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Results for 'older people'

Results 21 - 30 of 147

North London Cares and South London Cares

North London Cares and South London Cares

North London Cares (NLC) and South London Cares (SLC) are community networks mobilising young professionals to volunteer to spend time with and support their older neighbours in Camden and Islington (NLC) and Lambeth and Southwark (SLC), in order to reduce loneliness and isolation amongst older people (and young professionals alike); to improve the skills, confidence, wellbeing and resilience so that all participants can better navigate the rapidly changing modern world; and to reduce the division across social and generational divides in London.

Music In Mind Camerata in the Community

Manchester Camerata

Manchester Camerata’s involvement with older members of the community began almost ten years ago, in which they ran music composition sessions for people living in care homes alongside Age Friendly Manchester. Since 2012, Camerata runs a programme entitled ‘Music in Mind’, a music-therapy based project for people living with dementia and their carers. This was in response to a growing number of people living with dementia in Greater Manchester, and an interest from Camerata orchestral musicians to deliver this work in partnership with Music Therapists.

ExtraCare's Wellbeing Programme

The ExtraCare Charitable Trust

ExtraCare’s Wellbeing Programme was developed in 2002, in partnership with older people who live at ExtraCare’s Schemes and Villages. The concept was launched following a survey, which highlighted that 75% of residents at one location had not accessed any health screening via their GPs or the NHS. A pilot screening scheme subsequently identified 122 previously undetected conditions amongst a population of just 136, highlighting a clear need for the Programme.

Care Homes Reading Project

University of Exeter

The Exeter Care Homes Reading Project began in the English Department at Exeter University in October 2011. Pioneered by Dr Johanna Harris and strongly supported by the student-led English Society, the project quickly became one of the University’s most successful student volunteer initiatives. The project aim is to strengthen links between young adults and older people, and to promote understanding, recognising that positive intergenerational relationships are key to a healthy community. Through a shared love of stories and poems, the conversations they spark and the human emotions they speak of and into, common ground is found.

No one should have no one: working to end loneliness amongst older people

MORTIMER Jill
2016

This report aims to raise awareness about the importance of addressing chronic loneliness amongst older people. It looks at recent initiatives of Age UK and includes early findings from ‘Testing Promising Approaches to Reducing Loneliness’, an Age UK programme with eight local Age UKs developed to services to find and help older people experiencing loneliness. Taking a community-based approach to combatting widespread loneliness the programme been successfully reduced isolation among the majority of trial participants. The programme identified learning in a number of areas, including: the benefits of building, developing and joining up local services rather than introducing a range of new services; the need for training to carry out guided conversations to identify people’s needs; that phone calls play an important role as part of a range of services; that there are costs involved in supporting networks and volunteers; and measuring levels and changes in loneliness. The report also highlights the action local councillors and MPs can take to prevent and tackle loneliness.

Reducing delayed transfer of care through housing interventions: evidence of impact. Case study

ADAMS Sue
2016

A case study and independent evaluation of a housing intervention designed to help older patients to return home from hospital more rapidly and safety. The initiative is delivered by West of England Care & Repair (WE C&R), who organise clutter clearance/deep cleaning; urgent home repairs, emergency heating repairs and essential housing adaptations for older people in hospital. The evaluation examined all case records, interviewed 15 hospital staff and undertook an in depth analysis of a sample of 4 cases. Analysis of the case records estimated a saving in hospital bed days of £13,526. The cost of housing interventions was £948, resulting in a cost benefit ratio of 14:1. Additional savings in hospital staff time amounted to a further £897. A short case study illustrates how the service was able to help one woman return home from hospital. It concludes that the small scale evaluation is indicative of the potential savings that a practical and effective home from hospital housing intervention service can generate for the health service.

Policy briefing: music, singing and wellbeing in adults with diagnosed conditions or dementia

WHAT WORKS WELLBEING
2016

Drawing on the available evidence, this briefing examines what music and singing interventions work to improve wellbeing of adults living with diagnosed conditions or dementia. While there is ample evidence looking at the impact of music and singing on clinical outcomes such as pain management, coping with hospitalisation, coping with symptoms and managing symptoms of dementia, this new evidence focuses on wellbeing for those living with diagnosed conditions or dementia. Specifically, it focuses on self-reported measures of quality of life; life satisfaction; and anxiety or depression. The paper suggests that there is strong evidence that brief music therapy is an effective intervention to support wellbeing of palliative care patients in hospital settings and initial evidence that music therapy can contribute to improved spiritual wellbeing in hospice patients. There is strong evidence targeted, culturally relevant music interventions can decrease depression in nursing students in a college environment and initial evidence that music therapy can alleviate anxiety in undergraduate students. There is promising evidence that targeted, culturally relevant music and singing interventions can enhance mental wellbeing and decrease depression in older people with chronic conditions in residential and community settings and initial evidence that participation in individual personalised music listening sessions can reduce anxiety and/or depression in nursing home residents with dementia and that listening to music may enhance overall wellbeing for adults with dementia. There is initial evidence that participation in extended community singing programmes can improve quality of life and social and emotional wellbeing in adults living with chronic conditions.

Review of the grey literature: music, singing and wellbeing

DAYKIN Norma, et al
2016

This report reviews evidence from the grey literature on wellbeing outcomes for music and singing for adults. The evidence was received through a call for evidence placed on the What Works Wellbeing website in 2016. A total of 51 reports were received, of which 32 met the inclusion criteria. These included: 12 reports on music and singing interventions with healthy adults; 12 reports on participants with a range of diagnosed conditions including COPD, Parkinson’s, stroke and mental health conditions; and eight reports on participants living with dementia. An additional five unpublished PhDs were also identified. The report summarises the evaluation methods used in the projects; quantitative and qualitative wellbeing outcomes identified; and process evaluations carried out. The review found evidence of improved mental wellbeing in evaluations of two singing interventions for people in the community experiencing, or at risk of, mental health problems. Two studies of music interventions for older participants in hospital also reported improvements in observed wellbeing. Qualitative findings also suggest that participants involved in singing and music projects report positive outcomes such as improved mood, purpose and social interaction. Adults with dementia also experienced increased engagement, relaxation, and better connection with others. Key issues reported from process evaluations included: barriers to activity, such as lack of accessible transport; institutional barriers, particularly in care home settings where projects rely on the support of care staff and managers. Limitations of the evidence are also briefly discussed.

The crises facing our independent living service users: research, evaluation and impact

BLANCHARD Catherine, BRITTAIN Andrea
2016

British Red Cross Independent Living services such as Support at Home, Home from Hospital, and Mobility Aids provide time-limited support to help people live independently in their own home. This study explores the challenges facing people using these services, whose increasingly complex needs are creating greater obstacles to their ability to live independently. Phase one of the study conducted interviews with 29 service users, eight volunteers and 22 staff members into the problems service users face to living independently. Phase two used follow up questionnaires with 170 service users to explore key issues in more depth, including carers, mobility, information and advice, social isolation and loneliness. The results of the questionnaires found high levels of mobility reported-difficulties, which could impact on people's ability to maintain existing relationships and over half of respondents found difficult to find information and advice; The research also found that high numbers of service users live alone and also have high levels of social isolation and loneliness that require long-term intervention. Of the167 service users who answered questions on social isolation, 64 per cent experienced 'some' social isolation and a quarter fell into the 'most isolated' group. Drawing on findings, the report makes recommendations for the Independent Living service in relation to service development, advocacy and communications and data collection. These include: for services to be person-centred, consider partnerships and employ good practice in signposting; for the collection of data on whether people live alone, how long they have lived alone; and being clear in communications that loneliness and social isolation are different concepts.

Ageing Better: social prescribing and older people: guide to developing development project plans

HOY Christine
2014

Developed as part of the Better Ageing project, this guide provides advice on developing social prescribing plans and approaches as a way of tackling loneliness in older people. It highlights the importance of ensuring that social prescribing initiatives sustainable by engaging the support of local groups such as general practices, voluntary and third sector organisations. It also highlights key stages of developing any plan. These include: the importance of empathy and awareness when holding initial conversations to link people with support; mapping local assets, groups and activities; developing ways to find and use information about local sources of support; the collection of evaluation data; use of digital technologies in social prescribing; and presenting local plans using appropriate language and vocabulary. It also suggests key areas that could be covered in social prescribing plans, such as governance and accountability, plan for local evaluation, local collaboration and training and support needs. Includes a list of useful links and resources.

Results 21 - 30 of 147

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