to-date information source. There remains a disparity between the urgent need for rigorous evaluation data and the resources available to produce it. Originality/value: The article offers a novel contribution for those planning SP at the level of practice and policy and for the developing field of SP evaluation.

Ageing Better Isle of Wight: final evaluation report

HARFLETT Naomi
2020

Final evaluation report for Ageing Better Isle of Wight – a five-year Programme funded by the National Lottery Community Fund that aimed to make the Isle of Wight a great place to grow older, encourage better relations between generations, and tackle social isolation and loneliness. Over five years of delivery the AB IOW Programme has had a significant impact across a number of areas and generated substantial learning. 16,836 older people participated in 16 projects across all areas of the Island. These included: care navigators; community navigators; alternative transport; Alzheimer cafe; one-to-one creative sessions for people in residential care; care for carers; digital inclusion; education; men in shed; employment support; mental health peer support; good neighbour scheme; older-preneurs; an online directory of local events and services; singing groups. In total, 11 organisations were directly involved in delivery of the Programme and organisations across the voluntary, public and private sectors Island wide were affected by the impact of the work of the projects. Key areas of impact included: reducing social isolation – for an estimated two thirds of participants levels of social isolation were either reduced or maintained; improving wellbeing – there was a statistically significant increase in the mean wellbeing scores of national evaluation questionnaire respondents, and 50% of respondents participating in AB IOW projects experienced an improvement in wellbeing; value for money – analysis of the costs and the benefits of the projects found that in part due to good use of volunteers and existing community facilities, the projects delivered support, advice and interventions at a low unit cost per participant; becoming an Age Friendly Island – AB IOW has had a notable impact on the voluntary, public and private sectors on the IOW.

Evaluation of Ageing Better Isle of Wight

NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
2020

Final evaluation report for Ageing Better Isle of Wight – a five-year Programme funded by the National Lottery Community Fund that aimed to make the Isle of Wight a great place to grow older, encourage better relations between generations, and tackle social isolation and loneliness. Over five years of delivery the AB IOW Programme has had a significant impact across a number of areas and generated substantial learning. 16,836 older people participated in 16 projects across all areas of the Island. These included: care navigators; community navigators; alternative transport; Alzheimer cafe; one-to-one creative sessions for people in residential care; care for carers; digital inclusion; education; men in shed; employment support; mental health peer support; good neighbour scheme; older-preneurs; an online directory of local events and services; singing groups. In total, 11 organisations were directly involved in delivery of the Programme and organisations across the voluntary, public and private sectors Island wide were affected by the impact of the work of the projects. Key areas of impact included: reducing social isolation – for an estimated two thirds of participants levels of social isolation were either reduced or maintained; improving wellbeing – there was a statistically significant increase in the mean wellbeing scores of national evaluation questionnaire respondents, and 50% of respondents participating in AB IOW projects experienced an improvement in wellbeing; value for money – analysis of the costs and the benefits of the projects found that in part due to good use of volunteers and existing community facilities, the projects delivered support, advice and interventions at a low unit cost per participant; becoming an Age Friendly Island – AB IOW has had a notable impact on the voluntary, public and private sectors on the IOW.

Results 11 - 20 of 174

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H4All wellbeing service

H4All wellbeing service Practice example about how H4All Wellbeing Service is using the Patient Activation Measure (PAM) tool

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Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families
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