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Results for 'mental health'

Results 31 - 40 of 46

Prevention in Bexley

London Borough of Bexley

The London Borough of Bexley is currently supporting different groups of people using a prevention approach: promoting citizenship for adults with learning disabilities; following a community-based recovery model in mental health day services and providing an integrated reablement service to enable older people to regain their independence and stay in their homes for longer.

Our communities, our mental health: commissioning for better public mental health

MIND
2015

This guide provides a background to public mental health, examining what it is, prevention types and risk factors, why it should be invested in and how to target interventions most effectively. The document sets out a framework of principles and good practice for designing and commissioning public mental health programmes, which include: work in partnership; understand your community and who is at high-risk; monitor and evaluate impacts; commission interventions across the life course; and address both physical and mental health. A range of practical case studies are provided to help commission successful public mental health programmes in local areas.

Measuring mental wellbeing in children and young people

BRYANT Gillian, HEARD Heather, WATSON Jo
2015

This document outlines the importance of measuring mental wellbeing in children and young people. It is intended to provide guidance on the use of targeted, evidence driven intelligence and practical support to those wishing to develop local joint strategic needs assessments (JSNAs) and the evaluation of interventions which improve the mental wellbeing of children and young people. In particular, the briefing examines what children and young people’s mental wellbeing is, and why is it important; it describes some of the tools which are currently available to measure mental wellbeing and identify its determinants; it discusses risk and protective factors; and explains how using intelligence can improve children and young people’s outcomes. The technical appendix has measures to quantify mental wellbeing and its determinants, information on using the measures and links to examples of evidence based practice.

Prevention: a shared commitment: making the case for a Prevention Transformation Fund

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2015

This document identifies and collates key pieces of evidence about the cost effectiveness of prevention in order to make the case for greater investment in prevention interventions. The report recommends that the Government should introduce a Prevention Transformation Fund, worth at least £2 billion annually. This would enable some double running of new investment in preventative services alongside ‘business as usual’ in the current system, until savings can be realised and reinvested into the system – as part of wider local prevention strategies. Based on the analysis of an extensive range of intervention case studies that have provided a net cost benefit, the report suggests that investment in prevention could yield a net return of 90 per cent.

Collaborative research between Aston Research Centre for Healthy Ageing (ARCHA) and the ExtraCare Charitable Trust: the final report

HOLLAND Carol, et al
2015

Report presenting findings from a longitudinal study to evaluate whether the ExtraCare Charitable Trust housing approach provides positive outcomes for healthy ageing which also results in health and social care cost savings. For the study 162 volunteer new residents were assessed prior to moving into ExtraCare accommodation in the 14 locations on their health, illness, well-being and level of activity. They were then assessed on the same measures at 6, 12 and 18 months after entry. Residents were compared against 39 control participants. The main focuse was to measure health, illness, well-being, activity and personal perceptions .Qualitative data were also collected through focus groups, interviews, and case studies to gather residents views and perceptions. Statistical modelling was used to identify the most important factors in predicting outcome measures of cost. Key findings identified: significant saving for NHS budgets, with total NHS costs reducing by 38% over a 12-month period for residents in the sample; a reduction in the duration of unplanned hospital stays; potential savings in the cost of social care; improvements in residents who were designated as in a 'pre-frail' state on entry to ExtraCare housing; and improvements in residents psychological wellbeing, memory and social interaction.

Improving later life: vulnerability and resilience in older people

AGE UK
2015

A summary of the available evidence regarding the maintenance of resilience in older people, examining some of the factors and experiences that make older people more susceptible to the risk of adverse outcomes and exploring strategies to help build resilience in later life. The key topics covered are: social engagement; resources, including financial resources, housing and age-friendly neighbourhoods; health and disability; cognitive and mental health; and carers. The paper makes a number of recommendations, including: adopt a holistic view of all kinds of vulnerability in later life as the main focus rather concentrating on parts of the problem or parts of the body; make better use of the research evidence to identify problems earlier and to target resources; concentrate more on combating the effects of neighbourhood deprivation; work towards providing an age-friendly environment; facilitate home adaptations, aids and a better range of housing options; and root out ageism among professionals and society in general.

Occupational therapy and physical activity interventions to promote the mental health wellbeing of older people in primary care and residential care: evidence update March 2015

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND CARE EXCELLENCE
2015

Summarises selected new evidence published since the original literature search was conducted for the NICE guidance 16 Occupational therapy and physical activity interventions to promote the mental health wellbeing of older people in primary care and residential care (2008). A search was conducted for new evidence from 1 June 2011 to 28 July 2014 and a total of 8,973 pieces of evidence were initially identified. The 21 most relevant references underwent a critical appraisal process and then were reviewed by an Evidence Update Advisory Group, which advised on the final list of 6 items selected for the Evidence Update. The update provides detailed commentaries on the new evidence focussing on the following themes: occupational interventions, physical activity, walking schemes, and training. It also highlights evidence uncertainties identified.

Guidance for commissioning public mental health services

JOINT COMMISSIONING PANEL FOR MENTAL HEALTH
2013

The Joint Commissioning Panel for Mental Health (JCP-MH) is a new collaboration co-chaired by the Royal College of General Practitioners and the Royal College of Psychiatrists, which brings together leading organisations and individuals with an interest in commissioning for mental health and learning disabilities. Public mental health involves: an assessment of the risk factors for mental disorder, the protective factors for wellbeing, and the levels of mental disorder and wellbeing in the local population; the delivery of appropriate interventions to promote wellbeing, prevent mental disorder, and treat mental disorder early; and ensuring that people at ‘higher risk’ of mental disorder and poor wellbeing are proportionately prioritised in assessment and intervention delivery. This guide is about the commissioning of public mental health interventions to reduce the burden of mental disorder, enhance mental wellbeing, and support the delivery of a broad range of outcomes relating to health, education and employment. It is the second version of the public mental health guide: It has been revised and updated to include new sources of data and information.

Outcomes of the active at 60 community agent programme: research report

HATAMIAN Areenay, PEARMAIN Daniel, GOLDEN Sarah
2012

The Active at 60 Community Agents programme was a Department for Work and Pensions fund to encourage community groups and their volunteers to help people approaching and post retirement (particularly those at risk of social isolation and loneliness in later life) to stay or become active and positively engaged with society. It was launched in March 2011 and ran until December 2011. This evaluation of the programme included surveys and interviews with local funders, group leaders, community agents (volunteers whose role aimed to empower and support older people to become and/or stay active) and older people. The report describes the background and methodology of the study and presents the findings, covering the role of Community Agents, reaching and engaging older people, what groups did with the funding, what difference the programme made to older people who took part and wider benefits, the legacy of the programme, and the role of local funders and programme management. It also discusses how far the programme achieved its aims and sets out key lessons learned.

Mental health recovery is social

HOLTTUM Sue
2014

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to summarise two 2014 research papers that highlight the role of social interactions and the social world in recovery in the context of mental distress. Design/methodology/approach: The author summarise two papers: one is about two theories from social psychology that help us understand social identity – our sense of who we are. The other brings together and looks at the similarities and differences between ten different therapies that can be called resource-oriented – that is, they focus on people's strengths and resources rather than what is wrong with them. Findings: The paper on social identity gives a convincing case for incorporating teaching about social identity – and the social groups to which people belong – into the training of mental health professionals. The paper on resource-oriented therapies suggests that social relationships are a main component of all ten therapies examined. This second paper suggested a need for more research and theory relating to resource-oriented therapies. Social identity theory could help address this issue. Mental health services may be able to help people more by focusing on their established and desired social identities and group-belonging, and their strengths, than is usual. Originality/value: These two papers seem timely given the growing recognition of the role of social factors in the development and maintenance of mental distress. More attention to social factors in recovery could help make it more self-sustaining.

Results 31 - 40 of 46

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