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Results for 'integrated care'

Results 31 - 40 of 50

Putting older people first: our vision for the next five years. A whole system approach to meeting housing, health and wellbeing outcomes for our older populations in South West England

OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care
2015

This document by the South West Housing LIN leadership sets out a vision for a whole system approach to meeting housing, health and wellbeing outcomes for the older population in South West England over the next 5 years. It highlights: the aims and objectives of the group; specific issues facing the sector in the region; and examples of innovative practice and the group’s priorities over the next 5 years. These include: supporting initiatives which contribute to more integrated approaches to service design and delivery; promoting the development of new models of care based in and around the housing services, taking the opportunities these present to develop community based, local services and highlight the benefits of taking co-productive and inclusive approaches to service design; building an evidence base which shows how housing and housing related services contribute to the wider health and social care agenda, through prevention, as well as supporting the management of long term conditions; raising awareness around dementia, including how housing organisations can enable people living with dementia, and their carers, to live independently within the community; and raising awareness about the potential that technologies offer in supporting older people to live independently, and seeking to address the barriers to wider adoption.

Making it better together: a call to action on the future of health and wellbeing boards

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2015

This publication is a call to action to local commissioners, Government and national bodies to support health and wellbeing boards in bringing about a radical transformation in the health of local communities. It has been prepared by the Local Government Association (LGA) and NHS Clinical Commissioners (NHSCC) working jointly in consultation with members of health and wellbeing boards (HWBs) across the country. Among the essential characteristics of effective place-based boards this document highlights: shared leadership; a strategic approach; engaging with communities; and collaborative ways of working. It proposes: a national five-year funding settlement across health and care; freedom for HWBs to determine local priorities; development of a new payment system; enhanced information governance and data sharing; commitment to the principle of subsidiarity in commissioning decisions; a single national outcomes framework for health, public health and social care; and a national strategy for coordinated workforce planning and integrated workforce development across health, public health and social care.

Evaluation of Redcar and Cleveland Community Agents Project: outputs and outcomes summary report

WATSON Pat, SHUCKSMITH Janet
2015

The Community Agents Project, a programme jointly funded through health and adult social care services, is an innovative approach to meeting the social needs of the elderly and vulnerable population. Community agents act as a one-stop shop, signposting people to the appropriate service that meets their needs. This could be an organisation or voluntary group that can help with shopping, arrange transport to the GP surgery or hospital appointments, help to complete forms, offer encouragement to maintain a care plan, organise a befriender, accompany to a local social activity or signposting to other agencies. The project has received a total of 486 referrals across the borough of Redcar & Cleveland for the period September 2014-September 2015, generating positive outcomes in the following areas: maintaining independence; faster discharge from hospital; reducing admissions to hospital; reducing isolation; improved financial status; appropriate use of health and social services; cost saving; and increases in community capacity. The report estimates a social return on investment of £3.29 for every £1 invested in the Community Agents Project.

Creating a better care system: setting out key considerations for a reformed, sustainable health, wellbeing and care system of the future

ERNST AND YOUNG
2015

In this report, commissioned by the Local Government Association, a journey towards better health and care for individuals is set out; driven by local system leaders and supported by a more empowering and enabling system. The report has been developed through: a review of existing literature published by partners, charities and research organisations; four workshops with the LGA and partners to define the vision, understand the system barriers from a range of perspectives and describe the required changes; and further discussion with regional contacts and the Health Transformation Task Group to sense check that barriers and key considerations are locally relevant and reflect the experience in local areas. Section 1 sets out a vision for better care and support, arguing that a reformed system needs to deliver: better health and wellbeing more equally enjoyed; better choice and control for all; better quality care, tailored for each person; and better outcomes for each pound spent. Section 2 focuses on key barriers preventing the achievement of a reformed system. These include: creating dependency through the way treatment is provided; chronic underfunding of the system and a lack of capacity to transform; fragmented commissioning incentivising treatment over demand management; and national regulations that disempower local areas. Section 3 sets out four steps to better care, which are: put people in control; fund services adequately and in an aligned way; devolve power to join up care, support and wellbeing; and free the system from national constraints. The report concludes that collectively these steps will enable localities to address challenges, deliver a better system and ultimately drive better outcomes and greater sustainability for all.

Beyond fighting fires: the role of the fire and rescue service in improving the public's health

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2015

The case studies contained within this publication explore the activities of fire and rescue service to help the most vulnerable individuals and families in their communities. The trust placed in these services and the comprehensive access to the public that this provides means they have a unique ability to provide critical interventions, promote health messages and refer to appropriate services. These case studies include programmes spread across England, covering both rural and urban environments and with varying levels of deprivation and affluence. They show a range of ways in which the fire and rescue service supports prevention and contributes to tackling health inequalities by: supporting people with dementia; using firefighters to be ‘health champions’; tackling child obesity; reaching out to the most vulnerable; looking out for babies and toddlers; getting people active; working with others to save lives; and reducing falls in the home.

Away from the past and to a sustainable future: how the UK's health and social care systems can be reformed to better align with the needs of today’s society

SMITH Ian R., SMITH Stephen K.
2015

This paper explores the nature of the crisis affecting the health and social care systems, suggesting that they are badly misaligned with the needs of the society they serve, its ageing population, the prevalence of chronic ill health, rising demand and fall in funding. The paper diagnoses the reasons behind this misalignment and posits a solution: the introduction of integrated care organisations (ICOs) closely aligned to academic health and science centres (AHSCs). It argues that ICOs will remove the artificial and unhelpful boundaries between different parts of the healthcare service, and between health and social care. They will meet the needs of a population which is living longer and with more chronic conditions, move care away from hospitals, and promote prevention and parity of esteem between mental and physical health. Through alignment of these organisations with academic health and science centres, meanwhile, it will be possible to improve clinical outcomes and deliver precision medicine – and to sustain the UK’s position as one of the world leaders in genetic medicine. The paper also identifies the barriers to instituting such a change and explains how they can be overcome. It concludes with a step by step route map to a better care system, through ICOs and AHSCs.

Housing, prevention and early intervention at work: a summary of the evidence base

PORTEUS Jeremy
2011

This summary briefing explores the latest research and findings on the preventive aspects of both capital and revenue housing interventions in local care economies and the wider benefit realisation. In particular, it captures research that evidences the cost benefit of support for older and vulnerable adults with a long term condition in extra care housing as an alternative to residential care, preventing unnecessary hospital admissions and speeding up patient discharges. This evidence shows the care efficiencies that can be achieved and the potential for savings on the public purse. The paper concludes that that for prevention and early intervention to be effective a multi-dimensional approach is required, rewarding closer integration, offering incentives to encourage innovation and market development, and supporting investment in physical and social capital.

Unleashing the power of digital communications: revolutionising housing with care with life enhancing technologies

ROGAN Ali
2015

This paper looks at how technology can be used to help deliver good housing, care and support. It summarises the results from an online survey and workshop held with the South West Housing LIN (Learning and Improvement Network) leadership. It looks at what can be achieved when technology is implemented well and the looks at the challenges, barriers to adoption and ways to overcome the barriers. Four main barriers to the deployment of technology emerged from the workshop: culture; awareness; leadership, commissioning and procurement; and budgets. Suggestions put forward to help break down these barriers include: adopting a phased introduction of new ways of working; adopt a range of flexible funding options; good communication with stakeholders which involves them in the process early on; and using technology as one part of an integrated approach. Some case study examples are also presented as a bulleted list.

Knowledge exchange in health-care commissioning: case studies of the use of commercial, not-for-profit and public sector agencies, 2011-14

WYE Lesley, et al
2015

The aim of this study was to explore how commissioners obtained, modified and used information to inform their decisions, focusing in particular in the knowledge obtained from external organisations such as management consultancies, Public Health and commissioning support units. In eight case studies, researchers interviewed 92 external consultants and their clients, observed 25 meetings and training sessions, and analysed documents such as meeting minutes and reports. Data were analysed within each case study and then across all case studies. Commissioners used many types of information from multiple sources to try to build a cohesive, persuasive case. They obtained information through five channels: interpersonal relationships people placement (e.g. embedding external staff within client teams); governance (e.g. national directives); copy, adapt and paste (e.g. best practice guidance); and product deployment (e.g. software tools). Furthermore, commissioners constantly interpreted (and reinterpreted) the knowledge to fit local circumstances (contextualisation) and involved others in this refinement process (engagement). External organisations that drew on these multiple channels and facilitated contextualisation and engagement were more likely to meet clients’ expectations. Sometimes there was little impact on commissioning decisions because the work of external organisations targeted and benefited the commissioning decision-makers less than the health-care analysts. The long-standing split between health-care analysts and commissioners sometimes limited the impact of external organisations. The paper concludes that to capitalise on the expertise of external providers, wherever possible, contracts should include explicit skills development and knowledge transfer components.

All our futures: housing for ageing

HOUSING AND AGEING ALLIANCE
2015

This report summarises the key messages from the 2015 Housing and Ageing Summit where leading figures from the sectors came together to map out the actions required to address the critical issue of housing for an ageing population. It was agreed that: housing is fundamental to dignity and security in older age; it underpins health and wellbeing; it is the foundation of a sustainable NHS and social care system and needs to be an equal part of the integration agenda; at a time of unprecedented demographic change, housing, planning, health and social care must all systematically address population ageing; housing plays a critical role in the UK economy - older people live in a third of all homes and are the major driver of household growth.

Results 31 - 40 of 50

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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