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Results for 'older people'

Results 21 - 30 of 277

Age UK Doncaster Circles project: evaluation report 17/18

CLIFFORD Carol, BOWN Helen
2018

An evaluation of the Circles for Independence in Later Life (CFILL) project in Doncaster, from the period April 2017 to July 2018. Based on the Community Circles model, the project focuses on increasing social engagement, independence and resilience of older people, particularly those at risk of hospitalisation or entry into a care home. The model has been adapted to support older people who have no family or friends or where they don’t want them to be part of the circle. The volunteers becoming part of an older person’s social network or ‘circle’ rather than facilitating others to create one. The evaluation draws on both quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection. The findings show that during the evaluation period 112 people have been involved in the initiative, 76 have had contact with a Circles Connector at Age UK Doncaster, and 40 people out of the 76 who are actively engaged have been matched with a volunteer. The evaluation shows that the project is having a positive impact for those involved towards the four project outcomes: increased confidence in managing long-term health conditions and staying independent; improvements in mental wellbeing; an increase in social connections and less isolation; and benefits for families and volunteers.

Embedding community circles in support for older people living in residential care homes or extra care: a practical resource

ROUTLEDGE Martin, BARTON Cath, WILTON Sharon
2019

Based upon the first two years of experience developing Community Circles in Wigan, this resource shares learning and progress to date. It also outlines the key roles and activities to consider when setting up Community Circles in residential care homes and extra care housing. It will be useful for anyone wanting to include Community Circles as part of the offer of support for older people in residential care or extra care. It will also be of wider use to those looking to embed a range of person and community centred approaches in these types of support. Links to additional guides, reports, tools and materials are included throughout.

Review of key mechanisms in intergenerational practices, and their effectiveness at reducing loneliness/social isolation

BRYER Nia, OWNES Janine
2019

This review examines enablers and barriers to successful intergenerational activities and interventions effectiveness at reducing loneliness and social isolation. It also examines whether there are particular subgroups for whom intergenerational programmes are particularly effective. The review was carried out by researchers at OB3 Research and the Centre for Loneliness Studies at University of Sheffield. It included a literature review, and field work to identify intergenerational interventions and case studies from Wales and the wider UK. The review identified a range of interventions from low level interventions such as raising awareness of ageing issues through to high level intervention where intergenerational activities are embedded into community settings. The findings also indicate that intergenerational practice does more to reduce social isolation and lack of social connections than loneliness. The review identified different benefits for the three groups involved - children/young people, adults and older people. The review also identified a number of enablers that contribute to effective operation of IP (e.g. a visionary leader, a focused perspective) and barriers that hinder action (e.g. time, planning, logistics). The review makes eight recommendations for the Welsh Government to consider in terms of future policy relating to intergenerational practice.

Reducing older people's need for care: exploring risk factors for loss of independence

WHYARD Julia
2019

An executive summary of a report commissioned by Nottinghamshire County Council to explore recent evidence and identify a set of risk factors to older people’s independence. It explores risk factors in three areas: Social and Psychosocial Domain; Long term or Personal Conditions Domain; and Life Events Domain. Risk factors are then further grouped into: modifiable risk factors such as depression or loneliness, where specific support or services can be offered to minimise their impact; and non-modifiable risk factors such as age or history of falls; which can help identify older people at greater risk and who may potentially benefit from some preventative services and support. The report identifies the following factors as being the most significant, primary risk factors to older people’s independence and institutionalisation: Dementia with co-morbidity; Co-morbidity; carer burden; falls; social isolation and loneliness; poor confidence and self-esteem; and poor perception of own health status. The report also highlights examples of preventative tools and interventions that could stop, delay or defer the need for long-term institutional care for older people. The findings will be used to inform Nottinghamshire County Council’s ongoing local development of an “early warning system”.

Social infrastructure: how shared spaces make communities work. Briefing

AMBITION FOR AGEING
2019

This briefing highlights the importance of shared spaces to help reduce social isolation amongst older people as the population ages and austerity leads to more and more state responsibilities falling to civil society. Shared spaces could be public libraries, commercial spaces such as cafes or leisure facilities and parks and green spaces. The briefing explains how different kinds of shared spaces help support different types and levels of social capital. This can be between people who share a common bond as well as connections between diverse groups of people. The ability to build even weak social ties with a diversity of people can help provide bridges to new social worlds, helping older people feel more connected to the places in which they live and improving resilience. The briefing summarises findings from the report, 'Social Infrastructure: how shared spaces make communities work' produced by MICRA as part of the Ambition for Ageing programme.

Social infrastructure: how shared spaces make communities work

YARKER Sophie
2019

This report, from the Ambition for Ageing project, identifies how social infrastructure in neighbourhoods can promote social interaction and reduce social isolation for older people. Social infrastructure provides spaces and opportunities for people to have social interactions and build connections. The report argues there needs to be a diversity of social infrastructure to support different types and levels of social connection, and considers the importance of the connections made between diverse groups of people - also known as bridging capital. It also looks at the types of social infrastructure that facilitate this, which tend to be places that the majority of the community would have the opportunity to visit, such as public libraries, cafes and parks and open public spaces. Key points include: that shared spaces within neighbourhoods are vital for reducing social isolation for older people; that different kinds of social infrastructure help support different types and levels of social capital; and the need for social infrastructure that supports intergenerational and intercultural encounters. Despite its often informal nature, social infrastructure is not naturally occurring and therefore The report highlights the need for direct investment and support to help the development of the social infrastructure and the creation of third places.

Addressing older men's experiences of loneliness and social isolation in later life

WILLIS Paul, et al
2019

A report summarising the key findings from a two-year study to explore how older men from different backgrounds stay socially connected and combat loneliness and social isolation. A total of 111 men aged 65+ from five different groups took part in interviews. The groups were: men who are single or living alone; men living rural areas; men caring for partners; gay men who live alone; and men living with hearing loss. The finding identify variations in experiences of loneliness and social isolation across different groups. Other key findings show that men valued groups that tried to increase social opportunities and interaction; they particularly valued mixed-age groups, and groups that facilitated emotional and social ties with other men. The briefing looks at the implications of the findings for social care, voluntary services, and for policy makers and commissioners of voluntary and community-based service. It calls for greater priority to be given to the long-term resourcing and running of community-groups for older adults. It also recommends there should also be more inclusive, tailored groups for older men in marginalised groups.

Working inclusively to make communities age-friendly: briefing

AMBITION FOR AGEING
2019

This briefing paper looks at how to design effective and inclusive ways of working to reach more older people in minority or marginalised communities. It argues that equality, diversity and inclusivity are central to understanding and reducing social isolation, and looks at key ways to embed inclusion in building age-friendly communities. These include: having a good understanding of communities themselves; designing genuinely inclusive opportunities, as well delivering targeted approaches; and working with an equalities mindset. The briefing draws on learning from research and reflection by the Ambition for Ageing Equalities Board. This briefing will be of interest to those working to tackle loneliness and social isolation of older people from marginalised communities, and those concerned that community and neighbourhood-level work reaches people in marginalised communities.

Interventions to improve adherence to exercise therapy for falls prevention in community-dwelling older adults: systematic review and meta-analysis

HUGHES Katie J., et al
2019

Background: exercise therapy is highly recommended for falls prevention in older adults; however, poor exercise adherence may limit treatment effectiveness. Objective: to assess the effectiveness of interventions to improve exercise adherence for community-dwelling adults (aged over 65 years), at risk of falling. Methods: eight databases were searched to identify randomised/quasi-randomised trials. The Capability, Opportunity, Motivation model of behaviour (COM-B) was used to categorise the identified adherence interventions. Studies with similar interventions that provided adherence outcome data per group were analysed to establish pooled intervention effect. Protocol registration with Propsero: (CRD42016033677). Results: of the 20 trials included (n = 4419), five provided data per group for adherence outcome. Meta-analysis of four studies (n = 482), containing interventions exploring the way exercise is delivered, demonstrated significantly better adherence in the intervention group (n = 166 experimental, n = 161 control Fixed effects model (FEM), SMD = 0.48 95% CI [0.26–0.70] P < 0.0001 I2 = 0%, very low GRADE evidence). Within this limited evidence base, interventions using telecommunication and the integration of exercise into activities of daily living appear most promising when delivering exercise at home. Meta-analysis to explore the effect that these interventions to improve adherence had on balance (n = 166 experimental, n = 161 control Random-effects model (REM), SMD = 0.82, 95% CI [−1.20–2.84] P = 0.43 I2 = 52%) and gait (n = 59 experimental, n = 56 control REM, SMD = 0.29, 95% CI [−1.62–2.20] P = 0.77 I2= 48%), found no statistically significant effect. Conclusions: adherence to exercise can be positively influenced; however, insufficient data exists to support any single intervention that also achieves effective outcomes for balance and gait.

Wellbeing Service

H4ALL

Hillingdon H4All is a social prescription/wellbeing service that supports patients 65 and over to better manage long term health conditions and social isolation. The service operates as a Community Interest Company (CIC) and is a collaboration between five prominent local third sector charities namely Age UK Hillingdon, Disablement Association Hillingdon (DASH), Harlington Hospice, Hillingdon Carers and Hillingdon Mind and is commissioned by Hillingdon CCG. The service is an augmentation of the former Primary Care Navigator (PCN) project which was managed by Age UK Hillingdon and funded by Hillingdon CCG in 2014. The new service was established in April 2016 and used learning from the former PCN project to provide an enhanced service with the following features:

Results 21 - 30 of 277

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
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