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Results for 'outcomes'

Results 21 - 30 of 31

An analysis of the economic impacts of the British Red Cross Support at home service

DIXON Josie, et al
2014

This independent economic evaluation of the British Red Cross Support at Home service focuses on four services which were found to improve outcomes in an earlier British Red Cross evaluation. The services all aim to help people to build their confidence and regain their independence during times of particular difficulty.Those evaluated were 'Next Steps', where volunteers provide home visits and monitor how people are coping following hospital discharge; 'Care in the Home' services delivered by staff and volunteers providing social visits, support and help with household tasks; and a Neighbourhood/Community service in Scotland which focused on linking people to existing services and volunteer-led services such as befriending. The final sample for this analysis consisted of a total of 52 people, the majority of who were over 65. Two outcomes were used in the economic analysis: an increased ability to manage daily activities and improved wellbeing. The evaluation identified cost savings that were related to a reduced need for formal/ informal care and general help around the home; a reduced risk of falls and malnutrition, particularly amongst those with unmet care needs; and, to a lesser degree, a reduced need for treatment of depressive symptoms. The total savings identified amounted to more than five times the cost of the service. The average cost of the intervention was £169 per person (based on the services and sample data in the Red Cross evaluation) and the identified savings came to £880 per person.

Tracking your preventative spend: a step-by-step guide

WILKES Laura
2013

This toolkit helps councils to have a clearer understanding of how much of their budget is spent on prevention, how this contributes to the delivery of outcomes and what this means for increasing their activity towards early action programmes. It sets out the five steps to mapping and analysing spend: establishing a project sponsor and steering group; identifying and agreeing aims, objectives and scope of the project; understanding the outcome; mapping preventative services for the chosen outcome; and analysing and mapping budgets. It covers the practical steps taken and the outputs and challenges of each step. The toolkit draws on work carried out by the British Red Cross with the LGiU and Mears to support Camden Council to track their preventative spend against one of the council’s key outcomes from the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework: to keep older people living independently for longer. The toolkit provides a useful resource for councils, health and wellbeing boards and clinical commissioning groups.

Commissioning befriending: a guide for adult social care commissioners

ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES
2014

A guide developed to inform commissioners of adult social care about how befriending services are being delivered across the South West and how to effectively commissioning high quality befriending services. It describes what befriending is; the different ways it can be delivered; and the positive benefits it can have through improving health, well being and increasing independence. It also explains how people and communities can be involved in delivering and developing services through volunteering. Case study examples of current befriending practice are used throughout. The guide also draws upon materials and guidance produced by the Mentoring and Befriending Foundation (MBF) and feedback from commissioners and befriending providers through a series of consultations undertaken by the MBF.

Outcomes of the active at 60 community agent programme: research report

HATAMIAN Areenay, PEARMAIN Daniel, GOLDEN Sarah
2012

The Active at 60 Community Agents programme was a Department for Work and Pensions fund to encourage community groups and their volunteers to help people approaching and post retirement (particularly those at risk of social isolation and loneliness in later life) to stay or become active and positively engaged with society. It was launched in March 2011 and ran until December 2011. This evaluation of the programme included surveys and interviews with local funders, group leaders, community agents (volunteers whose role aimed to empower and support older people to become and/or stay active) and older people. The report describes the background and methodology of the study and presents the findings, covering the role of Community Agents, reaching and engaging older people, what groups did with the funding, what difference the programme made to older people who took part and wider benefits, the legacy of the programme, and the role of local funders and programme management. It also discusses how far the programme achieved its aims and sets out key lessons learned.

The effectiveness of local authority social services' occupational therapy for older people in Great Britain: a critical literature review

BONIFACE Gail, et al
2013

This literature review systematically selected, critically appraised, and thematically synthesized the post 2000 published and unpublished evidence on the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of occupational therapy interventions for older people in social care services. Identified themes established: the localized nature of social care services for older people; organizational and policy impacts on services, and factors influencing effectiveness and cost effectiveness. Although occupational therapists are increasingly involved in rehabilitation and reablement, there is a continuing focus on equipment and adaptations provision. A high level of service user satisfaction was identified, once timely occupational therapy services were received. Overall, occupational therapy in social care is perceived as effective in improving quality of life for older people and their carers, and cost effective in making savings for other social and healthcare services. However, the complex nature of social care services makes it difficult to disaggregate the effectiveness of occupational therapy from other services.

Technical guide: building a business case for prevention

SOCIAL FINANCE
2014

This guide sets out the issues that need to be considered when developing a business case to invest in preventive services and to ensure that any decision are based on robust and reliable data. The guide focuses on the following arguments: the importance of 'investing to save', arguing that prevention is cheaper in the long term; promotion of service innovation; placing the focus of commissioning on outcomes rather than outputs; and managing a shift in spending from acute to prevention to reduce demand over time. The guide outlines key four activities required to build a business case: understanding needs; understanding current costs; assessing possible interventions; and deciding how to measure the value and outcome of the interventions. It also provides a summary business case for prevention and using a Social Impact Bond (SBI) to finance a business case for prevention. An example case study of making a business case for prevention services in early years services in Greater Manchester is included.

Beginning with the end in mind: how outcomes-based commissioning can help unlock the potential of community services

NHS CONFEDERATION. Community Health Services Forum
2014

Explains outcomes-based commissioning and outlines how it might help enable service transformation. Outcomes-based commissioning incentivises high-value interventions, shifting resources to services in the community, a focus on keeping people healthy and in their own homes, delivering outcomes that matter to people using the services, and coordinated care. It discusses the opportunities that outcomes-based commissioning gives for providers of community services, including the main technical considerations that will need to be addressed. Health outcomes have become the standard for measuring successful care. More and more people are living with long-term, and often multiple, conditions. This briefing argues that successful care for this group of people is not about providing a cure or a certain number of procedures, but about enabling and supporting them to live as well as possible with their conditions over the long term. Achieving this will involve transforming the system so that all of its parts work in an integrated way towards the outcomes people want and need most. Unlocking the unmet potential in community settings is crucial in both transforming care and improving efficiency. The briefing includes practical examples showcasing how community providers are using innovative ways of supporting and enabling people with high levels of clinical need to be cared for at home or more locally, and are working in partnership with other health and care providers. It will be of interest to all commissioners and providers considering developing an outcomes-based commissioning approach that includes community health services. It is particularly relevant to providers of community services.

Homecare re-ablement prospective longitudinal study: final report

UNIVERSITY OF YORK. Social Policy Research Unit
2010

This report provides final findings of a study conducted with ten participating councils to investigate the benefits of homecare re-ablement. The study aimed to identify features of an effective and cost efficient services; maximise outcome and duration of benefits; and to understand and reduce the demands on other formal care, including other social services. The study comprised of three groups of councils: intervention sites which were enablement staff led; intervention sites with mixed staff teams; and comparison sites where service users had not undergone a phase of home care re-ablement. The previous interim study reflected on initial findings from the intervention sites. This report also adds findings from the comparison sites and long term impact from the follow up review stage. Main findings are discussed in the areas of assessment arrangements; discharge and onward referral arrangements; key features of re-ablement services; team skill mix; staff commitment, attitude, knowledge and skill; service users and carer views; and a strong vision of the service.

Prevention services, social care and older people: much discussed but little researched?

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH RESEARCH. School for Social Care Research
2013

A scoping study investigated approaches to prevention services in local authorities which enable older people to retain their independence for as long as possible to maintain their quality of life and reduce pressure on local authority and NHS budgets. The study involved a survey of Directors of Adult Social Services in 9 local authorities to identify what they viewed as their top 3 investments in prevention services for older people, and interviews with lead managers for each intervention. It also reviewed local and national evidence as to whether these interventions lead to a delay or reduction in uptake of social care services This paper summarises the key findings from the research. It explains that the top 3 interventions were reablement (a top 3 approach for all of the local authorities surveyed), technology-based interventions (among the top 3 interventions in 6 authorities), and information and advice (among the top 3 in 3 authorities), while a number of other prevention interventions were identified by one local authority each. It reports on how local authorities seek evidence and guidance on prevention services and factors influencing how local funding was spent, and on assessment of the outcomes and impact of prevention interventions. It also summarises national and local evidence for the top 3 interventions.

Singing from the same hymn sheet? commissioning of preventative services from the third sector

MILLER Robin, et al
2013

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the delivery of preventative services for older people from third sector organisations (TSOs) and the extent to which current commissioning arrangements enables the aspirations of policy to be achieved. Design/methodology/approach: Semi-structured interviews with key-contacts within a sample of TSOs which had been identified by directors of Adult Social Services as delivering one of the top three preventative interventions in their local authority area. Findings: There was evidence of considerable trust between local authorities and TSOs and as a consequence TSOs were given autonomy to develop holistic and integrated models of delivery that supported rather than diverted the TSOs’ core missions. Both sectors found it difficult to set target outcomes and connected performance frameworks for preventative services. As a consequence a major element of the commissioning cycle is not being completed and TSOs cannot be confident that they are using their resources as effectively as possible. Research limitations/implications: This study was based in one English region, and would benefit from being extended to other English regions and home nations. Practical implications: Universities, policy makers, commissioners and the third sector need to work together to develop common outcome frameworks for preventative services and to gather consistent data sets that can be more easily synthesised to give a “realistic” understanding of the impact of different interventions and delivery models. Originality value: The paper contributes to the limited evidence bases of commissioning of TSOs and preventative services.

Results 21 - 30 of 31

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