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Results for 'older people'

Results 31 - 40 of 330

'The billion dollar question': embedding prevention in older people's services: 10 'high impact' changes

ALLEN Kerry, GLASBY Jon
2010

There is a need to invest more fully and strategically in both prevention and rehabilitation for older people, to help them stay healthier, more independent and more socially included for longer and to recover these capacities as fully as possible when they do require hospital treatment. While there is growing recognition that only a more preventative agenda will be sufficient to respond to current and future pressures, there is much less clarity about how to do this in practice. This paper seeks to identify the most promising ‘10 high impact changes’ with regards to prevention in older people’s services. The paper draws on two main sources. The first is an EU review of prevention and long-term care in older people’s services across 14 European counties known as Interlinks. The second key source is a recent review of the social and economic benefits of adult social care, commissioned by the Department of Health and Downing Street. This paper identifies and reviews the following 10 prevention strategies: promoting healthy lifestyles; vaccination; screening; falls prevention; housing adaptations and practical support; telecare and technology; intermediate care; reablement; partnership working; and personalisation.

A systematic review of the benefits of home telecare for frail elderly people and those with long-term conditions

BARLOW James, et al
2007

This systematic review of 68 randomised controlled trials and 30 large scale observational studies, two-thirds from the USA and 10% from the UK, finds that the most effective telecare interventions appear to be automated vital signs monitoring (for reducing health service use) and telephone follow-up by nurses (for improving clinical indicators and reducing health service use). The cost-effectiveness of these interventions is less certain. Far less evidence about mental health conditions, such as dementia or depression, was found than for physical health conditions, such as heart disease and diabetes. In addition, very few studies were found on the effects of home safety and security systems such as fall detectors and alarm systems, despite their widespread use.

The use of telephone befriending in low level support for socially isolated older people - an evaluation

CATTAN Mima, KIME Nicola, BAGNALL Anne-Marie
2011

Telephone befriending schemes have long been considered an effective method to reduce loneliness among older people. This study investigated the impact of a national scheme for 40 isolated and lonely older people, involving 8 project sites in the UK. It assessed the impact of different models of telephone-based befriending services on older people's health and well-being. Findings revealed that the service helped older people to gain confidence, re-engage with the community and become socially active again. Overall, three main topics were identified: why older people valued the service; what impact it had made on their health and well-being; and what they wanted from the service. Also, nine subtopics emerged: life is worth living; gaining a sense of belonging; knowing they had a friend; a healthy mind is a healthy body; the alleviation of loneliness and anxiety; increased self-confidence; ordinary conversation; a trusted and reliable service; the future - giving something back. In conclusion, telephone befriending schemes for older people provide low-cost means for socially isolated older people to become more confident and independent and develop a sense of self-respect.

The older adults’ NHS and social care return on investment tool: technical report

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2020

The technical report of a project which aimed to provide a return on investment (ROI) tool to help stakeholders and decision-makers to compare the cost-effectiveness of interventions to reduce the need for services in older adults. This report provides detail of the literature review process, the process of assessment and prioritisation of interventions for inclusion in the tool, and the detailed modelling methods used. Based on evidence from the literature review and through discussion with expert Steering Group members, nine interventions are included in the ROI tool. These are: community singing; a help at home scheme; a befriending service; the WHELD intervention for people living with dementia in nursing home; the INTERCOM intervention providing hospital discharge support for COPD patients; voluntary and community sector (VCS) services aimed at patients with long-term conditions, using social prescribing and other approaches to put patients in touch with services; health coaching delivered by inter-professional health and social care services; the BELLA intervention providing self-management support for COPD patients; and a home care reablement service. The return investment tool is available to download. It can be adapted to local conditions and shows the economic benefits of each intervention.

Together in the 2020s: twenty ideas for creating a Britain for all ages by 2030

UNITED FOR ALL AGES
2020

This report presents 20 innovative ideas to bring older and younger people together and create a stronger society. The ideas cover three areas of public life: practical intergenerational projects, social and economic policies, and culture, media and sport. The report also highlights how intergenerational projects can change attitudes, improve older people’s health and care, tackle loneliness and increase trust and understanding between generations. The ideas include enabling more care homes to become community hubs; extending schools’ opening hours to provide community spaces for intergenerational activities; scaling up homesharing schemes for older and younger people; and the creation of a government department to join up and support intergenerational action. The recommendations draw on contributions from 25 national and local organisations.

The intergenerational evaluation toolkit

JARROTT Shannon
2019

Intergenerational shared sites and intergenerational programmes that bring younger and older generations together can have many positive benefits. This Toolkit provides three resources to support programme providers and researchers to demonstrate the impact of intergenerational programming and the practices which achieve outcomes. The toolkit includes an Intergenerational Practice Evaluation tool to evaluate single intergenerational activities and the impact of programmes over time; a guide to planning an intergenerational evaluation; and a list of reliable outcome measures. The toolkit has been developed following 15 years of collaborative innovative practice and evaluation research.

Ageing Better in Camden: interim evaluation report

REMBISZEWSKI Perla, BIDEY Tim, VANSON Tim
2018

The first of two interim evaluation reports to explore the outcomes projects commissioned by Ageing Better in Camden (ABC), a six-year programme to address social isolation and loneliness in older people living in Camden. This report focuses on the progress of 8 projects, which include a Digital Inclusion project; North London Cares Intergenerational and Men’s Action projects; Community Action Projects, and LGBT+ Connect providing opportunities for older Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans people in Camden to socialise. Each project focused chapter includes details of participants, evidence of impact and individual case studies. The evaluation draws on qualitative data from conversations with project participants and project leads, as well as quantitative data from demographic surveys. Early findings suggest that the projects are achieving the anticipated positive impacts for older people. Positive impacts include: improved mental and physical well-being; new friendships and connections; improved confidence and independence; relationship building across communities and generations. The evaluation found that frontline staff played a key role in enabling participants to achieve positive impacts.

Connecting communities: housing at the heart of integrated health and social care in Scotland

HANOVER SCOTLAND
2019

A summary of findings from the Connecting Communities project, an action research project in a mix of amenity, sheltered and very sheltered Hanover housing developments in Scotland. The research aimed to understand what matters most to people living, visiting and working in Hanover housing. It also aimed to test out ways to build connectedness and increase wellbeing. The report describes the methodology used and sets out the lessons for the housing, health and care sectors. It also demonstrates how the organisation is using 'Five ways to Well-being' to improve the wellbeing of their residents. The five ways are: Connecting, Being active; Taking notice; Keep learning; and Giving to create a sense of purpose and belonging. Personal stories are used to illustrate the benefits of the approach. The findings show that home is fundamental to the well-being of people and the sustainability of communities. It makes recommendations for better engagement with older people when services are being developed and for a better understanding of the networks and supports which already exist in communities. The report highlights that housing associations should be fully included in the ongoing integration of health and care.

Is co-living a good choice to support healthy, happy ageing at home? Summary and conclusions

BURGESS Gemma
2019

A summary of research carried out by the Cambridge Centre for Housing and Planning Research to explore the extent to which co-living housing models might provide a good housing solution for people as they get older. Co-living is a form of housing that combines private living spaces with shared communal facilities, and explicitly seeks to promote social contact and build community. Models include cohousing communities where people live together in a community setting and homeshares, where an older person lives alongside a younger person. This research summary outlines some of the benefits and risks of co-living models.

Ageing better: working with older people to reduce social isolation and loneliness. A guide for Housing Associations

AGE BETTER IN SHEFFIELD
2019

A short guide providing evidence about what’s worked in reducing social isolation and homelessness among older people, focusing on work in the housing sector. It draws on lessons from some of the 14 partners who are delivering projects as part of the Ageing Better programme, which was funded by the National Lottery Community Fund. It identifies five key messages, which include for housing associations: to consider how they can strengthen their strategic and operational roles in addressing social isolation and loneliness; to develop an understand of local areas, mapping areas where older people are at most risk; to share their expertise in co-production to benefit local communities; and to consider further work with care homes for more long-term work to address loneliness and isolation. Although focusing on the housing sector, many of the themes identified have wider applicability to the design of any programmes seeking to reduce loneliness and isolation across all age groups.

Results 31 - 40 of 330

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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