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Results for 'evaluation'

Results 41 - 50 of 104

Small but significant: the impact and cost benefits of handyperson services

ADAMS Sue
2018

An evaluation of the impacts and cost benefits of handyperson services carrying out small repairs and minor adaptations in the home for older people. It looks at how handyperson service fit into the current policy landscape summarises current evidence on their impact and cost effectiveness. It then provides an in depth evaluation of the of Preston Care and Repair handyperson service, with analysis of outputs, outcomes and examines the cost benefits in relation to falls prevention. The evaluation involved data analysis of jobs completed, a survey of users of the service and interviews with staff and service users. It reports that during the 9 month evaluation period 1,399 jobs were carried out in the homes of 697 older people, which exceeded outcome targets. Of people using the service, 46 percent were over 80 years and 72 percent were older people living alone. Older people also valued the service. Ninety-six percent of those surveyed said that the Preston Care and Repair handyperson service made them less worried about their home and 100 percent said that they would recommend the service to others. Analysis of the falls prevention impact on a small number of higher risk cases, found that for every £1 spent on the handyperson service the saving to health and care was £4.28. Other health and social care related outcomes included a risk reduction for hospital admission risk reduction and faster discharge to home, improved wellbeing, safer independent living, and reduced isolation. The report illustrates the impacts of handyperson services cover health, housing and social care aims and objectives. They also offer a cost effective solution with significant cost benefits and a high rate of return on investment, both financial and social.

Evaluation of Re:Connect and Time and Space peer mentoring projects: April 2014-August 2017

MacGREGOR Aisha, CAMERON Julie
2018

Outlines the main findings an evaluation of a mental health carers peer mentoring project, which delivered peer mentoring services across two sites: RE: Connect in Glasgow and Time and Space in Stirling and Clackmannanshire. The project aimed to enable mental health carers receiving peer mentoring to be better supported and have better mental health and wellbeing, and for peer mentors have improved skills and wellbeing. It involved training for peer mentors, an outreach programme to promote the project to professionals and the general public, and learning events to raise profile of mental health carers. The evaluation draws on interviews and surveys conducted with mentees, mentors, volunteers, staff members, and referral agencies. It looks at the successes and challenges experienced by the project. Case studies also provide an insight into the experience and impact of peer mentoring for both mentors and mentees. It reports that over three years, 109 individuals engaged with the project across both sites as mentors (n= 53), mentees (n=44), or volunteers (n=12). The training provided was particularly successful and helped to strengthen confidence and prepare individuals for the mentoring role and mentees also valued being supported by someone who had occupied a caring role. Challenges included the recruitment of mentees, despite direct advertising and outreach work. Overall, the project was successful, demonstrating the potential of the peer mentoring model for future provision.

Effect of horticultural therapy on wellbeing among dementia day care programme participants: a mixed-methods study

HALL Jodi, et al
2018

Fourteen people attending an adult day programme were recruited to a structured horticultural therapy programme which took place over 10 weeks. The effects were assessed using Dementia Care Mapping and questionnaires completed by family carers. High levels of wellbeing were observed while the participants were engaged in horticultural therapy, and these were sustained once the programme was completed. This study adds to the growing evidence on the benefits of horticultural therapy for people with dementia who have enjoyed gardening in the past.

Using dolls for therapeutic purposes: A study on nursing home residents with severe dementia

CANTARELLA A., et al
2018

Objectives: Among the psychosocial interventions intended to reduce the behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), doll therapy (DT) is increasingly used in clinical practice. Few studies on DT have been based on empirical data obtained with an adequate procedure; however, none have assessed its efficacy using an active control group, and the scales used to assess changes in BPSD are usually unreliable. The aim of the present study was to measure the impact of DT on people with severe dementia with a reliable, commonly used scale for assessing their BPSD, and the related distress in formal caregivers. Effects of DT on the former's everyday abilities (i.e., eating behaviour) were also examined. Method: Twenty‐nine nursing home residents aged from 76 to 96 years old, with severe dementia (Alzheimer's or vascular dementia), took part in the experiment. They were randomly assigned to an experimental group that used dolls or an active control group that used hand warmers with sensory characteristics equivalent to the dolls. Benefits of DT on BPSD and related formal caregiver distress were examined with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. The effects of DT on eating behaviour were examined with the Eating Behavior Scale. Results: Only the DT group showed a reduction in BPSD scores and related caregiver distress. DT did not benefit eating behaviour, however. Conclusions: This study suggests that DT is a promising approach for reducing BPSD in people with dementia, supporting evidence emerging from previous anecdotal studies.

Imagine Arts: how the arts can transform care homes

BROOME Emma
2018

Imagine Arts was a three year programme funded by Arts Council England and the Baring Foundation involving a collaboration between the national home care provider Abbeyfield, Nottingham council, local arts organisations and Nottingham University. The aim was to enrich the lives of older people in care homes. Residents in 17 care homes took part in the programme, many of whom had dementia. This article discusses the outcomes of an independent evaluation that looked at the impact of Arts on care homes. Findings suggest that the delivery of high quality arts activities in care homes is feasible. Overall, residents had positive reflections and socialisation seemed to improve as the series of arts sessions progressed. The article also discusses the culture shift that is needed to embed the arts fully in residential care. The article also comments on the project legacy and provides some recommendations for care homes looking to introduce arts programmes.

Improving social support for older adults through technology: findings from the prism randomized controlled trial

CZAJA Sara J., et al
2018

Objectives: Information and communication technology holds promise in terms of providing support and reducing isolation among older adults. The impact of a specially designed computer system for older adults, the Personal Reminder Information and Social Management (PRISM) system is evaluated in this study. Design, Setting, and Participants: The trial was a multisite randomized field trial conducted at 3 sites. PRISM was compared to a Binder condition wherein participants received a notebook that contained paper content similar to that contained in PRISM. The sample included 300 older adults at risk for social isolation who lived independently in the community (Mage = 76.15 years). Primary outcome measures included indices of social isolation, social support, loneliness, and well-being. Secondary outcome measures included indices of computer proficiency and attitudes toward technology. Data were collected at baseline and at 6 and 12 months post-randomization. Results: The PRISM group reported significantly less loneliness and increased perceived social support and well-being at 6 months. There was a trend indicating a decline in social isolation. Group differences were not maintained at 12 months, but those in the PRISM condition still showed improvements from baseline. There was also an increase in computer self-efficacy, proficiency, and comfort with computers for PRISM participants at 6 and 12 months. Discussion: The findings suggest that access to technology applications such as PRISM may enhance social connectivity and reduce loneliness among older adults and has the potential to change attitudes toward technology and increase technology self-efficacy.

Efficacy of nature-based therapy for individuals with stress-related illnesses: randomised controlled trial

STIGSDOTTER Ulrika Karlsson, et al
2018

Background: Stress-related illnesses are a major threat to public health, and there is increasing demand for validated treatments. Aims: To test the efficacy of nature-based therapy (NBT) for patients with stress-related illnesses. Method: Randomised controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01849718) comparing Nacadia® NBT (NNBT) with the cognitive–behavioural therapy known as Specialised Treatment for Severe Bodily Distress Syndromes (STreSS). In total, 84 participants were randomly allocated to one of the two treatments. The primary outcome measure was the mean aggregate score on the Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWBI). Results: Both treatments resulted in a significant increase in the PGWBI (primary outcome) and a decrease in burnout (the Shirom–Melamed Burnout Questionnaire, secondary outcome), which were both sustained 12 months later. No significant difference in efficacy was found between NNBT and STreSS for primary outcome and secondary outcomes. Conclusions: The study showed no statistical evidence of a difference between NNBT and STreSS for treating patients with stress-related illnesses.

Yoga-based exercise improves health-related quality of life and mental well-being in older people: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials

TULLOCH Alice, et al
2018

Objective: health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and mental well-being are associated with healthy ageing. Physical activity positively impacts both HRQOL and mental well-being. Yoga is a physical activity that can be modified to suits the needs of older people and is growing in popularity. A systematic review was conducted with meta-analysis to determine the impact of yoga-based exercise on HRQOL and mental well-being in people aged 60+. Methods: searches were conducted for relevant trials in the following electronic databases; MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database, PsycINFO and the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) from inception to January 2017. Trials that evaluated the effect of physical yoga on HRQOL and/or on mental well-being in people aged 60+ years were included. Data on HRQOL and mental well-being were extracted. Standardised mean differences and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using random effects models. Methodological quality of trials was assessed using the PEDro scale. Results: twelve trials of high methodological quality (mean PEDro score 6.1), totalling 752 participants, were identified and provided data for the meta-analysis. Yoga produced a medium effect on HRQOL (Hedges’ g = 0.51, 95% CI 0.25–0.76, 12 trials) and a small effect on mental well-being (Hedges’ g = 0.38, 95% CI 0.15–0.62, 12 trials). Conclusion: yoga interventions resulted in small to moderate improvements in both HRQOL and mental well-being in people aged 60+ years. Further, research is needed to determine the optimal dose of yoga to maximise health impact.

Cognitive behavioural therapy for fear of falling and balance among older people: a systematic review and meta-analysis

LIU Tai-Wa, et al
2018

Background: fear of falling is prevalent among older people and associated with various health outcomes. A growing number of studies have examined the effects of interventions designed to reduce the fear of falling and improve balance among older people, yet our current understanding is restricted to physiological interventions. Psychological interventions such as cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) have not been reviewed and meta-analysed. Objective: to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis evaluating the effects of CBT on reducing fear of falling and enhancing balance in community-dwelling older people. Method: randomised controlled trials (RCTs) addressing fear of falling and balance were identified through searches of six electronic databases, concurrent registered clinical trials, forward citation and reference lists of three previous systematic reviews. Results: a total of six trials involving 1,626 participants were identified. Four studies used group-based interventions and two adopted individual intervention. Intervention period ranged from 4 to 20 weeks, and the number and duration of face-to-face contact varied. Core components of the CBT intervention included cognitive restructuring, personal goal setting and promotion of physical activities. The risk of bias was low across the included studies. Our analysis suggests that CBT interventions have significant immediate and retention effects up to 12 months on reducing fear of falling, and 6 months post-intervention effect on enhancing balance. Conclusions: CBT appears to be effective in reducing fear of falling and improving balance among older people. Future researches to investigate the use of CBT on reducing fear of falling and improving balance are warranted.

Reducing falls in older adults recently discharged from hospital: a systematic review and meta-analysis

NASERI Chiara, et al
2018

Background: older adults are known to have increased falls rates and functional decline following hospital discharge, with substantial economic healthcare costs. This systematic review aimed to synthesise the evidence for effective falls prevention interventions in older adults recently discharged from hospital. Methods: literature searches of six databases of quantitative studies conducted from 1990 to June 2017, reporting falls outcomes of falls prevention interventions for community-dwelling older adults discharged from hospital were included. Study quality was assessed using a standardised JBI critical appraisal tool (MAStARI) and data pooled using Rev-Man Review Manager® Results: sixteen studies (total sample size N = 3,290, from eight countries, mean age 77) comprising 12 interventions met inclusion criteria. Findings: home hazard modification interventions delivered to those with a previous falls history (1 study), was effective in reducing the number of falls (RR 0.63, 95%CI 0.43, 0.93, Low GRADE evidence). Home exercise interventions (3 studies) significantly increased the proportion of fallers (OR 1.74, 95%CI 1.17, 2.60, Moderate GRADE evidence), and did not significantly reduce falls rate (RR 1.27, 95%CI 0.99, 1.62, Very Low GRADE evidence) or falls injury rate (RR 1.16, 95%CI, 0.83,1.63, Low GRADE evidence). Nutritional supplementation for malnourished older adults (1 study) significantly reduced the proportion of fallers (HR 0.41, 95% CI 0.19, 0.86, Low GRADE evidence). Conclusion: the recommended falls prevention interventions for older adults recently discharged from hospital are to provide home hazard minimisation particularly if they have a recent previous falls history and consider nutritional supplementation if they are malnourished.

Results 41 - 50 of 104

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News

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Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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