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Results for 'older people'

Results 51 - 60 of 202

Comprehensive care: older people living with frailty in hospitals

NIHR DISSEMINATION CENTRE
2017

This review looks at the concept of 'frailty' in older people and what can be done to raise awareness amongst hospital staff, so that they can better identify and manage the needs of this ‘frail’ older people. It features 53 completed and ongoing studies funded by the National Institute of Health Research. The review covers four key aspects of caring for older people living with frailty in hospital: assessment; identifying and managing symptoms associated with frailty in hospital; discharge planning; and caring environments which consider the context in which inpatient diagnosis and treatment is delivered. The review highlights promising evaluations of workplace training and interventions. It also identifies a number of tools, such as the Frailty Index, that can help hospital staff to identify the severity of needs and help to provide targeted support. It also finds good evidence that the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) is a reliable way of diagnosing and meeting the needs of older people with input from multi-disciplinary teams. It also identifies areas where more research is needed, which include: maintaining activities of daily living for people admitted to hospital; and the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of different models of delivering care. The review also includes a series of questions that hospital boards, staff and families can ask about the care of older people with frailty in hospitals. Summaries of the 53 studies are also included.

Room to improve: the role of home adaptations in improving later life

CENTRE FOR AGEING BETTER
2017

This report summarises the findings from an evidence review on how home adaptations can improve later lives and provides recommendations to improve access to, and delivery of, home adaptation and repair services. It shows that both minor and major home adaptations are an effective intervention to improve outcomes for people in later life, including improved performance of everyday activities, improved mental health and preventing falls and injuries. It also identifies good evidence that greatest outcomes are achieved when individuals and families are involved in the decision-making process, and when adaptations focus on individual goals. Based on the findings, the report makes recommendations for commissioners and service provides. These include for Local Sustainability and Transformation partnerships to put in place preventative strategies to support people at risk in their home environment; for local authorities to make use of the Disabled Facilities Grant to fund both major and minor adaptations; and for local authorities to ensure people have access to information and advice on how home adaptations could benefit them, in line with the Care Act 2014.

The role of home adaptations in improving later life

POWELL Jane, et al
2017

A systematic review of evidence on the effectiveness and cost effectiveness on how home adaptations can contribute in helping older people to maintain their independence for as long as possible and what works best to improve the health and wellbeing. Conducted by a team from the University of the West of England, the review covered peer-reviewed literature and professional and practitioner-led grey literature published between 2000 and 2016. It found evidence that both minor and major home adaptations can improve outcomes for people in later life, including improved performance of everyday activities, improved mental health and preventing falls and injuries. It also identified good evidence that greatest outcomes are achieved when individuals and families are involved in the decision-making process, and when adaptations focus on individual goals. It also found strong evidence that minor home adaptations are an effective and cost-effective intervention. The report also includes analysis from the Building Research Establishment which shows that home interventions to prevent falls on stairs, can lead to savings of £1.62p for every £1 spent. Based on the findings, the report makes recommendations for commissioners and service provides. These include for Local Sustainability and Transformation partnerships to put in place preventative strategies to support people at risk in their home environment; for local authorities to make use of the Disabled Facilities Grant to fund both major and minor adaptations; and for local authorities to ensure people have access to information and advice on how home adaptations could benefit them, in line with the Care Act 2014.

Physical activity interventions for treatment of social isolation, loneliness or low social support in older adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

SHVEDKO Anastasia, et al
2018

Objectives: This article reviews the effects of physical activity (PA) interventions on social isolation, loneliness or low social support in older adults. Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Method: MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, the Cochrane CENTRAL, CINAHL, were screened up to February 2017. RCTs comparing PA versus non-PA interventions or control (sedentary) condition were included. Risk of bias was assessed using the 12 criteria Cochrane Review Book Group risk of bias. The outcome measures were: social isolation, loneliness, social support, social networks, and social functioning. Standardised mean differences (SMDs) with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for continuous outcomes. Meta-analysis was performed using a random effects model. Results: The search strategy identified 38 RCTs, with a total of 5288 participants, of which 26 had a low risk of bias and 12 had a high risk of bias. Meta-analysis was performed on 23 RCTs. A small significant positive effect favouring the experimental condition was found for social functioning with strongest effects obtained for PA interventions, diseased populations, group exercise setting, and delivery by a medical healthcare provider. No effect of PA was found for loneliness, social support, or social networks. Conclusion: This review shows, for social functioning, the specific aspects of PA interventions can successfully influence social health. PA did not appear to be effective for loneliness, social support and social networks.

The effectiveness of e-interventions on reducing social isolation in older persons: a systematic review of systematic reviews

CHIPPS Jennifer, JARVIS Mary Ann, RAMIALL Suvira
2017

As the older adult population group has been increasing in size, there has been evidence of growing social isolation and loneliness in their lives. The increased use of information communication technology and Internet-supported interventions has stimulated an interest in the benefits of e-Interventions for older people and specifically in having a role in increasing social networks and decreasing loneliness. A systematic review of e-Interventions to reduce loneliness in older people was conducted with the aim to synthesize high quality evidence on the effectiveness of e-Interventions to decrease social isolation/loneliness for older people living in community/residential care. A systematic search of 12 databases for reviews published between 2000–2017 was conducted using search term synonyms for older people, social isolation and interventions. Three independent researchers screened articles and two reviewers extracted data. The Revised-Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews was used to assess the quality of reviews. The final search identified 12 reviews, which included 22 unique primary research studies evaluating e-Interventions for social isolation or loneliness. The reviews were of moderate quality and the primary studies showed a lack of rigor. Loneliness was most frequently measured using the University California Los Angeles Loneliness Scale. Despite the limitations of the reviewed studies, there is inconsistent and weak evidence on using e-Interventions for loneliness in older people.

Demonstrating the health and social cost-benefits of lifestyle housing for older people

HOUSING LEARNING AND IMPROVEMENT NETWORK
2017

This report, commissioned by Keepmoat Regeneration/ENGIE, sets out the evidence for the benefits of developing specialist retirement housing for people aged over 55, including cost savings. It focuses on the benefits of age restricted retirement housing or sheltered accommodation, care villages and specialist extra care housing with services and care on-site. Part one lists key facts and figures on the health and social care cost-benefits of lifestyle housing for older people. Part two provides more detailed findings of the potential benefits including the areas of: social connectedness and reducing loneliness; life expectancy, keeping couples together and supporting informal carers, financial savings in adult social care and the NHS, and preventing the need for institutional care. References and links are listed at the end of the document.

Age Friendly Island: local evaluation. Annual evaluation report 16/17

NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
2017

An evaluation of Age Friendly Island (AFI), a partnership of older people and voluntary and public sector agencies working together across the Isle of Wight (IOW) to reduce social isolation, empower older people and influence local culture so that older people are seen as assets rather than burdens. The evaluation covers the period April 2016 to March 2017, covering data gathered across Year 2 of the Programme. It looks at the impact of the 12 projects that make up the AFI, in relation to four outcomes: older people have improved connections within their local community and reduced social isolation; older people feel empowered to co-produce local policies and services; for older people to feel the Island is age-friendly; and an increased sense of health, wellbeing, and quality of life. The projects reported a total of 9,962 new participants in the period 2016-17, with an average of 1,594 people participating across the 12 projects each month. The evaluation found that participation in the Programme has helped older people to increase their social connections, meet new people, and has led to decreased social isolation for people involved. Participants also reported that involvement in the project led to a positive impact on the health, mental health, wellbeing or quality of life. Whilst there are good examples of genuine co-production, the evaluation identified the need for further progress to enable older people to feel empowered to influence projects, services and policies. The AFI Programme is one of 14 Fulfilling Lives: Ageing Better partnerships funded by the Big Lottery.

Making the case for investing in actions to prevent and/or tackle loneliness: a systematic review. A briefing paper

MCDAID David, BAUER Annette, PARK A-La
2017

Summarises findings from a systematic review on the available economic evidence on the cost effectiveness of loneliness interventions for older people. The review found mixed evidence for the cost effectiveness of befriending interventions and the benefits of participation in social activities, ranging from cost saving to cost ineffective interventions. Recent evidence identified suggests that signposting and navigation services have the potential to be cost effective, with a saving of up to £3 of health costs for every £1 invested. The paper also makes suggestions for strengthening the evidence based on the cost effectiveness of interventions to address loneliness.

Home from hospital: how housing services are relieving pressures on the NHS

COPEMAN Ian, EDWARDS Margaret, PORTEUS Jeremy, HOUSING LEARNING AND IMPROVEMENT NETWORK
2017

This report shows how housing services are helping to relieve pressure on the NHS by reducing delays in discharging people from hospital and preventing unnecessary hospital admissions. It features 12 case studies to show the positive impact these services have on people’s lives and the cost benefit to the NHS. The case studies highlight services that will benefit people most at risk of delayed discharge, such as older people, people with mental health problems and people experiencing homelessness. The case studies also demonstrate a diversity of housing and health services including: 'step down' bed services for people coming out of hospital who cannot return to their own home immediately; hospital discharge support and housing adaptation services to enable timely and appropriate transfers out of hospital and back to patients' existing homes; providing a new home for people whose existing home or lack of housing mean that they have nowhere suitable to be discharged to; and Home from Hospital services to keeping people well at home who would otherwise be at risk of being admitted or readmitted to hospital. The report also considers the impact and additional savings that could be made by housing providers if this work were to be scaled up.

Housing our ageing population: learning from councils meeting the housing needs of ageing population

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2017

The suitability of the housing stock is of critical importance to the health of individuals and also impacts on public spending, particularly social care and the NHS. This report sets out what is required to meet the housing needs and aspirations of an ageing population, outlines the current policy context and presents detailed case studies of good practice to show how councils are innovating to support older people to live in their homes for longer and promote positive ageing. They include examples of integrated approaches to health, housing and care to support older people at home; care and repair schemes to provide support for older people in mainstream housing, long term housing planning; and developing appropriate new housing for older people. The case studies are from Birmingham City Council, Central Bedfordshire Council, Essex County Council, Mansfield District Council, Newcastle City Council, North Somerset, Bristol, Bath and North-East Somerset Councils, and Worcestershire County Council. The report highlights key lessons from the case studies: having a clear vision, promoting awareness and changing attitudes; housing planning, which meets local need and involves older people; delivering and enabling new housing for older people across the public and private sector; developing integrated approaches to housing, health and care; and sustaining older people in mainstream housing. It also outlines recommendations for Government, policy makers, councils, and providers.

Results 51 - 60 of 202

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