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Results for 'intervention'

Results 41 - 50 of 207

Indoor nature interventions for health and wellbeing of older adults in residential settings: a systematic review

YEO Nicola L., et al
2019

Background and Objectives: Having contact with nature can be beneficial for health and wellbeing, but many older adults face barriers with getting outdoors. This study conducted a systematic review of quantitative studies on health and wellbeing impacts of indoor forms of nature (both real and simulated/artificial), for older adults in residential settings. Research Design and Methods: Search terms relating to older adults and indoor nature were run in 13 scientific databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, AgeLine, Environment Complete, AMED, PsychINFO, EMBASE, HMIC, PsychARTICLES, Global Health, Web of Knowledge, Dissertations and Theses Global, and ASSIA). This study also pursued grey literature, global clinical trials registries, and a range of supplementary methods. Results: Of 6,131 articles screened against eligibility criteria, 26 studies were accepted into the review, and were quality-appraised using the Effective Public Health Practice Project (EPHPP) tool. The participants were 930 adults aged over 60. Nature interventions and health/wellbeing outcomes were heterogeneous, which necessitated a narrative synthesis. The evidence base was generally weak, with 18 of 26 studies having a high risk of bias. However, several higher-quality studies found indoor gardening and horticulture programs were effective for cognition, psychological wellbeing, social outcomes, and life satisfaction. Discussion and Implications: There is inconsistent evidence that indoor nature exposures are beneficial for older care residents. This study suggests that successful interventions were, at least partly, facilitating social interaction, supporting feelings of autonomy/control, and promoting skill development, that is, factors not necessarily associated with nature per se. Higher-quality studies with improved reporting standards are needed to further elucidate these mechanisms.

Designing digital skills interventions for older people

PIERCY Laurence
2019

The internet and digital technologies can play a valuable role in supporting older and disabled people to improve health and wellbeing and gain easier access to health and care services. This report brings together recommendations for designing digital skills interventions for older people with care and support needs. It draws on insights from pathfinders in Sunderland and Thanet, which were funded by NHS Digital and supported by Good Things Foundation as part of the Widening Digital Participation programme. The pathfinders generated insights on small system-level changes that can embed digital inclusion in social care support and factors influencing digital inclusion within social housing schemes. The pilots also highlight the importance of engaging people at the right time when they can find relevance and value in technology. A list of useful resources are also included.

Can lifelike baby dolls reduce symptoms of anxiety, agitation, or aggression for people with dementia in long-term care? Findings from a pilot randomised controlled trial

MOYLE Wendy, et al
2019

Objectives: To compare a lifelike baby doll intervention for reducing anxiety, agitation, and aggression in older people with dementia in long-term care (LTC), with usual facility care; and explore the perceptions of care staff about doll therapy. Method: Pilot, mixed-methods, parallel, randomised controlled trial, with follow-up semi-structured interviews. Thirty-five residents from five LTC facilities in Queensland, Australia were randomised to the lifelike baby doll intervention (three, 30-minute, individual, non-facilitated sessions per week) or usual care. Outcomes were changes in levels of anxiety, agitation, and aggression after the 3-week intervention, and short-term effects at week 1. Following intention-to-treat principles, repeated measure MANOVA was undertaken. Qualitative interviews involved five staff. Results: The doll intervention did not significantly reduce residents’ anxiety, agitation, or aggression when compared to usual care at weeks 3 (primary outcome) and 1 (secondary outcome). However, there was a significant group-by-time interaction for the outcome of pleasure – the doll group showed a greater increase in displays of pleasure at week 3 compared to baseline than usual care (F(1,31) = 4.400, p = 0.044; Cohen’s d = 0.74). Staff perceived benefits for residents included emotional comfort, a calming effect, and providing a purposeful activity. Perceived limitations were that doll therapy may only be suitable for some individuals, some of the time, and the potential for residents to care for the doll at the expense of their health. Conclusions: Doll therapy can provide some residents with enjoyment and purposeful engagement. Further research should focus on understanding the individual characteristics and circumstances in which residents most benefit.

Loneliness and the aging population: how businesses and governments can address a looming crisis

PALMARINI Nicola, et al
2017

This report explores the growing problem of loneliness in older people, current interventions, and ideas for future solutions. It draws on insights from interviews with a range of experts from six countries, including insight from medical professionals, social workers, academic researchers, technologists. The report focuses on why it is important for organisations understand loneliness and ageing, the triggers for loneliness, and why loneliness is so difficult to alleviate. It also looks at what is being done to alleviate loneliness in the ageing population today and potential future solutions. The report shows that for older people, loneliness is an emerging risk factor that has implications for personal, economic, and societal well-being. It identifies three areas for developing future solutions to address loneliness: detecting loneliness earlier and intervening earlier; helping people feel more engaged with others, and helping people rebuild social capital. It also outlines suggested actions for providers, business and employers. Short case studies of initiatives are included.

Preventive social care: is it cost effective?

CURRY Natasha
2006

This paper attempts to pull together and review key pieces of evidence about the cost effectiveness of prevention. The findings, which reflect a paucity of quantified information about the effectiveness of preventive interventions, suggest that there is a strong financial case for reducing hospitalisation (particularly through falls) and for reducing the rate of institutionalisation by maintaining independence. Small-scale trials show that small interventions could prevent falls and reduce the rate of institutionalisation. However, establishing a direct causal relationship between such interventions and long-term financial savings has proved problematic although. There is a lack of consensus over the cost effectiveness of intermediate care although there is evidence that it is cost effective when targeting specific groups/illnesses/events such as stroke and falls. Evidence for secondary stroke prevention services is perhaps the strongest, and most widely quantified, body of research. There is some evidence that primary prevention strategies (such as smoking cessation and reduced salt intake) have potential to reduce the incidence of stroke. The paper makes a series of recommendations, calling for a greater focus on low-level interventions, particularly where there is qualitative evidence that they are valued by service users; implementation of promising interventions, even if not supported by robust evidence, accompanying by formal evaluation during roll-out; development of standard outcome measures of prevention; targeting resources to ensure greatest impact; and greater integration between health and social care services as a drive to shift services towards the preventive end of the spectrum.

Hospital to a Healthier Home: evaluation of a winter pressures pilot service

CARE AND REPAIR CYMRU
2019

An evaluation of the Hospital to a Healthier Home pilot scheme, delivered by Care and Repair, which ran from 11 hospitals between January and March 2019. The scheme aimed to support older people to be safely and more quickly discharged from hospitals to their homes and prevent them being re-admitted by making their homes safe and more accessible. This evaluation describes how the Hospital to a Health Home case worker service started, what type of interventions have been provided to patients and hospital staff, costs, benefits and the difference it has made to patient well-being, quicker safe discharges, and preventing re-admissions. The pilot involved dedicated Care and Repair case workers based at each hospital to facilitate practical improvements to a patient’s home and offer practical support on issues such as benefits entitlements. During the evaluation period: 626 patients were referred through Hospital to a Healthier Home service; 508 patients received work that helped quicker safe discharge. Based on a local assessment of bed day savings, the evaluation found that service costs are fully substantiated, and return £2.80 for every £1 invested (both revenue and capital). NHS frontline staff interviewed for the evaluation study also felt the service was of significant benefit and had the potential to deliver more.

Active ingredients: the Aesop planning and evaluation model for arts with a social purpose

AESOP, BOP Consulting
2018

This short paper outlines a logic model developed for the planning and evaluation of the Dance to Health project, with suggestions of how it can be used in practice. The project aimed to develop a better understanding of the ways in which arts interventions in health and social contexts actually work, and to improve the ways these are designed and their impacts measured. The Active Ingredients logic model, includes: Inputs - such as the specific arts practice, venues and health or social care setting; and Outputs - volume of arts sessions and number of beneficiaries. It also summarises a set of ‘Active Ingredients’ in participatory arts work, which are summarised under the headings of ‘Engaging and Imagining’. The model will be useful for those involved in the evaluation and planning of arts interventions, as well as policymakers interested in arts as interventions.

Men's Sheds: a conceptual exploration of the causal pathways for health and well‐being

KELLY Danielle, et al
2019

Although men have a lower life expectancy than women, and are more susceptible to illness, they have been found to be less likely to engage in health‐seeking behaviour. Men's Sheds, as a gendered intervention, has been identified as an effective way to engage men in meaningful activity and gain social support from others. However, links between sheds and health and well‐being are not well‐documented, and evidence is lacking of the potential causal pathways to health generation. This study aims to develop a plausible empirically based causal theory of how Men's Sheds influence the health and well‐being of their participants and to set out future research directions to test this theory. Drawing on a scoping review of academic, peer‐reviewed journal articles published between 1990 and 2018, potential causal linkages between shed activity and health and well‐being outcomes are synthesised into a logic model framework. Sixteen relevant peer‐reviewed journal were identified from the academic literature. The data from the articles are predominantly self‐reported, and characterised by small sample sizes and/ or low response rates. Further, information is lacking on the demographics of Men's Shed participants and the contexts in which they exist. Most notably, while there is some evidence on the potential mental health and social well‐being impacts of shed activities, physical health is less documented. The study shows that there is a lack of reliable and systematic evidence of the potential causal pathways between Men's Shed activities and health and well‐being outcomes. In order to address research gaps, further research is required to test and develop the proposed theory and logic model.

North London Cares and South London Cares evaluation: final report

HITCHIN John, PETIE Olivia, NORRLANDER Amanda
2019

An evaluation Love Your Neighbour and Social Clubs, two programmes to reduce loneliness, improve intergenerational relationships and create a greater sense of community. The programmes, which aimed to bring together people of different generations to spend time together, were delivered across the London based charities North London Cares and South London Cares as part of The Cares Family’s model. The Social clubs programme brings together groups of younger and older neighbours to get involved in activities and socialise; and Love Your Neighbour focuses on one-to-one friendships between older and younger neighbours. The evaluation examines the outcomes for young and older neighbours, the strengths and weaknesses of the model, and highlights the challenges of evaluating community-based models. The evaluation found that overall, The Cares Family model is contributing to positive outcomes in four areas: reduced loneliness and isolation, particularly for older neighbours; improved understanding across the generations; a sense of belonging; and an increased connection to self.

The Kinect Project: group motion-based gaming for people living with dementia

DOVE Erica, ASTELL Arelene
2019

Engaging in enjoyable activities is an essential part of well-being, but people with dementia can find participation increasingly difficult. Motion-based technologies can provide meaningful engagement in a wide range of activities, but for people with dementia to take advantage of these devices requires a good understanding of how best to select and present these activities to this population. The objective of this study was to explore the use of motion-based technology (Xbox Kinect) as a group activity for people with dementia who attend adult day programmes. This qualitative study took place in an adult day programme for older adults with age-related challenges. Participants (n = 23) were observed while playing a digital bowling game presented on Xbox Kinect one hour per week for a period of 20 weeks, to capture naturalistic data. Field notes generated through observations were transcribed and analysed to identify emerging themes. The findings revealed three predominant themes which illustrate the potential of motion-based technology as a group activity for people with dementia who attend adult day programmes: (a) the importance of having a trained trainer, (b) learning versus mastery and (c) playing ‘independently together’. People with dementia can learn to play games presented on motion-based technology and enjoy doing so. Furthermore, using the technology in a group setting fostered an encouraging and supportive environment which further contributed to the leisure experience. However, to be used most effectively, staff must be trained to set-up and interact with the technology, as well as introduce, teach and support people with dementia to use it.

Results 41 - 50 of 207

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
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