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Results for 'older people'

Results 11 - 20 of 147

A summary of Age UK's Index of Wellbeing in Later Life

GREEN Marcus, et al
2017

The Wellbeing in Later Life Index, developed by Age UK and the University of Southampton, provides a measure to assess the wellbeing of older people in the UK. The measure looked at wellbeing across 40 indicators covering five key areas – social, personal (living arrangements, thinking skills, family status), health, financial and environmental. This report summarises the work carried out to develop the index and presents results of an analysis of data from 15,000 people aged 60. It provides a picture of older people’s wellbeing across the population and factors that contributed to people having the highest and lowest wellbeing scores. The analysis found that a range of factors under each of the key areas play a part in contributing to a person’s overall sense of wellbeing in later life. It also identified a large gap between older people with the highest and lowest wellbeing. The results identified the importance of being engaged in the world around you, whether through social or creative or physical activities or belonging to a community group. Other domains also played a supporting role, as adequate income, good health, good social network, and access to local facilities make it easier to participate in society. Those in the lowest wellbeing group were more likely to report being on means-tested benefits, having poor health and low satisfaction with local services.

The social value of sheltered housing: briefing paper

WOOD Claudia
2017

Drawing on the findings from a review of evidence on the impact of sheltered housing for older people, this briefing paper provides estimates of the cost savings sheltered housing can achieve for health and social care. The paper gives a conservative estimate of a social value saving made by sheltered housing of nearly half a billion pounds. This figure takes into account costs saved through a reduction in the number of falls by older people, the time spent in hospital, combating loneliness, as well as fewer unnecessary call-outs to emergency services. The paper was commissioned to help Anchor, Hanover and Housing & Care 21 consider the future of sheltered housing.

Ways to Wellbeing

York Council for Voluntary Service

Ways to Wellbeing York is a social prescribing service which aims to improve health and wellbeing through working with people referred by GPs to identify their needs and identify local services offering non-medical interventions which may be able to help. The pilot which started in 2016 offers a whole system approach to wellbeing, enabling people attending their GP to be referred to a range of support providing by over 40 voluntary and community services in the city. The service is hosted by York CVS and funded by the City Council and currently offers access to social prescription referrals through four surgeries in York based in areas of greater deprivation. The longer term aim if funding is secured is to provide a city-wide service with a target of 1,000 referrals.

Herts Independent Living Service

Hertfordshire Independent Living Service

Hertfordshire Independent Living Service (HILS) was established with support from Hertfordshire County Council in 2007 to provide a meals on wheels service. HILS has developed over the last ten years to provide a range of caring services to support vulnerable and older people to live happily, healthily, and independently at home. HILS supports local statutory health and social care partners by offering much-needed services to some of the most vulnerable living independently in Hertfordshire, which are easily accessed by professionals through established referral processes.

The state of Shared Lives in England: report 2017

SHARED LIVES PLUS
2017

This report draws a survey of Shared Lives schemes in England to provide an analysis of services across England for the period 2015/16. The report provides figures on the numbers of people who use Shared Lives services, the type of arrangements they live in (live-in, short break and day support), the regional breakdown of services, the number and characteristics of carers, and staffing levels. The report finds that the Shared Lives sector has grown by 5 per cent over the past year, with approximately 11880 people being supported in Shared Lives arrangements. People with learning disabilities remained the primary users of the service, making up 71 percent of all users. This is despite a small reduction in the number of people with learning disabilities accessing the service in the previous year. The next largest group getting help from Shared Lives were people with mental health problems, who made up 8 per cent of users. Short case studies are included to illustrate the benefits of Shared Lives schemes. It ends with key learning from the past year and identifies some of the key factors and barriers to the successful expansion of Shared Lives.

Dance to Health: evaluation of the pilot programme

AESOP
2017

Outlines the results of Aesop's falls prevention dance programme for older people, Dance to Health. This arts based intervention address older people's falls and problems with some current falls prevention exercise programmes, by incorporating evidence-based exercise programmes into creative, social and engaging dance activity. The programme was developed using the Aesop 7-item checklist, which lists the features an arts programme should have for it to be taken up by the health system and made available to every patient who could benefit. The report outlines the rationale for creating the programme, the outcomes achieved - in addition to reduced falls, cost effectiveness, and the wider impact of the programme. It reports that the pilot successfully brought people from the worlds of dance and older people's exercise together, was able to train dance artists in the evidence-based falls programme, and also developed six evidence-based falls prevention programmes with 196 participants. A total of 73 per cent of participants achieved the target of 50 hours’ attendance over the six months, compared with a national average for completing standard falls prevention exercise programmes of 31 per cent for primary prevention and 46 per cent for secondary prevention. Additional outcomes identified included increases in group identification, relationships and reduced loneliness, functional health and wellbeing, and mental health and wellbeing.

Social isolation and loneliness in the UK: with a focus on the use of technology to tackle these conditions

IOTUK
2017

This report provides an overview of social isolation and loneliness in the UK and highlights innovative uses of technology in addressing the issue. It considers the factors that contribute to the development of social isolation and loneliness, the people most at risk, the impact on an individual's health and wellbeing, and the impact on public services. It outlines three main approaches and interventions used to address social isolation and loneliness: enabling people to maintain existing relationships, facilitating the creation of new connections, and psychological approaches to change the perceptions of individuals that are suffering from loneliness. In particular, it highlights innovative uses of technology to show their potential to increase access to initiatives and deliver interventions in new ways. Local and international best practice case-studies are included. The final section looks at the challenges that exist when trying to finance interventions aiming to combat social isolation and loneliness, and introduces an outcome-based financing model, Social Impact Bonds, which has the potential to allow commissioners and delivery partners to deliver more innovative solutions.

The shed effect: stories from shedders in Scotland

AGE SCOTLAND
2017

This report outlines the positive impact that the growing men’s shed movement is having on later life, and how it is improving men’s health and wellbeing. It gathered individual stories, experiences and observations from 8 men’s sheds, recording 30 individual conversations with shedders, to find out why sheds work for them. It also held 2 conversations with shed supporters. Using direct quotations from the conversations, the report looks at the following themes: how people got involved in their shed; what makes the shed work for them; the importance of sheds as a place to develop new skills and knowledge; the social, health and welfare benefits – including the development of friendships and reduction in loneliness and social isolation; and the positive impact on communities, such as helping other community groups and promoting connections between the generations. The personal stories may be helpful in promoting the benefits of sheds other men and other communities, raising awareness of the shed movement amongst the general public, and providing funders and policy makers with a better understanding of the importance of men’s sheds’ importance, and of why they should continue to value and support them.

HenPower

Equal Arts

“I’ve made some great friends through HenPower. What I like about HenPower is that you’re not entertained, you’re involved” (Tommy Appleby, 91, Hensioner, member of HenPower). HenPower was developed by Equal Arts in 2011 as a pilot project, funded by the Big Lottery Silver Dreams Programme with clear outcomes: to both assist and improve the health and wellbeing, and reduce the loneliness of thirty older people, specifically men. These activities were coupled by the project aiming to demonstrate the benefits of keeping hens in care homes alongside taking part in creativity and as ‘Hensioners’, introduce the hen-related activities and arts sessions to the wider community, such as school children. A Hensioner, like Tommy Appleby, fulfils the role of an active HenPower volunteer who can their use existing skills and knowledge to develop an expertise in hen-keeping. When the project was piloted, the eligibility of recruiting each Hensioner was that they had an interest to help others, who are less able then themselves. As champions of HenPower, the project established in care settings through volunteers, artists and project workers meeting with each of the care staff, residents and relatives to introduce creativity and hen-keeping in north-east England.

Health, care and housing workshop

CENTRE FOR AGEING BETTER, ANCHOR, HANOVER
2017

Summarises discussions from workshop with people across the health, care and housing sectors to develop joint solutions to enable people to live independently for longer and alleviate pressure on the NHS and social care. The workshops aimed to identify the blockages preventing integration between health, care and housing; solutions to transform the system; and the implications for housing supply, commissioning decisions and care pathways. The three fictional personas were used to explore the experiences of individuals through the current health, care and housing system, and to identify what this might look like in an ideal world. Seven main themes emerged from the discussions: learning from good practice, focussing on the individual and their outcomes, rather than systems and cost savings; leadership from Government in relation to older people and older people’s housing; differences between housing and health that can create barriers to joint working; a more active role for local government and local citizens; the need to monitor the impact of early intervention and prevention; and improvements in current and new housing stock. A list of key actions and links to examples of good practice are included.

Results 11 - 20 of 147

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