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Results for 'evaluation'

Results 31 - 40 of 144

Single parents wellbeing: an evaluation of five Wellbeing Workshops in South Wales created and facilitated by Single Parents Wellbeing for single parents

FISHER Jackie, BURCHETT Nicole
2019

An evaluation of five Wellbeing Workshops to address the impact of social isolation on the mental health and wellbeing of single parents for single parents in Wales. The workshops brought single parents together to discuss issues that impact on their mental health and wellbeing and aimed to equip them with skills to support mental health and wellbeing and provide a social network to provide peer-led support beyond the life of the workshops. The workshops were delivered by Single Parents Wellbeing (SPW), a Community Interest Company that uses a peer-led approach to involves single parents in the planning and delivery of activities. A total of 48 out of the 58 single parents attending the workshops participated in the evaluation. Evaluation methods involved the collection of wellbeing information using the Warwick Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (WEMWBS), an online survey to collect participants’ views of the Wellbeing Workshops, and additional in-depth telephone interviews with participants. The qualitative findings from interviews cover single parents' feelings of isolation and loneliness, peer support, experience of stigma, difficulties with mental health and wellbeing, and experience of parenting alone. The evaluation found that the SPW was highly valued by the single parents that attended the Wellbeing Workshops. The Wellbeing Workshops also supported single parents to make positive changes in their lives that will improve mental health and wellbeing. The peer-led approach and combatting stigma underpins the way that the Wellbeing Workshops are delivered.

The intergenerational evaluation toolkit

JARROTT Shannon
2019

Intergenerational shared sites and intergenerational programmes that bring younger and older generations together can have many positive benefits. This Toolkit provides three resources to support programme providers and researchers to demonstrate the impact of intergenerational programming and the practices which achieve outcomes. The toolkit includes an Intergenerational Practice Evaluation tool to evaluate single intergenerational activities and the impact of programmes over time; a guide to planning an intergenerational evaluation; and a list of reliable outcome measures. The toolkit has been developed following 15 years of collaborative innovative practice and evaluation research.

Ageing Better in Camden: interim evaluation report

REMBISZEWSKI Perla, BIDEY Tim, VANSON Tim
2018

The first of two interim evaluation reports to explore the outcomes projects commissioned by Ageing Better in Camden (ABC), a six-year programme to address social isolation and loneliness in older people living in Camden. This report focuses on the progress of 8 projects, which include a Digital Inclusion project; North London Cares Intergenerational and Men’s Action projects; Community Action Projects, and LGBT+ Connect providing opportunities for older Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans people in Camden to socialise. Each project focused chapter includes details of participants, evidence of impact and individual case studies. The evaluation draws on qualitative data from conversations with project participants and project leads, as well as quantitative data from demographic surveys. Early findings suggest that the projects are achieving the anticipated positive impacts for older people. Positive impacts include: improved mental and physical well-being; new friendships and connections; improved confidence and independence; relationship building across communities and generations. The evaluation found that frontline staff played a key role in enabling participants to achieve positive impacts.

Effect of board game activities on cognitive function improvement among older adults in adult day care centers

CHING-TENG Yao
2019

Stimulating leisure activities are considered as possible protective factors against dementia and cognitive decline in older adults, particularly due to the enhancement of cognitive reserve. This study tested the effectiveness of board game activities improving the cognitive function of older adults in adult day care centres. This was a quasi‐experimental study. A purposive sampling strategy was used to select 82 subjects who were aged 65 and above with intact mental functions and currently residing in adult day care centres. 41 subjects who participated in a selection of 12 board game activities were assigned to the experimental group and 41 subjects who adhered to their ordinary activities were allocated to the control group. Structured questionnaires of the board game programs were used for data collection. The board game programs showed promising effects in the cognitive function of older adults living in adult day care centres. A possible beneficial effect of board game playing on the risk of dementia could be mediated by a less cognitive decline in older adults. Board game activities may benefit the cognitive function of older adults. Incorporating board game activities into social work care may help develop long‐term care into a more diverse, unique and innovative direction.

Social return on investment analysis of the health and wellbeing impacts of Wildlife Trust programmes

BAGNALL Anne-Marie, et al
2019

An analysis the social value of the Wildlife Trusts’ nature conservation projects, which offer outdoor volunteering opportunities and programmes that support people experiencing problems such as anxiety, stress or mild depression. The analysis, carried out by researchers at the Centre for Health Promotion Research at Leeds Beckett University, draws on the conclusions of three years of research on Wildlife Trusts’ projects. The results show that people participating in outdoor nature conservation activities felt better both emotionally and physically. The analysis calculates that for every £1 invested in general volunteering projects to tackle problems like physical inactivity or loneliness for people with average to high wellbeing, the social return on investment (SROI) was £8.50. For every £1 invested in targeted nature projects to tackle specialised health or social needs for people with low wellbeing at baseline, there was a £6.88 return. The report concludes that conservation activities should be encouraged as part of psychological wellbeing interventions.

Interventions to promote early discharge and avoid inappropriate hospital (re)admission: a systematic review

COFFEY Alice, et al
2019

Increasing pressure on limited healthcare resources has necessitated the development of measures promoting early discharge and avoiding inappropriate hospital (re)admission. This systematic review examines the evidence for interventions in acute hospitals including (i) hospital-patient discharge to home, community services or other settings, (ii) hospital discharge to another care setting, and (iii) reduction or prevention of inappropriate hospital (re)admissions. Academic electronic databases were searched from 2005 to 2018. In total, ninety-four eligible papers were included. Interventions were categorized into: (1) pre-discharge exclusively delivered in the acute care hospital, (2) pre- and post-discharge delivered by acute care hospital, (3) post-discharge delivered at home and (4) delivered only in a post-acute facility. Mixed results were found regarding the effectiveness of many types of interventions. Interventions exclusively delivered in the acute hospital pre-discharge and those involving education were most common but their effectiveness was limited in avoiding (re)admission. Successful pre- and post-discharge interventions focused on multidisciplinary approaches. Post-discharge interventions exclusively delivered at home reduced hospital stay and contributed to patient satisfaction. Existing systematic reviews on tele-health and long-term care interventions suggest insufficient evidence for admission avoidance. The most effective interventions to avoid inappropriate re-admission to hospital and promote early discharge included integrated systems between hospital and the community care, multidisciplinary service provision, individualization of services, discharge planning initiated in hospital and specialist follow-up.

Indoor nature interventions for health and wellbeing of older adults in residential settings: a systematic review

YEO Nicola L., et al
2019

Background and Objectives: Having contact with nature can be beneficial for health and wellbeing, but many older adults face barriers with getting outdoors. This study conducted a systematic review of quantitative studies on health and wellbeing impacts of indoor forms of nature (both real and simulated/artificial), for older adults in residential settings. Research Design and Methods: Search terms relating to older adults and indoor nature were run in 13 scientific databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, AgeLine, Environment Complete, AMED, PsychINFO, EMBASE, HMIC, PsychARTICLES, Global Health, Web of Knowledge, Dissertations and Theses Global, and ASSIA). This study also pursued grey literature, global clinical trials registries, and a range of supplementary methods. Results: Of 6,131 articles screened against eligibility criteria, 26 studies were accepted into the review, and were quality-appraised using the Effective Public Health Practice Project (EPHPP) tool. The participants were 930 adults aged over 60. Nature interventions and health/wellbeing outcomes were heterogeneous, which necessitated a narrative synthesis. The evidence base was generally weak, with 18 of 26 studies having a high risk of bias. However, several higher-quality studies found indoor gardening and horticulture programs were effective for cognition, psychological wellbeing, social outcomes, and life satisfaction. Discussion and Implications: There is inconsistent evidence that indoor nature exposures are beneficial for older care residents. This study suggests that successful interventions were, at least partly, facilitating social interaction, supporting feelings of autonomy/control, and promoting skill development, that is, factors not necessarily associated with nature per se. Higher-quality studies with improved reporting standards are needed to further elucidate these mechanisms.

Can lifelike baby dolls reduce symptoms of anxiety, agitation, or aggression for people with dementia in long-term care? Findings from a pilot randomised controlled trial

MOYLE Wendy, et al
2019

Objectives: To compare a lifelike baby doll intervention for reducing anxiety, agitation, and aggression in older people with dementia in long-term care (LTC), with usual facility care; and explore the perceptions of care staff about doll therapy. Method: Pilot, mixed-methods, parallel, randomised controlled trial, with follow-up semi-structured interviews. Thirty-five residents from five LTC facilities in Queensland, Australia were randomised to the lifelike baby doll intervention (three, 30-minute, individual, non-facilitated sessions per week) or usual care. Outcomes were changes in levels of anxiety, agitation, and aggression after the 3-week intervention, and short-term effects at week 1. Following intention-to-treat principles, repeated measure MANOVA was undertaken. Qualitative interviews involved five staff. Results: The doll intervention did not significantly reduce residents’ anxiety, agitation, or aggression when compared to usual care at weeks 3 (primary outcome) and 1 (secondary outcome). However, there was a significant group-by-time interaction for the outcome of pleasure – the doll group showed a greater increase in displays of pleasure at week 3 compared to baseline than usual care (F(1,31) = 4.400, p = 0.044; Cohen’s d = 0.74). Staff perceived benefits for residents included emotional comfort, a calming effect, and providing a purposeful activity. Perceived limitations were that doll therapy may only be suitable for some individuals, some of the time, and the potential for residents to care for the doll at the expense of their health. Conclusions: Doll therapy can provide some residents with enjoyment and purposeful engagement. Further research should focus on understanding the individual characteristics and circumstances in which residents most benefit.

Prevention: wrestling with new economic realities

KNAPP Martin
2013

Purpose : The purpose of this paper is to discuss the economic pressures on long-term care systems, and describe how an economic case might be made for better care, support and preventive strategies. Design/methodology/approach: Discussion of recent developments and research responses, with illustrations from previous studies. Findings: Economics evidence is highly relevant to decision makers in health, social care, and related systems. When resources are especially tight, economics evidence can sometimes persuade uncertain commissioners and others to adopt courses of action that improve the wellbeing of individuals, families, and communities. Originality/value: The paper uses long-established approaches in economic evaluation to discuss preventive and other strategies in today's challenging context.

Hospital to a Healthier Home: evaluation of a winter pressures pilot service

CARE AND REPAIR CYMRU
2019

An evaluation of the Hospital to a Healthier Home pilot scheme, delivered by Care and Repair, which ran from 11 hospitals between January and March 2019. The scheme aimed to support older people to be safely and more quickly discharged from hospitals to their homes and prevent them being re-admitted by making their homes safe and more accessible. This evaluation describes how the Hospital to a Health Home case worker service started, what type of interventions have been provided to patients and hospital staff, costs, benefits and the difference it has made to patient well-being, quicker safe discharges, and preventing re-admissions. The pilot involved dedicated Care and Repair case workers based at each hospital to facilitate practical improvements to a patient’s home and offer practical support on issues such as benefits entitlements. During the evaluation period: 626 patients were referred through Hospital to a Healthier Home service; 508 patients received work that helped quicker safe discharge. Based on a local assessment of bed day savings, the evaluation found that service costs are fully substantiated, and return £2.80 for every £1 invested (both revenue and capital). NHS frontline staff interviewed for the evaluation study also felt the service was of significant benefit and had the potential to deliver more.

Results 31 - 40 of 144

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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