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Results for 'older people'

Results 11 - 20 of 330

Effectiveness of multifactorial interventions in preventing falls among older adults in the community: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

LEE Seon Heui, YU Soyoung
2020

Background: Falls often cause unexpected injuries that older adults find difficult to recover from (e.g., hip and other major fractures, intracranial bleeding); therefore, fall prevention and interventions are of particular significance. Objectives: This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of multifactorial fall prevention interventions among community-dwelling older adults and compare subgroups that differed in terms of their degree of fall risk and the intensity and components of interventions. Methods: An exhaustive systematic literature search was undertaken using the following databases: Ovid-Medline, Ovid-Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Central). Two investigators independently extracted data and assessed the quality of the studies by examining the risk of bias. This study conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials that had been published up to March 31st, 2019, using Review Manager. Results: Of 1,328 studies, 45 articles were relevant to this study. In total, 29 studies included participants in the high-risk group, 3 in the frail group, and 13 in the healthy older adult group. Additionally, 28 and 17 studies used active and referral multifactorial interventions, respectively. Multifactorial interventions included the following components: exercise, education, environmental modification, medication, mobility aids, and vision and psychological management. Multifactorial interventions significantly reduced fall rates in the high-risk (risk ratio 0.66; 95% confidence interval 0.52–0.84) and healthy groups (risk ratio 0.72; 95% confidence interval 0.58–0.89), when compared to the control group. Active multifactorial interventions (risk ratio 0.64; 95% confidence interval 0.51–0.80) and those featuring exercise (risk ratio 0.66; 95% confidence interval 0.54–0.80) and environmental modification also showed significantly reduced fall rates (risk ratio 0.65; 95% confidence interval 0.54–0.79) compared to usual care. Multifactorial interventions had a significantly lower number of people who experienced falls during the study period compared to usual care in the healthy group (risk ratio 0.77; 95% confidence interval 0.62–0.95). Active multifactorial interventions (risk ratio 0.73; 95% confidence interval 0.60–0.89) and those featuring exercise (risk ratio 0.79; 95% confidence interval 0.66–0.95) and environmental modification (risk ratio 0.80; 95% confidence interval 0.68–0.95) had a significantly lower number of people who experienced falls compared to those receiving usual care. Conclusions: Active multifactorial interventions had positive effects on fall rates and the number of people experiencing falls. Thus, healthcare workers, including nurses, should be involved in planning fall prevention programs so that older adults can be provided with optimal care; multifactorial interventions that include exercise and environmental modification are particularly effective in reducing falls.

Effects of participating in community assets on quality of life and costs of care: longitudinal cohort study of older people in England

MUNFORD Luke Aaron, et al
2020

Objectives: Improving outcomes for older people with long-term conditions and multimorbidity is a priority. Current policy commits to substantial expansion of social prescribing to community assets, such as charity, voluntary or community groups. This study uses longitudinal data to add to the limited evidence on whether this is associated with better quality of life or lower costs of care. Design: Prospective 18-month cohort survey of self-reported participation in community assets and quality of life linked to administrative care records. Effects of starting and stopping participation estimated using double-robust estimation. Setting: Participation in community asset facilities. Costs of primary and secondary care. Participants 4377 older people with long-term conditions. Intervention Participation in community assets. Primary and secondary outcome measures Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), healthcare costs and social value estimated using net benefits. Results: Starting to participate in community assets was associated with a 0.017 (95% CI 0.002 to 0.032) gain in QALYs after 6 months, 0.030 (95% CI 0.005 to 0.054) after 12 months and 0.056 (95% CI 0.017 to 0.094) after 18 months. Cumulative effects on care costs were negative in each time period: £−96 (95% CI £−512 to £321) at 6 months; £−283 (95% CI £−926 to £359) at 12 months; and £−453 (95% CI £−1366 to £461) at 18 months. The net benefit of starting to participate was £1956 (95% CI £209 to £3703) per participant at 18 months. Stopping participation was associated with larger negative impacts of −0.102 (95% CI −0.173 to −0.031) QALYs and £1335.33 (95% CI £112.85 to £2557.81) higher costs after 18 months. Conclusions: Participation in community assets by older people with long-term conditions is associated with improved quality of life and reduced costs of care. Sustaining that participation is important because there are considerable health changes associated with stopping. The results support the inclusion of community assets as part of an integrated care model for older patients.

Hear and now: the impact of an intergenerational arts and health project on participant wellbeing

JENKINS Lindsay, FARRER Rachel, AUJLA Imogen
2020

This research explores the impact that an intergenerational arts and health project can have upon wellbeing, with a particular focus on the benefits that intergenerational practice can provide in relation to quality of life, affect, and social inclusion. It is based on Hear and Now, an award-winning, intergenerational community arts project developed by the Philharmonia Orchestra and Orchestras Live in Bedford, which brought together older adults living with dementia and young people. The study looked at the impact on the participant end users, and also the experiences of their carers and the artists and support staff who facilitated the project. Data were collected through observations of the workshops and focus groups. Researchers used the PERMA model of wellbeing to reflect on the impact of the project. The results found that participants reported: many positive emotions; a high level of engagement; the creation of positive relationships and new connections; that the project had meaning and that they felt of value; and an overall sense of achievement and accomplishment. The findings highlight the holistic impact of intergenerational arts and its ability to create a sense of belonging and purpose that unites different sectors of the community. The report also highlights key learning for future projects.

Evaluating Ageing Better Isle of Wight: participant journeys

NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
2020

This research report looks at how the Ageing Better Isle of Wight Programme, known as Age Friendly Island, is working to reduce isolation by exploring how older people access, participate and move between the projects. It draws on quantitative data of multiple project use, and through in-depth qualitative interviews with individuals who have used more than one project. The research found that for some people, likely to be the more isolated or less connected people, accessing the first project can be key. Once people access a project, they are opened up to both informal networks of other people participating in the group and also the more formal networks of project leads, Community Navigators or volunteers. Both groups are able to introduce them to new projects, services and organisations. The report identifies what can facilitate this process by enabling older people to: hear about a project; go to a project; stay at a project; and move to another project.

Engaging with the arts to improve health and wellbeing in social care settings

WELSH NHS CONFEDERATION
2020

This briefing, prepared for the Cross-Party Group on Arts and Health, provides innovative examples of arts-based activities which are being delivered in social care settings across Wales to improve people’s physical and mental wellbeing. They include Live Music Now which supports professional musicians to deliver evidence-based music workshops in care homes; cARTrefu, a project from Age Cymru to improve access to quality arts experiences for older people in residential care homes project; and Bangor University's Dementia and Imagination.

Perceptions of older people in Ireland and Australia about the use of technology to address falls prevention

MACKENZIE Lynette, CLIFFORD Amanda
2020

Falls are common events with serious consequences for older people. With an ageing population and increasing health-care costs, information and communication technologies (ICT) will have a potential role in future health-care delivery. However, research on technology acceptance in health care for older people is limited and its application to falls prevention is unknown. The aims of this study were to explore and describe the perceptions of community-dwelling Australian and Irish older people about their current use of technology, and the potential use of technology for falls prevention. Qualitative data were collected from three focus groups conducted in and around Limerick in Ireland, and three in the Sydney area, Australia. A total of 35 older people participated. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Four themes emerged from the data: (a) perceptions of vulnerability to falls, (b) preferences for exercise interventions, (c) participation in and ownership of technology, and (d) perceptions about applications of technology for falls prevention. As the use of technology is an instrumental activity of daily living, health professionals need to assess the capacity of older people to adopt these technologies, and provide falls prevention interventions to accommodate the technology skills of older people. Some participants were reluctant to embrace technology and barriers to the effective use of technology to assist in preventing falls may conflict with future health service trends.

Quality and cost-effectiveness in long-term care and dependency prevention: the English policy landscape. CEQUA report

MARCZAK Joanna, FERNANDEZ Jose-Luis, WITTENBERG Raphael
2017

This report summarises policy developments in England in relation to quality and cost-effectiveness and dependency prevention in long-term care. These policy aims focus on maximising the cost-effectiveness of the social care system, so that service users’ and carers’ quality of life is maximised within available resources. The report provides an overview of the long-term care system in England. It then reviews key recent policy developments in four areas: reducing dependency cost-effectively; strategies for maximising care coordination; supporting unpaid carers; and use of innovative care models, with a focus on technological solutions and personalisation. An appendix lists key features of the Care Act 2014 and the Better Care Fund relevant to prevention.

Psychological benefits of attending the theatre associated with positive affect and well-being for subscribers over age 60

MEEKS Suzanne, VANDENBROUCKE Russell J., SHRYOCK S. Kelly
2020

Objectives: Although late adulthood may be a time of greater well-being, optimal aging still characterizes a minority of older adults. Understanding how individuals achieve well-being across adulthood is important for intervention and social policy. This study focused on how attending live theatre might enhance the well-being of a sample of 53 season ticket holders aged 60 and older. Based on a previously tested conceptual framework, we hypothesized that post-performance reports of social-cognitive experience while at the play would predict post-performance positive affect, which in turn would predict well-being. Method: The sample was a subset of volunteers from a large survey study of theatre ticket purchasers. They completed baseline and two-year follow-up measures of well-being, and questionnaires immediately after attending seven plays across two seasons: measures of social engagement, belonging, flow, positive affect, and their reactions to the plays. Results: This study found that sense of belonging, social engagement, and flow were associated with positive affect after performances, as hypothesized. This study also found that the cumulative positive affect experienced after plays in the two seasons predicted change in well-being between baseline and follow-up. Conclusion: The findings suggest that attending performances is a combined social, cognitive, and affective experience that transcends entertainment. Future research might investigate whether the psychological benefit model assessed in this study will generalize to other leisure activities that create similar engagement. The findings have implications for individuals seeking to promote their own well-being, and, possibly more importantly, for policies that support enriching cultural opportunities, particularly in the arts.

The contribution of community singing groups to the well-being of older people: participant perspectives from the United Kingdom

SKINGLEY Ann, MARTIN Anne, CLIFT Stephen
2016

Current evidence suggests that participatory arts activities, and particularly group singing, may contribute to the well-being of older people. However, there is currently a paucity of prospective research from the participant perspective. This qualitative study nested within a randomized controlled trial aimed to assess participants’ perspectives of the acceptability and effect on health and well-being of a community singing program for older people. Volunteers recruited to the intervention arm (n = 131) were invited to write comments on their experiences over three data collection points of a 14-week singing program. A subsample (n = 19) participated in a retrospective semi-structured interview. Data were subjected to content and thematic analysis. Comments and interviews from 128 individuals suggested that the singing groups led to specific, incremental benefits to physical, psychological, social, and community well-being. Benefits tended to tail off after the program ended. Suggestions were made for the future running of such groups.

Impact of community care in enabling older people with complex needs to remain at home

RYAN Assumpta Ann, et al
2009

Aim. This aim of the study was to explore the impact of community care in enabling older people with complex needs to remain at home. Background. Changing demographic trends and successive government policies have led to an increase in the number of older people with complex needs residing in the community. Design. A qualitative approach using semi‐structured interviews was used to collect data from older people (n=17) and carers (n=14). Method. Social workers were asked to identify community dwelling older people (65+years) with multiple needs requiring interventions from a range of health and social care practitioners. Results. Community care enabled older people with complex needs who would otherwise have required residential or nursing home care to remain in their own homes. This was the expressed wish of both the older people and carers interviewed. Conclusions. The provision of high‐quality community care for older people is a globally significant challenge and one that requires creative solutions, both at a local and strategic level. Relevance to clinical practice. Nurses and other health and social care professionals need to understand the significance of ‘home’ for older people and take steps to ensure that additional and appropriate resources are targeted towards community care.

Results 11 - 20 of 330

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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