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Results for 'older people'

Results 31 - 40 of 228

Health 2020 priority area four: creating supportive environments and resilient communities: a compendium of inspirational examples


2018

Brings together innovative examples of actions taken in 13 countries to strengthen resilience and build supportive environments for population health and well-being. The examples show how building resilience can be achieved by developing and sustaining partnerships between institutions and communities; by community action and bottom-up efforts; at system level, both nationally and locally. The examples, primarily gathered from community initiatives, are linked to the four types of resilience capacities: adaptive, absorptive, anticipatory and transformative. Topics covered include the role of resilience building in addressing human rights, health inequities, environmental hazards, and health-related topics such as communicable and noncommunicable diseases. Examples from the UK include: Promoting social connections and community networks for older people through Better in Sheffield; Supporting local systems to tackle the social determinants of health inequalities; Strengthening resilience through the early intervention and prevention: breaking the generational cycle of crime project; and A social movement for health and resilience in Blackburn with Darwen. Each example attempts to describe: the action undertaken; the resilience-related issue that the action aimed to address; and the impact and lessons learnt in the process of strengthening resilience.

Older Carers Project (Every One)

Lincolnshire County Council

In acknowledgement of the particular difficulties facing older carers, Lincolnshire County Council (LCC) secured funding from the Better Care Fund to look at how it supports older carers who are looking after someone with a learning disability in their home. During early 2015 LCC commissioned what was then, Lincolnshire Carers and Young Carers Partnership (LCYCP) now known as ‘Every-One’ to undertake the Older Carers Project. The project provided support for carers over the age of 55 who had grown up children with learning disabilities to produce contingency and future care plans. The aim of this was to ensure that when the carers could no longer continue in their caring role, sufficient plans were in place to avoid a crisis where their son or daughter may be forced into residential care causing unnecessary stress and expense.

Experiences of being: the benefit of drama, music and dancing in improving the wellbeing of older people in care homes

NANDAKUMARA Reva
2017

This report highlights the benefits of using drama and creative techniques with older people, in particular those with dementia. It outlines the results of an initiative which ran drama workshops in 17 Anchor care homes, with the intention that they could become a sustainable part of the activities led by the care home staff to improve the lives of residents, both physically and mentally. A professional drama teacher worked collaboratively with the staff at each care home, and provided opportunities for staff to suggest modifications to the workshops. The results highlight the mental and physical health benefits of the creative activities for care home residents and the sustainability of the methods provided by the trainer at the various care homes. The report concludes that the workshops provide a simple and effective way of improving the experience of care home residents and can easily become part of the selection of regular activities available at care homes. They are inexpensive and scalable and, led to an improvement in residents' levels of self-esteem and self-worth. Care staff also found that the sessions enhanced communication, giving residents the opportunity to share their knowledge and experience and talk about their lives, homes and communities.

Small but significant: the impact and cost benefits of handyperson services

ADAMS Sue
2018

An evaluation of the impacts and cost benefits of handyperson services carrying out small repairs and minor adaptations in the home for older people. It looks at how handyperson service fit into the current policy landscape summarises current evidence on their impact and cost effectiveness. It then provides an in depth evaluation of the of Preston Care and Repair handyperson service, with analysis of outputs, outcomes and examines the cost benefits in relation to falls prevention. The evaluation involved data analysis of jobs completed, a survey of users of the service and interviews with staff and service users. It reports that during the 9 month evaluation period 1,399 jobs were carried out in the homes of 697 older people, which exceeded outcome targets. Of people using the service, 46 percent were over 80 years and 72 percent were older people living alone. Older people also valued the service. Ninety-six percent of those surveyed said that the Preston Care and Repair handyperson service made them less worried about their home and 100 percent said that they would recommend the service to others. Analysis of the falls prevention impact on a small number of higher risk cases, found that for every £1 spent on the handyperson service the saving to health and care was £4.28. Other health and social care related outcomes included a risk reduction for hospital admission risk reduction and faster discharge to home, improved wellbeing, safer independent living, and reduced isolation. The report illustrates the impacts of handyperson services cover health, housing and social care aims and objectives. They also offer a cost effective solution with significant cost benefits and a high rate of return on investment, both financial and social.

Arts in care homes: a rapid mapping of training provision

ALLEN Penny
2018

This report uses desk research, interviews and online searches to map creative training provision available to artists and staff working in care homes in the UK. The mapping took place in 2017 and identified examples of good practice, innovative delivery, and opportunities for growth and development. It total, 65 providers of training were identified, delivering training in person or online. Training was aimed at artists, health/care providers, volunteers, arts venues, activity coordinators and friends/family. Seven main types of training opportunity identified: toolkits; one-off workshops; whole home and leadership training; maintenance models; mentoring; networks and peer learning; and conferences. The results highlight the diverse nature of the sector and the multiple pathways for people to access training, which present both challenges and opportunities for training providers. The author also highlights variation in quality of provision and argues for a system of accreditation. Case study examples are included throughout the report, and appendices provide links to a range of toolkits and providers.

Exposure to nature gardens has time-dependent associations with mood improvements for people with mid- and late-stage dementia

WHITE Piran CL., et al
2018

Exposure to green space and nature has a potential role to play in the care of people with dementia, with possible benefits including improved mood and slower disease progression. In this observational study at a dementia care facility in the UK, we used carer-assessed measures to evaluate change in mood of residents with mid- to late-stage dementia following exposure to a nature garden. We found that exposure to nature was associated with a beneficial change in patient mood. There was a non-linear relationship between time spent outdoors and mood outcome. Improvements in patient mood were associated with relatively short duration exposures to nature, and no additional measureable increases in mood were found with exposures beyond 80–90 minutes duration. Whilst further investigation is required before causality can be determined, these results raise important questions for policy about the integration of outdoor space into the design of dementia care facilities and programmes.

LAUGH research project

Cardiff Metropolitan University

The Ludic Artefacts Using Gesture & Haptics (LAUGH) research project was born out of an identified need for playful objects for people with advanced dementia and based on literature and previous research on the benefits to wellbeing of playfulness and hand-use. The aims of the project were to look at: How can handcraft and creative making inform the development of new devices and playful activities to promote individual and social wellbeing for people with dementia? And how might handcraft activities be augmented via new technologies and smart materials to produce new kinds of engaging, playful artefacts to amuse, distract, comfort, engage, bring joy, and promote ‘in the moment’ living for people with dementia?

Using dolls for therapeutic purposes: A study on nursing home residents with severe dementia

CANTARELLA A., et al
2018

Objectives: Among the psychosocial interventions intended to reduce the behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), doll therapy (DT) is increasingly used in clinical practice. Few studies on DT have been based on empirical data obtained with an adequate procedure; however, none have assessed its efficacy using an active control group, and the scales used to assess changes in BPSD are usually unreliable. The aim of the present study was to measure the impact of DT on people with severe dementia with a reliable, commonly used scale for assessing their BPSD, and the related distress in formal caregivers. Effects of DT on the former's everyday abilities (i.e., eating behaviour) were also examined. Method: Twenty‐nine nursing home residents aged from 76 to 96 years old, with severe dementia (Alzheimer's or vascular dementia), took part in the experiment. They were randomly assigned to an experimental group that used dolls or an active control group that used hand warmers with sensory characteristics equivalent to the dolls. Benefits of DT on BPSD and related formal caregiver distress were examined with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. The effects of DT on eating behaviour were examined with the Eating Behavior Scale. Results: Only the DT group showed a reduction in BPSD scores and related caregiver distress. DT did not benefit eating behaviour, however. Conclusions: This study suggests that DT is a promising approach for reducing BPSD in people with dementia, supporting evidence emerging from previous anecdotal studies.

LAUGH: playful objects in advanced dementia care

TREADAWAY Cathy
2018

The article reports on an international research project led by the Cardiff School of Art and Design at Cardiff Metropolitan University to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia. The aim of the project was to understand the best ways to design objects that can give pleasure and comfort to people in the advanced stages of dementia and to provide guidance for designers working in the sector. The article discusses the participatory approach to the research, testing and feedback and provides an example of one of the LAUGH objects that was found to have a significant impact on wellbeing - a comforting "Hug". The article also covers how the objects stimulate memories and some of the outcomes from the project and future direction.

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LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project New practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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