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Results for 'older people'

Results 41 - 50 of 291

Addressing older men's experiences of loneliness and social isolation in later life

WILLIS Paul, et al
2019

A report summarising the key findings from a two-year study to explore how older men from different backgrounds stay socially connected and combat loneliness and social isolation. A total of 111 men aged 65+ from five different groups took part in interviews. The groups were: men who are single or living alone; men living rural areas; men caring for partners; gay men who live alone; and men living with hearing loss. The finding identify variations in experiences of loneliness and social isolation across different groups. Other key findings show that men valued groups that tried to increase social opportunities and interaction; they particularly valued mixed-age groups, and groups that facilitated emotional and social ties with other men. The briefing looks at the implications of the findings for social care, voluntary services, and for policy makers and commissioners of voluntary and community-based service. It calls for greater priority to be given to the long-term resourcing and running of community-groups for older adults. It also recommends there should also be more inclusive, tailored groups for older men in marginalised groups.

Working inclusively to make communities age-friendly: briefing

AMBITION FOR AGEING
2019

This briefing paper looks at how to design effective and inclusive ways of working to reach more older people in minority or marginalised communities. It argues that equality, diversity and inclusivity are central to understanding and reducing social isolation, and looks at key ways to embed inclusion in building age-friendly communities. These include: having a good understanding of communities themselves; designing genuinely inclusive opportunities, as well delivering targeted approaches; and working with an equalities mindset. The briefing draws on learning from research and reflection by the Ambition for Ageing Equalities Board. This briefing will be of interest to those working to tackle loneliness and social isolation of older people from marginalised communities, and those concerned that community and neighbourhood-level work reaches people in marginalised communities.

Interventions to improve adherence to exercise therapy for falls prevention in community-dwelling older adults: systematic review and meta-analysis

HUGHES Katie J., et al
2019

Background: exercise therapy is highly recommended for falls prevention in older adults; however, poor exercise adherence may limit treatment effectiveness. Objective: to assess the effectiveness of interventions to improve exercise adherence for community-dwelling adults (aged over 65 years), at risk of falling. Methods: eight databases were searched to identify randomised/quasi-randomised trials. The Capability, Opportunity, Motivation model of behaviour (COM-B) was used to categorise the identified adherence interventions. Studies with similar interventions that provided adherence outcome data per group were analysed to establish pooled intervention effect. Protocol registration with Propsero: (CRD42016033677). Results: of the 20 trials included (n = 4419), five provided data per group for adherence outcome. Meta-analysis of four studies (n = 482), containing interventions exploring the way exercise is delivered, demonstrated significantly better adherence in the intervention group (n = 166 experimental, n = 161 control Fixed effects model (FEM), SMD = 0.48 95% CI [0.26–0.70] P < 0.0001 I2 = 0%, very low GRADE evidence). Within this limited evidence base, interventions using telecommunication and the integration of exercise into activities of daily living appear most promising when delivering exercise at home. Meta-analysis to explore the effect that these interventions to improve adherence had on balance (n = 166 experimental, n = 161 control Random-effects model (REM), SMD = 0.82, 95% CI [−1.20–2.84] P = 0.43 I2 = 52%) and gait (n = 59 experimental, n = 56 control REM, SMD = 0.29, 95% CI [−1.62–2.20] P = 0.77 I2= 48%), found no statistically significant effect. Conclusions: adherence to exercise can be positively influenced; however, insufficient data exists to support any single intervention that also achieves effective outcomes for balance and gait.

Wellbeing Service

H4ALL

Hillingdon H4All is a social prescription/wellbeing service that supports patients 65 and over to better manage long term health conditions and social isolation. The service operates as a Community Interest Company (CIC) and is a collaboration between five prominent local third sector charities namely Age UK Hillingdon, Disablement Association Hillingdon (DASH), Harlington Hospice, Hillingdon Carers and Hillingdon Mind and is commissioned by Hillingdon CCG. The service is an augmentation of the former Primary Care Navigator (PCN) project which was managed by Age UK Hillingdon and funded by Hillingdon CCG in 2014. The new service was established in April 2016 and used learning from the former PCN project to provide an enhanced service with the following features:

Cultural engagement and incident depression in older adults: evidence from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

FANCOURT Daisy, TYMOSZUK Urszula
2019

Background: There is a recognised need for the identification of factors that might be protective against the development of depression in older adults. Over the past decade, there has been growing research demonstrating the effects of cultural engagement (which combines a number of protective factors including social interaction, cognitive stimulation and gentle physical activity) on the treatment of depression, but as yet not on its prevention. Aims: To explore whether cultural engagement in older adults is associated with a reduced risk of developing depression over the following decade. Method: Working with data from 2148 adults in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing who were free from depression at baseline, the study used logistic regression models to explore associations between frequency of cultural engagement (including going to museums, theatre and cinema) and the risk of developing depression over the following 10 years using a combined index of the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) and physician-diagnosed depression. Results: There was a dose–response relationship between frequency of cultural engagement and the risk of developing depression independent of sociodemographic, health-related and social confounders. This equated to a 32% lower risk of developing depression for people who attended every few months (odds ratio (OR) = 0.68, 95% CI 0.47–0.99, P = 0.046) and a 48% lower risk for people who attended once a month or more (OR = 0.52, 95% CI 0.34–0.80, P = 0.003). Results were robust to sensitivity analyses exploring reverse causality, subclinical depressive symptoms and alternative CES-D thresholds. Conclusions: Cultural engagement appears to be an independent risk-reducing factor for the development of depression in older age.

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company

Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company, grew out of a commission in 2010-11, in the run up for the Cultural Olympiad 2012, to develop a dance piece with a group of older women. Following the event, a group of women wanted to continue the dance group so Moving Memory was formed. Skipping forward a few years, along with the performance pieces that Moving Memory creates for public events, they also deliver workshops, bespoke participatory projects and training. Moving Memory's vision is for a society where older people live longer, healthier and more fulfilling lives because they participate in artistic, creative and physical activities. The work they produce – and the way they produce it – aims to challenge perceived notions of age and ageing, by asking audiences and participants to look beyond their assumptions and changing attitudes towards older people.

Harnessing technology to tackle loneliness

WPI ECONOMICS, OAKLEY Matthew, ROSE Christina Bovill
2019

This report, commissioned by Vodafone and produced by WPI Economics, looks at the prevalence of loneliness in the UK and role technology can play in alleviating loneliness in older people by keeping them connected to their family and friends for longer. Focusing on chronic loneliness amongst people aged over 50, the report also provides new estimates of the potential scale of costs associated with loneliness, which it estimates as £1.8 billion per year to the UK economy. It highlights how technology can be used alongside more traditional community services to facilitate social interaction, and that learning how to use it more fully can reduce loneliness and promote an active lifestyle. This can help older people remain independent in their homes and communities and increase confidence and the likelihood of positive interactions. It can also help to maintain and build networks and contacts, with technology used as a way of keeping in touch with friends and family and accessing new communities and groups. The report outlines five recommendations to promote the use of technology in tackling loneliness, which over improving access to technology, increasing confidence and skills in the use of technology and supporting innovative technological solutions.

A menu of interventions for productive healthy ageing: for pharmacy teams working in different settings

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2019

This guide lists interventions that pharmacy teams working in different healthcare settings can use to support older people to improve the quality of their lives. It includes evidence-based interventions on: preventing and reducing falls; increasing levels of physical activity; maintaining a healthy weight and preventing malnutrition; reducing the risk of social isolation and loneliness; reducing the risk of dementia; supporting people diagnosed with dementia; delaying the progress of dementia and reducing the need for medicines. For each area the guide includes the rationale for intervention, a list of suggested interventions and evidence of impact. The guidance will also be useful for pharmaceutical and medical committees, local authorities, clinical commissioning groups and local NHS England teams.

Animal magic: the benefits of being around and caring for animals across care settings

CARE INSPECTORATE
2019

A collection of case studies which show how being around and caring for animals can benefit many children and adults using a range of care services. It shows how animals and pets can enhance the quality of life of children and adults by helping with relaxation, providing companionship, enhancing relationships, providing a positive focus to people's lives, and encouraging people to be active and making them feel happier. Contact with animals can also enhance relationships with their families, their friends and with care professionals - promoting a culture of kindness for people of all ages. The case studies include examples from very sheltered housing support, fostering services, homeless hostels, dementia care, and care homes. Each case study is annotated with details of relevant Scottish Health and Social Care Standards (Dignity and respect, Compassion, Be included, Responsive care and support, and Wellbeing) and Getting it Right for Every Child (GIRFEC) wellbeing indicators that apply to the example.

Evaluation of the H4All Wellbeing Service pilot: April 1st 2016 - January 31st 2017

JAMMU Dalvinder, BOND Andy
2017

An evaluation of the first 10 months of the Hillingdon H4All Wellbeing Service pilot, commissioned by Hillingdon CCG in April 2016. The service is a collaboration between 5 local third sector charities and provides older patients in Hillingdon with a range of services, including: information and advice, practical support, goal setting and ongoing support to manage LTCs, befriending and mentoring, and signposting and referral to voluntary and statutory services. During the evaluation period the H4All service supported 1,099 patients with 2,729 enquiries resulting in 11,675 contacts with/for patients. Analysis of completed Patient Activation Measure (PAM) outcome questionnaires found that most people accessing the service increased their PAM score, with an average movement of 8 points per patient in their individual scores. A total of 44 of the Hillingdon GP practices referred to the Wellbeing Service during the evaluation period in the first ten months and gave very positive feedback. The appendices include individual patient case studies highlight how they have benefitted from the service.

Results 41 - 50 of 291

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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