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Results for 'integrated services'

Results 11 - 20 of 25

Mental health and housing

SAVAGE Jonny
2016

This study examines how different types of supported accommodation meet the needs of people with mental health problems. Supported accommodation covers a wide range of different types of housing, including intensive 24 hour support, hostel accommodation, and accommodation with only occasional social support or assistance provided. The document focuses on five approaches to providing supported accommodation, including: Care Support Plus; integrated support; housing support for people who have experienced homeless; complex needs; low-level step down accommodation; and later life. The report draws on the expertise of people living and working in these services across England, and presents their views of both building and service related issues. It sets out a number of recommendations, focusing on: quality; co-production; staff recruitment and training; policy informed practice; and resourced, appropriate accommodation.

Putting older people first: our vision for the next five years. A whole system approach to meeting housing, health and wellbeing outcomes for our older populations in South West England

OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care
2015

This document by the South West Housing LIN leadership sets out a vision for a whole system approach to meeting housing, health and wellbeing outcomes for the older population in South West England over the next 5 years. It highlights: the aims and objectives of the group; specific issues facing the sector in the region; and examples of innovative practice and the group’s priorities over the next 5 years. These include: supporting initiatives which contribute to more integrated approaches to service design and delivery; promoting the development of new models of care based in and around the housing services, taking the opportunities these present to develop community based, local services and highlight the benefits of taking co-productive and inclusive approaches to service design; building an evidence base which shows how housing and housing related services contribute to the wider health and social care agenda, through prevention, as well as supporting the management of long term conditions; raising awareness around dementia, including how housing organisations can enable people living with dementia, and their carers, to live independently within the community; and raising awareness about the potential that technologies offer in supporting older people to live independently, and seeking to address the barriers to wider adoption.

Collaboration readiness: why it matters, how to build it, and where to start

KIPPIN Henry, BILLIALD Sarah
2015

Examines the role of cross-sector collaboration in ensuring the sustainability of public services, focusing on building readiness to deliver collaborative services to the public. The report introduces a Collaboration Readiness Index, bringing together lessons from work with local, national and international public service agencies that are trying to work differently with others to manage future demand and improve social outcomes on the ground. The index comprises six categories, designed to capture and measure the readiness and capacity of: collaborative citizens; collaborative systems; collaborative services; collaborative places; collaborative markets; and collaborative behaviours. This conceptual framework is supported through a more granular focus on 12 collaborative indicators, developed from a practice base and illustrated through case studies. The indicators are: readiness to engage; service user influence; collaborative outcomes; system risk and resilience; cross-sector delivery; demand management capability; place-based insight; civic and community collaboration; collaborative commissioning; provider-side innovation; cross-sector leadership; and behaviour change.

Going round the houses: how can health and social housing sector professionals forge better links and what might the benefits be?

YAXLEY Njoki
2015

This booklet by the Clore Social Leadership Programme identifies key emerging trends that are impacting on social housing and health professionals. These are: a shift from health care provision in the hospital setting to the home; an increasing need for caseworkers to know more about navigating both health and social housing systems than their clients; the rise of people with long-term complex multi-faceted problems including physical and mental health issues; introspective performance management targets which make driving collaboration increasingly difficult on the frontline; and funding cuts impacting on both sectors – but an acute awareness that the client should still be centre stage. The paper suggests a need to widen the networks of frontline social housing professionals with health sector counterparts in order to increase efficiency and productivity in both sectors and provide people with better levels of care at home.

Beyond fighting fires: the role of the fire and rescue service in improving the public's health

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2015

The case studies contained within this publication explore the activities of fire and rescue service to help the most vulnerable individuals and families in their communities. The trust placed in these services and the comprehensive access to the public that this provides means they have a unique ability to provide critical interventions, promote health messages and refer to appropriate services. These case studies include programmes spread across England, covering both rural and urban environments and with varying levels of deprivation and affluence. They show a range of ways in which the fire and rescue service supports prevention and contributes to tackling health inequalities by: supporting people with dementia; using firefighters to be ‘health champions’; tackling child obesity; reaching out to the most vulnerable; looking out for babies and toddlers; getting people active; working with others to save lives; and reducing falls in the home.

Away from the past and to a sustainable future: how the UK's health and social care systems can be reformed to better align with the needs of today’s society

SMITH Ian R., SMITH Stephen K.
2015

This paper explores the nature of the crisis affecting the health and social care systems, suggesting that they are badly misaligned with the needs of the society they serve, its ageing population, the prevalence of chronic ill health, rising demand and fall in funding. The paper diagnoses the reasons behind this misalignment and posits a solution: the introduction of integrated care organisations (ICOs) closely aligned to academic health and science centres (AHSCs). It argues that ICOs will remove the artificial and unhelpful boundaries between different parts of the healthcare service, and between health and social care. They will meet the needs of a population which is living longer and with more chronic conditions, move care away from hospitals, and promote prevention and parity of esteem between mental and physical health. Through alignment of these organisations with academic health and science centres, meanwhile, it will be possible to improve clinical outcomes and deliver precision medicine – and to sustain the UK’s position as one of the world leaders in genetic medicine. The paper also identifies the barriers to instituting such a change and explains how they can be overcome. It concludes with a step by step route map to a better care system, through ICOs and AHSCs.

Is integration or fragmentation the starting point to improve prevention?

MILLER Robin
2014

The importance of health, social care and other sectors working together has been recognised for many decades by governments of all political persuasion. This is true within the current policy environment, in which integration has been proposed as the binding force to connect an increasingly diverse range of providers around individual patients and their families. Initiatives to promote integration are being introduced at all levels of the system, with a patient experience based narrative setting the standard against which success should be judged. This integration is being encouraged not only in respect of statutorily funded clinical, public health and social care services but also with other policy areas such as housing and leisure and other sectors (in particular the third sector). Despite this continued belief in policy that integration will lead to a more preventative focus, there is not a strong research base to support this view. However, accepting the limitations of the evidence base, this Policy Paper looks at five key lessons which can still be drawn for national policy makers with responsibility for promoting integration and prevention. These are to: start with what is fragmented; be clear what is meant (by integration); know what success looks like; understand the impact; and be wary of further change. The paper draws attention to key findings from reviews of integrated care; and notes that the interventions that have been most effective have been those with more preventative approaches. It concludes that patients and service users have to integrate support from statutory services, community resources and their personal networks to improve their quality of life and maintain their health and independence. To understand how and when to integrate, we first need to be clear what links are required and how they could operate in practice. That is why fragmentation rather than integration should be the starting point to achieve a prevention orientated health and social care system. This policy paper is based on a discussion paper which was commissioned by the Institute for Social Change at Manchester University as part of a series of Knowledge Exchange Trials workshops which brought together academics, policy makers and programme stakeholders to facilitate exchange of ideas, expertise and research.

All our futures: housing for ageing

HOUSING AND AGEING ALLIANCE
2015

This report summarises the key messages from the 2015 Housing and Ageing Summit where leading figures from the sectors came together to map out the actions required to address the critical issue of housing for an ageing population. It was agreed that: housing is fundamental to dignity and security in older age; it underpins health and wellbeing; it is the foundation of a sustainable NHS and social care system and needs to be an equal part of the integration agenda; at a time of unprecedented demographic change, housing, planning, health and social care must all systematically address population ageing; housing plays a critical role in the UK economy - older people live in a third of all homes and are the major driver of household growth.

Our support, our lives: joining up the public services used by disabled people

DAVIES Alissa
2015

Examines how health and social care integration can work better for working-age disabled people in the care system and applies key lessons and themes from integrated care and disabled people’s definitions of independent living to a wider range of public services. The report draws on desktop analysis of the impact of current integrated care initiatives on working-age disabled people, findings from interviews and focus groups with disabled adults, and Scope’s Better Care Project research. It argues that while the drivers behind integration have mostly been considered in the context of the ageing population the evidence strongly indicates that disabled adults should become a priority group for integrated care, alongside older people. It suggests that existing integrated care initiatives are not going far enough and considers how the Better Care Fund, Integrated Care Pioneers and Integrated Personal Commissioning can do more to improve outcomes for disabled adults. To help ensure the full potential of integrated care is full realised, the report identifies key action points on the following three fronts: incentives and rewards for independent living; a longer-term approach to risks and benefits; and making it clearer whether schemes apply to disabled adults. The report concludes that future plans for joined up support should apply the lessons from existing integrated care initiatives to the wider integrated support agenda, addressing all the barriers to independent living and encompassing education, work, volunteering, welfare and housing.

Local leadership, new approaches: how new ways of working are helping to improve the health of local communities

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2015

Examines how local authorities and health teams are working together to improve the health of local communities through prevention and early intervention. The report features seven case studies. Each one describes a particular programme or close partnership between a local authority and local public health or health care teams, often with the additional support of the voluntary sector. Each initiative focuses on a specific area and/or set of activities, including: integrating wellbeing; transforming the food culture in schools; helping people stay in their own homes; GPs linking people to other sources of support; healthy homes and housing conditions; promoting public health in schools; and active living.

Results 11 - 20 of 25

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News

Prevention in social care

Prevention in social care What it means, the policy context, role for commissioners and practitioners and the evidence base.

H4All wellbeing service

H4All wellbeing service Practice example about how H4All Wellbeing Service is using the Patient Activation Measure (PAM) tool

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families
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