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Results for 'older people'

Results 51 - 60 of 251

Ageing Better: national evaluation short learning report: July 2018

CAMPBELL Diarmid, COX Korina
2018

Shares learning from the 14 partners of the Ageing Better programme, which aim to support people aged over 50 who are experiencing, or at risk of, social isolation and loneliness. The report draws on surveys of programme participants, visits to each of the 14 programme areas, and feedback from stakeholders from the partnerships. It reports that. to date, Ageing Better partnerships have worked with approximately 70,000 participants and 13,250 volunteers. The report also shows how Ageing Better, participants are, on average, less socially isolated and lonely, taking a more active role in their communities, have improved health and wellbeing, and are getting involved in delivering and designing projects. It also highlights benefits for volunteers and how Ageing Better is helping organisations improve partnership working and increasing skills, capacity and knowledge among participants helping to deliver and design programmes. Links to the partnership websites are also included.

Strategies employed by older people to manage loneliness: systematic review of qualitative studies and model development

KHARICHA Kalpa, et al
2018

Objectives: To (i) systematically identify and review strategies employed by community dwelling lonely older people to manage their loneliness and (ii) develop a model for managing loneliness. Methods: A narrative synthesis review of English-language qualitative evidence, following Economic and Social Research Council guidance. Seven electronic databases were searched (1990–January 2017). The narrative synthesis included tabulation, thematic analysis, and conceptual model development. All co-authors assessed eligibility of final papers and reached a consensus on analytic themes. Results: From 3,043 records, 11 studies were eligible including a total of 502 older people. Strategies employed to manage loneliness can be described by a model with two overarching dimensions, one related to the context of coping (alone or with/in reference to others), the other related to strategy type (prevention/action or acceptance/endurance of loneliness). The dynamic and subjective nature of loneliness is reflected in the variety of coping mechanisms, drawing on individual coping styles and highlighting considerable efforts in managing time, contacting others, and keeping loneliness hidden. Cognitive strategies were used to re-frame negative feelings, to make them more manageable or to shift the focus from the present or themselves. Few unsuccessful strategies were described. Conclusion: Strategies to manage loneliness vary from prevention/action through to acceptance and endurance. There are distinct preferences to cope alone or involve others; only those in the latter category are likely to engage with services and social activities. Older people who deal with their loneliness privately may find it difficult to articulate an inability to cope.

Living well for longer: the economic argument for investing in the health and wellbeing of older people in Wales

EDWARDS Rhiannon Tudor, et al
2018

This report, commissioned by Public Health Wales, explores the economic case for investing in older people in Wales to support people to live longer in good health in older age. It looks at investing in older people as assets, highlighting the importance of their contribution to the economy in Wales and the importance of housing and enabling independence in later life. It then draws on the results of rapid reviews of international and UK evidence to show the relative cost-effectiveness and return on investment on preventing loneliness and social isolation; caring for older carers; and preventing falls. It concludes that enabling people to work for longer, facilitating volunteering and supporting working parents through care of grandchildren brings many economic returns in terms of improving wellbeing; reducing loneliness, and supporting formal and wider community services. In addition co-production enables older people to remain active in the community and provides intergenerational benefits within the community and public sector services. The report concludes that Wales should focus investment on: fully integrated health and care services; maintaining physical and mental well being in older age, with a focus on reducing social isolation and loneliness; maintaining services to promote prevention (particularly falls prevention), rehabilitation and reablement; investment in sustainable homes, transport and communities; and support for informal carers.

Health 2020 priority area four: creating supportive environments and resilient communities: a compendium of inspirational examples


2018

Brings together innovative examples of actions taken in 13 countries to strengthen resilience and build supportive environments for population health and well-being. The examples show how building resilience can be achieved by developing and sustaining partnerships between institutions and communities; by community action and bottom-up efforts; at system level, both nationally and locally. The examples, primarily gathered from community initiatives, are linked to the four types of resilience capacities: adaptive, absorptive, anticipatory and transformative. Topics covered include the role of resilience building in addressing human rights, health inequities, environmental hazards, and health-related topics such as communicable and noncommunicable diseases. Examples from the UK include: Promoting social connections and community networks for older people through Better in Sheffield; Supporting local systems to tackle the social determinants of health inequalities; Strengthening resilience through the early intervention and prevention: breaking the generational cycle of crime project; and A social movement for health and resilience in Blackburn with Darwen. Each example attempts to describe: the action undertaken; the resilience-related issue that the action aimed to address; and the impact and lessons learnt in the process of strengthening resilience.

Older Carers Project (Every One)

Lincolnshire County Council

In acknowledgement of the particular difficulties facing older carers, Lincolnshire County Council (LCC) secured funding from the Better Care Fund to look at how it supports older carers who are looking after someone with a learning disability in their home. During early 2015 LCC commissioned what was then, Lincolnshire Carers and Young Carers Partnership (LCYCP) now known as ‘Every-One’ to undertake the Older Carers Project. The project provided support for carers over the age of 55 who had grown up children with learning disabilities to produce contingency and future care plans. The aim of this was to ensure that when the carers could no longer continue in their caring role, sufficient plans were in place to avoid a crisis where their son or daughter may be forced into residential care causing unnecessary stress and expense.

Experiences of being: the benefit of drama, music and dancing in improving the wellbeing of older people in care homes

NANDAKUMARA Reva
2017

This report highlights the benefits of using drama and creative techniques with older people, in particular those with dementia. It outlines the results of an initiative which ran drama workshops in 17 Anchor care homes, with the intention that they could become a sustainable part of the activities led by the care home staff to improve the lives of residents, both physically and mentally. A professional drama teacher worked collaboratively with the staff at each care home, and provided opportunities for staff to suggest modifications to the workshops. The results highlight the mental and physical health benefits of the creative activities for care home residents and the sustainability of the methods provided by the trainer at the various care homes. The report concludes that the workshops provide a simple and effective way of improving the experience of care home residents and can easily become part of the selection of regular activities available at care homes. They are inexpensive and scalable and, led to an improvement in residents' levels of self-esteem and self-worth. Care staff also found that the sessions enhanced communication, giving residents the opportunity to share their knowledge and experience and talk about their lives, homes and communities.

Small but significant: the impact and cost benefits of handyperson services

ADAMS Sue
2018

An evaluation of the impacts and cost benefits of handyperson services carrying out small repairs and minor adaptations in the home for older people. It looks at how handyperson service fit into the current policy landscape summarises current evidence on their impact and cost effectiveness. It then provides an in depth evaluation of the of Preston Care and Repair handyperson service, with analysis of outputs, outcomes and examines the cost benefits in relation to falls prevention. The evaluation involved data analysis of jobs completed, a survey of users of the service and interviews with staff and service users. It reports that during the 9 month evaluation period 1,399 jobs were carried out in the homes of 697 older people, which exceeded outcome targets. Of people using the service, 46 percent were over 80 years and 72 percent were older people living alone. Older people also valued the service. Ninety-six percent of those surveyed said that the Preston Care and Repair handyperson service made them less worried about their home and 100 percent said that they would recommend the service to others. Analysis of the falls prevention impact on a small number of higher risk cases, found that for every £1 spent on the handyperson service the saving to health and care was £4.28. Other health and social care related outcomes included a risk reduction for hospital admission risk reduction and faster discharge to home, improved wellbeing, safer independent living, and reduced isolation. The report illustrates the impacts of handyperson services cover health, housing and social care aims and objectives. They also offer a cost effective solution with significant cost benefits and a high rate of return on investment, both financial and social.

Arts in care homes: a rapid mapping of training provision

ALLEN Penny
2018

This report uses desk research, interviews and online searches to map creative training provision available to artists and staff working in care homes in the UK. The mapping took place in 2017 and identified examples of good practice, innovative delivery, and opportunities for growth and development. It total, 65 providers of training were identified, delivering training in person or online. Training was aimed at artists, health/care providers, volunteers, arts venues, activity coordinators and friends/family. Seven main types of training opportunity identified: toolkits; one-off workshops; whole home and leadership training; maintenance models; mentoring; networks and peer learning; and conferences. The results highlight the diverse nature of the sector and the multiple pathways for people to access training, which present both challenges and opportunities for training providers. The author also highlights variation in quality of provision and argues for a system of accreditation. Case study examples are included throughout the report, and appendices provide links to a range of toolkits and providers.

Exposure to nature gardens has time-dependent associations with mood improvements for people with mid- and late-stage dementia

WHITE Piran CL., et al
2018

Exposure to green space and nature has a potential role to play in the care of people with dementia, with possible benefits including improved mood and slower disease progression. In this observational study at a dementia care facility in the UK, we used carer-assessed measures to evaluate change in mood of residents with mid- to late-stage dementia following exposure to a nature garden. We found that exposure to nature was associated with a beneficial change in patient mood. There was a non-linear relationship between time spent outdoors and mood outcome. Improvements in patient mood were associated with relatively short duration exposures to nature, and no additional measureable increases in mood were found with exposures beyond 80–90 minutes duration. Whilst further investigation is required before causality can be determined, these results raise important questions for policy about the integration of outdoor space into the design of dementia care facilities and programmes.

Results 51 - 60 of 251

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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