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Results for 'evaluation'

Results 21 - 30 of 91

Evaluation of the Homeshare pilots: final report

TRAVERSE, MACMILLAN Tarran, et al
2018

The final evaluation report of Homeshare pilots programme (HSP), which looks at what works to develop a sustainable Homeshare scheme. Homeshare schemes bring together older people who need support to stay in their homes, with young people who provide companionship and low level support in return for an affordable place to live. The evaluation, commissioned by SCIE and conducted by Traverse, identifies which approaches and activities work best, barriers to successful schemes, cost and benefits, and identifies factors that to be used by commissioners to assess bids for Homeshare schemes. It draws on qualitative interviews with pilot leads and staff, local authority stakeholders, referral agencies and with householders and homesharers from the first matches achieved in three HSP sites. It covers experiences of living in a Homeshare, operating a sustainable Homeshare scheme, referral and sustainability, and highlights broader learning for the social care and housing sectors. The results show how that Homeshare can reduce loneliness and improve wellbeing by offering companionship and facilitating inter-generational relationships, as well as addressing the lack of affordable housing options. The report concludes that the programme has been successful in supporting the development of Homeshare sites and provided learning in what works in supporting innovation within delivery of social and housing support.

The state of play: Arts and Older People programme

ARTS COUNCIL OF NORTHERN IRELAND
2018

Summary findings on the impact of the Arts and Older People Programme in Northern Ireland, which aims to provide older people with the opportunity to participate in arts activities that contribute to their health and wellbeing. The programme - which is jointly funded by ACNI, the Baring Foundation and the Public Health Agency - targets poverty, isolation and loneliness and provides opportunities for social interaction to help build confidence and resilience. The report provides details of the programme impact against the agreed performance indicators of: isolation and loneliness, social inclusion, poverty, health/dementia, and strengthening the voice of older people. Includes short case study examples of the initiatives.

Tackling loneliness: briefing

WHAT WORKS CENTRE FOR WELLBEING
2018

Based on a systematic review of evidence reviews, this briefing summarises the evidence on what works in alleviating loneliness in people aged 55 years and older. A total of 364 reviews were identified and 28 were included in the final review. The review found there is a need for greater clarity on the concept of loneliness and how it differs from social isolation, for both researchers and practitioners. Other key findings show that there is no one-size fits-all approach to alleviating loneliness in older population groups and that tailored approaches are more likely to reduce loneliness. A number of different approaches are being used to alleviate loneliness in older adults. These include: leisure activities; therapies; social and community interventions; educational approaches; befriending; and system-wide activities, such as changing the cultures of care. There was no evidence of approaches doing any harm, however there was a suggestion that some technology-based approaches are not suitable for everyone and could reinforce a sense of social isolation. Suggestions are made on how to improve the evidence-based on interventions for loneliness. The briefing also provides a case study of Community Webs, a project to reduce loneliness and social isolation of patients presenting to GP practices by mobilising community assets.

An overview of reviews: the effectiveness of interventions to address loneliness at all stages of the life-course

VICTOR Christina, et al
2018

This systematic review of reviews examines the effectiveness of interventions to alleviate loneliness. Searches retrieved 364 evidence reviews for screening. The final review provides a synthesis of 14 reviews and 14 reports identified from the grey literature, focused on assessing interventions to alleviate loneliness. The material included is International and from within the UK. All published and grey literature studies included focus on older people. Key findings show that there is no one-size fits-all approach to alleviating loneliness in older population groups and that tailored approaches are more likely to reduce loneliness. A number of different approaches are being used to alleviate loneliness in older adults. These include: leisure activities; therapies; social and community interventions; educational approaches; befriending; and system-wide activities, such as changing the cultures of care. There was no evidence of approaches doing any harm, however there was a suggestion that some technology-based approaches are not suitable for everyone and could reinforce a sense of social isolation. A wide variety of loneliness measures were used, and the concept of loneliness was not clearly defined, with the terms loneliness and social isolation often used interchangeably. The results from controlled study designs in community settings and care homes showed no effect of interventions on loneliness. However, the review notes that loneliness is seldom reported as a primary outcome in the published literature. The review makes a number of recommendations for policy.

'My nature' - an effective tool for residential care

BREWIN Wendy, ORR Noreen, GARSIDE Ruth
2018

Experiencing nature is increasingly recognised as having a positive impact on the health and wellbeing of older people living in care homes. This practice example of "My Nature" activities toolkit designed to solve the problem of access to green spaces, which can be difficult for older people with dementia in care homes. Sensory Trust and the University of Exeter collaborated on developing 'My Nature', an evidence based training toolkit to help care staff identify ways in which nature can not only play a role in a resident's care plan but also support them in their work. The toolkit consists of: evidence booklets, nature based activities and a wall chart. The toolkit was piloted and then evaluated to see how far it could achieve the health and wellbeing gains that access to nature can provide. Two care homes in Cornwall participated in the pilot. Activities demonstrated in the pilots include: nature palettes, nature mapping, painting by nature and a tea tasting party. Key findings from the evaluation: the activities succeeded in getting residents out into the gardens and also stimulated interaction, enjoyment and pleasure. For staff, the activities proved to be adaptable to different contexts, could be planned in advanced and person-centred. Challenges identified include: the activities did not appear to appeal to male residents and care home culture.

Community Webs: final evaluation report

BROWN C., et al
2018

Evaluation of Community Webs, a pilot project funded by Bristol Ageing Better (BAB) and Better Care Bristol (BCB), a social prescribing service which enables GP patients to access social activities and non-medical support services available in their local community. The evaluation of used both qualitative and quantitative methods to understand the process of delivery, short-term outcomes for clients and key costs linked to the project. The evaluation findings include client profiles and patterns of service use, patient experience of the linkworker service, GP and practice staff perceptions of the service, and links between service participation and client outcomes. The main reasons for practitioners making referrals were social isolation, low confidence and self-esteem and practical support needs (including welfare benefits, housing and form filling). The results suggest that Community Webs is beneficial for patients and GPs, in particular through its person-centred methods which have resulted in significant improvements to patients’ health and wellbeing. Patients have been provided with the right information to help them to access social, emotional and practical support, and have been able to make positive choices regarding their broader health and wellbeing needs. GP’s and practice staff have demonstrated trust in the voluntary and community sector, and in social prescribing in particular, by continuing to refer their patients into the service. The report also highlights that there is no ‘one size fits all’ in relation to social prescribing services and the value of exploring both the individual and community ‘assets’. Learning and recommendations are included.

Ageing Better: national evaluation short learning report: July 2018

CAMPBELL Diarmid, COX Korina
2018

Shares learning from the 14 partners of the Ageing Better programme, which aim to support people aged over 50 who are experiencing, or at risk of, social isolation and loneliness. The report draws on surveys of programme participants, visits to each of the 14 programme areas, and feedback from stakeholders from the partnerships. It reports that. to date, Ageing Better partnerships have worked with approximately 70,000 participants and 13,250 volunteers. The report also shows how Ageing Better, participants are, on average, less socially isolated and lonely, taking a more active role in their communities, have improved health and wellbeing, and are getting involved in delivering and designing projects. It also highlights benefits for volunteers and how Ageing Better is helping organisations improve partnership working and increasing skills, capacity and knowledge among participants helping to deliver and design programmes. Links to the partnership websites are also included.

Small but significant: the impact and cost benefits of handyperson services

ADAMS Sue
2018

An evaluation of the impacts and cost benefits of handyperson services carrying out small repairs and minor adaptations in the home for older people. It looks at how handyperson service fit into the current policy landscape summarises current evidence on their impact and cost effectiveness. It then provides an in depth evaluation of the of Preston Care and Repair handyperson service, with analysis of outputs, outcomes and examines the cost benefits in relation to falls prevention. The evaluation involved data analysis of jobs completed, a survey of users of the service and interviews with staff and service users. It reports that during the 9 month evaluation period 1,399 jobs were carried out in the homes of 697 older people, which exceeded outcome targets. Of people using the service, 46 percent were over 80 years and 72 percent were older people living alone. Older people also valued the service. Ninety-six percent of those surveyed said that the Preston Care and Repair handyperson service made them less worried about their home and 100 percent said that they would recommend the service to others. Analysis of the falls prevention impact on a small number of higher risk cases, found that for every £1 spent on the handyperson service the saving to health and care was £4.28. Other health and social care related outcomes included a risk reduction for hospital admission risk reduction and faster discharge to home, improved wellbeing, safer independent living, and reduced isolation. The report illustrates the impacts of handyperson services cover health, housing and social care aims and objectives. They also offer a cost effective solution with significant cost benefits and a high rate of return on investment, both financial and social.

Evaluation of Re:Connect and Time and Space peer mentoring projects: April 2014-August 2017

MacGREGOR Aisha, CAMERON Julie
2018

Outlines the main findings an evaluation of a mental health carers peer mentoring project, which delivered peer mentoring services across two sites: RE: Connect in Glasgow and Time and Space in Stirling and Clackmannanshire. The project aimed to enable mental health carers receiving peer mentoring to be better supported and have better mental health and wellbeing, and for peer mentors have improved skills and wellbeing. It involved training for peer mentors, an outreach programme to promote the project to professionals and the general public, and learning events to raise profile of mental health carers. The evaluation draws on interviews and surveys conducted with mentees, mentors, volunteers, staff members, and referral agencies. It looks at the successes and challenges experienced by the project. Case studies also provide an insight into the experience and impact of peer mentoring for both mentors and mentees. It reports that over three years, 109 individuals engaged with the project across both sites as mentors (n= 53), mentees (n=44), or volunteers (n=12). The training provided was particularly successful and helped to strengthen confidence and prepare individuals for the mentoring role and mentees also valued being supported by someone who had occupied a caring role. Challenges included the recruitment of mentees, despite direct advertising and outreach work. Overall, the project was successful, demonstrating the potential of the peer mentoring model for future provision.

Effect of horticultural therapy on wellbeing among dementia day care programme participants: a mixed-methods study

HALL Jodi, et al
2018

Fourteen people attending an adult day programme were recruited to a structured horticultural therapy programme which took place over 10 weeks. The effects were assessed using Dementia Care Mapping and questionnaires completed by family carers. High levels of wellbeing were observed while the participants were engaged in horticultural therapy, and these were sustained once the programme was completed. This study adds to the growing evidence on the benefits of horticultural therapy for people with dementia who have enjoyed gardening in the past.

Results 21 - 30 of 91

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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