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Results for 'integrated care'

Results 21 - 30 of 43

Community navigation in Brighton and Hove: evaluation of a social prescribing pilot

FARENDEN Clair, et al
2015

An evaluation of the community navigation service, a one-year social prescribing pilot. The model for the pilot was based on Age UK national templates, drawing from their vast knowledge and experience of delivering other similar services across the UK. Community navigators work in GP surgeries to assess patients non-medical support needs and help them access groups, services and activities that can broadly improve their health and wellbeing. The evaluation found that navigation is effective for patients, GP surgeries and volunteers. Patients feel listened to and understood by navigators, have increased access to the right services at the right time and are able to take the next steps towards improving their health and wellbeing. GPs continue to increase referrals, are satisfied with the quality of the service and are seeing positive benefits for their patients. Navigators value their volunteering role and suggest the training and support provided by the staff team enables them to carry it out effectively. 393 patients were referred across 16 surgeries during the first 12 months of the pilot and 741 referrals were made to groups, services and activities patients would not have otherwise accessed. The service attracted a highly experienced and skilled volunteer team to carry out the community navigator role. Most navigators have a previous or current career in healthcare, social services, teaching or counselling. The evaluation examines in detail: the impact on primary and secondary care; community navigation activities, outputs and outcomes; the social value; cost-benefit analysis; lessons, challenges and successes; and risk and opportunities. A set of key recommendations derived from the learning from the pilot are included.

People helping people: year two of the pioneer programme

NHS ENGLAND
2016

Describes the journey taken over the last year by the integrated care pioneers. The 25 pioneer sites are developing and testing new and different ways of joining up health and social care services across England, utilising the expertise of the voluntary and community sector, with the aim of improving care, quality and effectiveness of services being provided. The report describes the progress, challenges and lessons learnt across the pioneers. A number of key themes have emerged, including: population segmentation to determine people’s characteristics, their needs and care demands; using the experience of people; providing proactive care; providing integrated care services; supporting integration through using shared care records; using technology to support different access points; analysing impacts through data; and removing financial disincentives. Also included within the report are pioneers’ stories which describe the core elements of their care models and showcase how these are impacting real people.

Quick guide: improving hospital discharge into the care sector

et al, NHS ENGLAND
2015

This quick guide provides ideas and practical tips to commissioners and providers on how to improve hospital discharge for people with care home places or packages of care at home. The guide identifies areas for improvement, setting out checklist actions for local health economies to consider and examples of practical solutions and links to resources. The areas identified are: culture of collaboration between care sector, NHS and social care; improving communication; clarity on information sharing and information governance; difficulties with achieving the ‘home before lunch’ ambition; assessments undertaken in hospital leading to ‘deconditioning’ and longer, unnecessary hospital stays; delays to discharge due to awaiting for assessment; capacity of community-based services; and patient experience and involvement.

Putting older people first: our vision for the next five years. A whole system approach to meeting housing, health and wellbeing outcomes for our older populations in South West England

OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care
2015

This document by the South West Housing LIN leadership sets out a vision for a whole system approach to meeting housing, health and wellbeing outcomes for the older population in South West England over the next 5 years. It highlights: the aims and objectives of the group; specific issues facing the sector in the region; and examples of innovative practice and the group’s priorities over the next 5 years. These include: supporting initiatives which contribute to more integrated approaches to service design and delivery; promoting the development of new models of care based in and around the housing services, taking the opportunities these present to develop community based, local services and highlight the benefits of taking co-productive and inclusive approaches to service design; building an evidence base which shows how housing and housing related services contribute to the wider health and social care agenda, through prevention, as well as supporting the management of long term conditions; raising awareness around dementia, including how housing organisations can enable people living with dementia, and their carers, to live independently within the community; and raising awareness about the potential that technologies offer in supporting older people to live independently, and seeking to address the barriers to wider adoption.

Making it better together: a call to action on the future of health and wellbeing boards

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2015

This publication is a call to action to local commissioners, Government and national bodies to support health and wellbeing boards in bringing about a radical transformation in the health of local communities. It has been prepared by the Local Government Association (LGA) and NHS Clinical Commissioners (NHSCC) working jointly in consultation with members of health and wellbeing boards (HWBs) across the country. Among the essential characteristics of effective place-based boards this document highlights: shared leadership; a strategic approach; engaging with communities; and collaborative ways of working. It proposes: a national five-year funding settlement across health and care; freedom for HWBs to determine local priorities; development of a new payment system; enhanced information governance and data sharing; commitment to the principle of subsidiarity in commissioning decisions; a single national outcomes framework for health, public health and social care; and a national strategy for coordinated workforce planning and integrated workforce development across health, public health and social care.

Evaluation of Redcar and Cleveland Community Agents Project: outputs and outcomes summary report

WATSON Pat, SHUCKSMITH Janet
2015

The Community Agents Project, a programme jointly funded through health and adult social care services, is an innovative approach to meeting the social needs of the elderly and vulnerable population. Community agents act as a one-stop shop, signposting people to the appropriate service that meets their needs. This could be an organisation or voluntary group that can help with shopping, arrange transport to the GP surgery or hospital appointments, help to complete forms, offer encouragement to maintain a care plan, organise a befriender, accompany to a local social activity or signposting to other agencies. The project has received a total of 486 referrals across the borough of Redcar & Cleveland for the period September 2014-September 2015, generating positive outcomes in the following areas: maintaining independence; faster discharge from hospital; reducing admissions to hospital; reducing isolation; improved financial status; appropriate use of health and social services; cost saving; and increases in community capacity. The report estimates a social return on investment of £3.29 for every £1 invested in the Community Agents Project.

Creating a better care system: setting out key considerations for a reformed, sustainable health, wellbeing and care system of the future

ERNST AND YOUNG
2015

In this report, commissioned by the Local Government Association, a journey towards better health and care for individuals is set out; driven by local system leaders and supported by a more empowering and enabling system. The report has been developed through: a review of existing literature published by partners, charities and research organisations; four workshops with the LGA and partners to define the vision, understand the system barriers from a range of perspectives and describe the required changes; and further discussion with regional contacts and the Health Transformation Task Group to sense check that barriers and key considerations are locally relevant and reflect the experience in local areas. Section 1 sets out a vision for better care and support, arguing that a reformed system needs to deliver: better health and wellbeing more equally enjoyed; better choice and control for all; better quality care, tailored for each person; and better outcomes for each pound spent. Section 2 focuses on key barriers preventing the achievement of a reformed system. These include: creating dependency through the way treatment is provided; chronic underfunding of the system and a lack of capacity to transform; fragmented commissioning incentivising treatment over demand management; and national regulations that disempower local areas. Section 3 sets out four steps to better care, which are: put people in control; fund services adequately and in an aligned way; devolve power to join up care, support and wellbeing; and free the system from national constraints. The report concludes that collectively these steps will enable localities to address challenges, deliver a better system and ultimately drive better outcomes and greater sustainability for all.

Beyond fighting fires: the role of the fire and rescue service in improving the public's health

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2015

The case studies contained within this publication explore the activities of fire and rescue service to help the most vulnerable individuals and families in their communities. The trust placed in these services and the comprehensive access to the public that this provides means they have a unique ability to provide critical interventions, promote health messages and refer to appropriate services. These case studies include programmes spread across England, covering both rural and urban environments and with varying levels of deprivation and affluence. They show a range of ways in which the fire and rescue service supports prevention and contributes to tackling health inequalities by: supporting people with dementia; using firefighters to be ‘health champions’; tackling child obesity; reaching out to the most vulnerable; looking out for babies and toddlers; getting people active; working with others to save lives; and reducing falls in the home.

Away from the past and to a sustainable future: how the UK's health and social care systems can be reformed to better align with the needs of today’s society

SMITH Ian R., SMITH Stephen K.
2015

This paper explores the nature of the crisis affecting the health and social care systems, suggesting that they are badly misaligned with the needs of the society they serve, its ageing population, the prevalence of chronic ill health, rising demand and fall in funding. The paper diagnoses the reasons behind this misalignment and posits a solution: the introduction of integrated care organisations (ICOs) closely aligned to academic health and science centres (AHSCs). It argues that ICOs will remove the artificial and unhelpful boundaries between different parts of the healthcare service, and between health and social care. They will meet the needs of a population which is living longer and with more chronic conditions, move care away from hospitals, and promote prevention and parity of esteem between mental and physical health. Through alignment of these organisations with academic health and science centres, meanwhile, it will be possible to improve clinical outcomes and deliver precision medicine – and to sustain the UK’s position as one of the world leaders in genetic medicine. The paper also identifies the barriers to instituting such a change and explains how they can be overcome. It concludes with a step by step route map to a better care system, through ICOs and AHSCs.

Housing, prevention and early intervention at work: a summary of the evidence base

PORTEUS Jeremy
2011

This summary briefing explores the latest research and findings on the preventive aspects of both capital and revenue housing interventions in local care economies and the wider benefit realisation. In particular, it captures research that evidences the cost benefit of support for older and vulnerable adults with a long term condition in extra care housing as an alternative to residential care, preventing unnecessary hospital admissions and speeding up patient discharges. This evidence shows the care efficiencies that can be achieved and the potential for savings on the public purse. The paper concludes that that for prevention and early intervention to be effective a multi-dimensional approach is required, rewarding closer integration, offering incentives to encourage innovation and market development, and supporting investment in physical and social capital.

Results 21 - 30 of 43

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