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Results for 'older people'

Results 11 - 20 of 228

Intergeneration activity: how to be a part of it and why. A guide for older people

DUTTON R.
2018

This guide draws on the experience of St Monica's Trust to provide advice on organising intergenerational activities with older and younger people. It outlines why intergenerational activity is so important, looks some of the key physical and mental benefits for older people and children and young people; and how to set up projects and intergenerational activities. It also provides examples of successful projects, including a pilot at the Cote Lane Retirement Village.

Residents and volunteers: sharing the learning

ABBEYFIELD SOCIETY, AVISON Tracey Berridge, JARVIS Sunnie
2018

This good practice guide shares some of the practical learning from those involved in the Residents as Volunteers project, which supported older people aged over-75 years living in a residential home setting to volunteer. The project was delivered in partnership by Abbeyfield Society and NCVO, and funded by the Big Lottery fund. The guide summarises some of the emotional, social, mental and physical health benefits for residents involved in the project. It then provides advice for getting residents and staff ready to take part in volunteering initiatives; provides ideas to help overcome barriers to volunteering; and ways of identifying volunteering opportunities both inside and outside the home. Case studies from three sites who took part in the Residents as Volunteers project are included: Drake Lodge, Abbeyfield Tavistock Society, Abbeyfield The Dales Society, and Abbeyfield Retirement Living in Nottingham are also included.

Residents as volunteers: final evaluation report

NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR VOLUNTARY ORGANISATIONS, HORNUNG Lisa
2018

An evaluation of the Residents as Volunteers project, which aimed to support older people aged over-75 years living in a residential home setting to volunteer and to measure the impact of volunteering on well-being and quality of life. The project was delivered in partnership by Abbeyfield Society and NCVO, and funded by the Big Lottery fund. A total of 110 residents volunteered during the project. Those participating felt that volunteering had a positive impact on their emotional and social well-being and many also reported that volunteering helped them to stay physically and mentally active. The evaluation identified a number of barriers to volunteering faced by care home residents. These included feeling too old, having a health condition, lack of confidence, narrow views of volunteering or anti-volunteering sentiment. The project also found it was far more difficult to reach residents that had never volunteered before. It also identified barriers for staff and care homes themselves, including existing social interactions, staff to resident ratio, existing volunteering culture and non-supportive environment or lack of management buy-in. The report makes some suggestions to overcome these barriers.

Adapting for ageing: good practice and innovation in home adaptations

ADAMS Sue, HODGES Martin
2018

This report identifies examples of high-quality and innovative practice in the provision of home adaptations for older people and looks at key factors which constitute good practice. It draws on the results of a 'call for practice' from Care and Repair England to identify examples from local areas that are organising and delivering adaptations effectively. The report looks at why home adaptations are important and the evidence for them, what good and poor practice looks like, enablers and barriers to innovation and improvement; and what could help drive wider uptake of good practice. The report identifies a number of key features which could ensure an excellent home adaption service. These include: raising awareness of what is possible amongst older people and professionals, including the availability and benefits of home adaptations; helping older people navigate the system to access adaptations advice, funding, practical help and related services; speedy delivery of home adaptations; involving older people in home adaptation service design; including home adaptations in strategic planning; integration of home adaptations with health and care; linking adaptations with home repairs; working with handyperson services; involving social housing providers in adaptation provision; and taking a preventative approach.

Resilience in an ageing Greater Manchester

BAGNALL Kirsty
2018

This report looks at the resilience of older people and the implications for ageing communities. It includes the findings from a literature review and from workshops with three marginalised groups: older South Asian women; older men living in a deprived area; and refugees. The report explores the importance of recognising the impact different marginalising characteristics on a person’s resilience. The findings suggest that although older people can be vulnerable to shocks and stresses, they also may possess assets to prepare themselves and to support others during an emergency. However, marginalisation and social isolation contribute towards an individual’s ability to react during times of shock. The report also found that older people with additional marginalising characteristics were often found to have high levels of bonding social capital, but struggle to make connections outside of their own community. In order to avoid further marginalisation of people, the report recommends the inclusion of a range of marginalised groups in resilience planning. The report makes recommendations on how policy makers can support the needs of older people across Greater Manchester.

Live music in care: the impact of music interventions for people living and working in care home settings

TAPSON Christine, et al
2018

An evaluation of a music intervention in five care homes in the UK in order to investigate the impact on older residents, staff and the care home environment. The programme, which was delivered by Live Music Now, consisted of an 11-session interactive weekly music programme focussed on singing and the use of voice, and involved training of care staff. For the evaluation, data were drawn from 15 observations of the music sessions, reflective interviews with members of the care teams, staff questionnaires and online questionnaires for those musicians taking part. Thematic analysis of the results identified six themes: the need for collaboration between care home managers, musicians and care staff in delivering music sessions; differing responses to the intervention; empowering the residents and nurturing their identity; the integral part staff, musicians and the researcher played in the success of the intervention and its evaluation; the effect of the intervention on wellbeing; and residents, care staff and managers desire to continue the sessions in the future. The report found that carefully delivered music can provide significant benefits for older people, care staff and care settings, contributing to person-centred care. It found that regular music making can improve the working and living environment for care home residents and staff, and can provide positive social experiences. Music interventions can also play a key role in awakening a sense of identity and empowerment for care home residents. The report makes several recommendations, including that regular participatory music programmes be considered essential for all UK care homes.

Evaluation of Ageing Better in Birmingham year two report

MORETON Rachel, et al
2018

Evaluation of Ageing Better in Birmingham, part of a wider programme of 14 Ageing Better projects located across England taking an asset-based approach to tackle social isolation and loneliness in older people. The evaluation covers activities completed between May 2017 and April 2018. It reports on the range of activities delivered, which included exercise and arts activities; key characteristics of successful activity; how networks are working to make their activities sustainable; and the ways in which activities are attracting male participants. Short case studies of the groups delivered are included throughout. Key findings show that Ageing Better in Birmingham is successfully engaging ethnically and age diverse participants and older adults who are the most-lonely. This has been achieved by mainly working through established voluntary and community groups, which it is noted may not always effective in those areas where the voluntary and community sector is less well developed. The evaluation found Network Leads play an important role in making a successful Network and that Networks involving physical activity appear to be associated with greater wellbeing gains for participants. The report makes recommendations for the future development of the programme.

Age-friendly and inclusive volunteering: review of community contributions in later life

JOPLING Kate, JONES Dan
2018

This review considers how to enable more people to contribute to their communities, in later life (defined as aged 50 and over), with a focus on increasing participation among underrepresented groups, especially those in poor health or living with long-term health conditions. It covers activities such as neighbourliness, helping in the community and volunteering. It draws on a range of sources including a call for evidence, a call for practice and seven roundtable meetings involving over 100 participants. The report looks at why people get involved with their communities and how contributing to communities can improve social connections, and lead to increased life satisfaction and wellbeing; how volunteering can change across the life course; and the practical, structural and emotional barriers to contributing to communities. It sets out a framework for age-friendly, inclusive volunteering, which includes for volunteering to: be flexible and to fit around life changes; to provide support and training needed; to provide opportunities to be sociable and feel connected; value volunteers; provide meaningful activity; and make good use of strengths and experiences. The review makes recommendations for the voluntary, public and private sectors on how to tackle the barriers to enable people to continue to volunteer throughout their lifetime. Case studies of good practice are included throughout the report.

KOMP

No Isolation

Described most simply as a ‘one button screen’, KOMP is a communication tool designed specifically for, and in collaboration with, older people. The product is designed by No Isolation (www.noisolation.com), an Oslo-based start-up founded to reduce involuntary social isolation and loneliness. Following the success of its first product, a telepresence robot named AV1, designed to help children with long-term illness attend school and stay connected with their friends, the company decided to focus on developing an initial solution for seniors and launched KOMP. To date, more than 400 KOMPs are in use in Norway alone, with seven being trialled in the UK. While many have a large family unit, and enjoy spending time with family and friends, older people are still the single largest group affected by loneliness. According to Age UK, 3.6 million older people in the UK live alone, with 1.9 million reporting feeling ignored and invisible. In 2017, Eurostat reported that 1.1 million seniors are in contact with relatives just once a month or less. Seeing the positive impact that being able to communicate has had on users of AV1, No Isolation knew the power that being connected could have, in terms of reducing feelings of loneliness. They were also acutely aware that the devices that are currently available to allow people to go online and socialise with family and friends are either too complicated or do not meet the needs of most seniors. Modifying existing technology simply wasn't an option, so No Isolation worked with older people, families and designers to work out exactly what KOMP needed to feature to work for its target user. By conducting extensive research into how seniors interacted with technology, No Isolation found that touch screens were not intuitive, and for some, not receptive, to the fingertips of the elderly - which led to KOMP only having one large, graspable button. To avoid confusion, the user can switch the device off and on by twisting the button, as well as change the KOMP’s volume by rotating it.

Occupational therapy fall prevention interventions for community-dwelling older adults: a systematic review

ELLIOTT Sharon, LELAND Natalie E.
2018

OBJECTIVE: Accidental falls among community-dwelling older adults are preventable and increase the risk of morbidity, hospitalization, and institutionalization. We updated and broadened a 2008 systematic review examining the evidence for the effectiveness of fall prevention interventions in improving fall-related outcomes, occupational performance, quality of life, and health care facility readmissions for community-dwelling older adults., METHOD: Literature published from 2008 to 2015 from five electronic databases was searched and analysed, RESULTS: Fifty articles met the inclusion criteria and were critically appraised and synthesized-37 provided Level I; 5, Level II; and 8, Level III evidence. Analysis was organized into four intervention themes: single component, multicomponent, multifactorial, and population based. Mixed evidence was found for single-component and multifactorial interventions, strong evidence was found for multicomponent interventions, and moderate evidence was found for population-based interventions., CONCLUSION: These findings can inform the delivery and integration of fall prevention interventions from acute care to community discharge.Copyright © 2018 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

Results 11 - 20 of 228

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