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Results for 'prevention'

Results 21 - 30 of 180

Community-centred public health: taking a whole system approach. Briefing of research findings

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2020

A summary of research findings into current practice on approaches to community-centred public health, which are important to reducing health inequalities. Community-centred approaches mobilise assets within communities, encourage equity and social connectedness and increase people’s control over their health and lives. The briefing summarises the key elements, core values and principles that are needed to make a shift to whole system approaches to community-centred public health. It provides information on scaling approaches, involving, strengthening and sustaining approaches. The research briefing is one of a suite of resources to help local authority, NHS and voluntary and community sector (VCS) decision makers to implement and embed community-centred approaches to health and wellbeing at scale. Accompanying resources include a slide-deck presentation of main findings, practice examples and a list of alternative whole system frameworks.

Preventative services for older people: current approaches and future opportunities

WISTOW Gerald, LEWIS Helen
1997

Paper written as a background to a seminar on preventative services to older people. Outlines the issues and goes on to look at: what preventative services are; what obstacles to well being are faced by older people; what services there should be; what is currently available; what blockages there are preventing such services being available more widely; what is known about the effectiveness of such services; and key messages for policy makers.

Evidence, insight, or intuition? Investment decisions in the commissioning of prevention services for older people

MILLER Robin, et al
2013

English adult social care commissioners are expected to make ‘evidence based’ decisions on how best to invest public sector funding. This study explores the types of evidence that commissioners use in relation to prevention services for older people and the other factors that influence their investment decisions. A study of local authority Directors of Adult Social Services (DASSs) was used to identify three local prevention interventions. Semi-structured interviews with leads for these interventions explored the evidence and other factors that influenced the investment process. Commissioners drew on a variety of published evidence, in particular that deriving from central government and its regional representative bodies, and third sector organizations with specialist knowledge. Local evidence was also generated through the undertaking of pilots and gathering of performance data. Alongside these ‘rational’ decision-making processes were strong political, personal, and relational dimensions related primarily to the influence of elected members and the hierarchical power of DASSs. Capturing experiential evidence and knowledge of service users and frontline practitioners, being clear about expected impacts and monitoring accordingly, and using recognized evaluation tools would provide further local evidence and enable better comparison and sharing across local authorities.

Preventing need and maximising independence: policy scope

RESEARCH IN PRACTICE FOR ADULTS
2013

This policy briefing provides a summary of policy activity in preventive servcies in adult social care, while identifying the key issues, trends and possible future policy direction. The implications for professionals working at a local level and the benefits for service users are also considered.

Prevention: developing a framework for conceptualising and evaluating outcomes of preventive services for older people

GODFREY Mary
2001

Focusing on older people, this article seeks a way to locate prevention within a theoretical model of successful ageing. This conceptualises ageing as involving adaptation to the changing balance between gains and losses over the life course. Successful ageing is perceived as the attainment of valued goals, the minimisation of losses and maximisation of gains through the linked processes of selective compensation and optimisation. Preventive services may be conceived as resources to be drawn upon to support compensatory strategies. Outcomes and effectiveness of services may be evaluated in terms of whether they facilitate/ allow older people to achieve valued goals. In developing and evaluating preventive services in social care the question is what contribution do specific services make in optimising gains and compensating for the losses that accompany ageing? This framework is explored in respect of two areas ripe for secondary prevention services and strategies - bereavement and instrumental support in the home.

'The billion dollar question': embedding prevention in older people's services: 10 'high impact' changes

ALLEN Kerry, GLASBY Jon
2010

There is a need to invest more fully and strategically in both prevention and rehabilitation for older people, to help them stay healthier, more independent and more socially included for longer and to recover these capacities as fully as possible when they do require hospital treatment. While there is growing recognition that only a more preventative agenda will be sufficient to respond to current and future pressures, there is much less clarity about how to do this in practice. This paper seeks to identify the most promising ‘10 high impact changes’ with regards to prevention in older people’s services. The paper draws on two main sources. The first is an EU review of prevention and long-term care in older people’s services across 14 European counties known as Interlinks. The second key source is a recent review of the social and economic benefits of adult social care, commissioned by the Department of Health and Downing Street. This paper identifies and reviews the following 10 prevention strategies: promoting healthy lifestyles; vaccination; screening; falls prevention; housing adaptations and practical support; telecare and technology; intermediate care; reablement; partnership working; and personalisation.

Ageing better: working with older people to reduce social isolation and loneliness. A guide for Housing Associations

AGE BETTER IN SHEFFIELD
2019

A short guide providing evidence about what’s worked in reducing social isolation and homelessness among older people, focusing on work in the housing sector. It draws on lessons from some of the 14 partners who are delivering projects as part of the Ageing Better programme, which was funded by the National Lottery Community Fund. It identifies five key messages, which include for housing associations: to consider how they can strengthen their strategic and operational roles in addressing social isolation and loneliness; to develop an understand of local areas, mapping areas where older people are at most risk; to share their expertise in co-production to benefit local communities; and to consider further work with care homes for more long-term work to address loneliness and isolation. Although focusing on the housing sector, many of the themes identified have wider applicability to the design of any programmes seeking to reduce loneliness and isolation across all age groups.

What is the evidence on the role of the arts in improving health and well-being? A scoping review

FANCOURT Daisy, FINN Saoirse
2019

This scoping review maps the current evidence on the role of the arts in improving health and well-being, with a specific focus on the WHO European Region. Over 900 publications were identified, including reviews, systematic reviews, metaanalyses and meta-syntheses covering over 3000 studies, and over 700 further individual studies. Overall, the findings demonstrated that the arts can play a major role in the prevention of ill health, promotion of health, and management and treatment of illness across the lifespan. Within prevention and promotion, findings showed how the arts can: affect the social determinants of health, support child development, encourage health-promoting behaviours, help to prevent ill health and support caregiving. Within management and treatment, findings showed how the arts can: help people experiencing mental illness; support care for people with acute conditions; and support end-of-life care. The report raises policy considerations relevant to the cultural and the health and social care sectors. It concludes that the beneficial impact of the arts could be furthered through acknowledging and acting on the growing evidence base; promoting arts engagement at the individual, local and national levels; and supporting cross-sectoral collaboration.

Reaching out: guide to helping principal and local councils tackle loneliness

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF LOCAL COUNCILS
2019

A practical guide to help principal authorities and local councils to work together to tackle loneliness. The guide outlines the current loneliness policy context and uses a range of case studies to demonstrate effective models working in practice. It highlights four ways in which loneliness can be tackled at a local level: finding ways to reach and understand the needs of those experiencing loneliness; providing services that directly improve the number and quality of relationships that people have; providing support such as transport and technology to help sustain connections; and providing the right environment by creating the right structures and conditions locally to support those affected by, or at risk of, loneliness. Case studies include schemes to tackle loneliness and isolation in rural communities; older people's lunch clubs; supporting socially isolated adults and using tablet computers and video conferencing; and a model of Enhanced Primary Care. The guide includes useful check lists, advice on how to measure and evaluate outputs, and links to additional resources.

Community commissioning: shaping public services through people power

LENT Adam, STUDDERT Jessica, WALKER Trinley
2019

This report argues that if there is to be a move to a preventative system in public services, communities need to take on more responsibility for their own health and well-being. The report makes the case for why the process of commissioning of public services needs to be led by citizens and service users, not public sector professionals. It also explains in detail how this shift is happening in practice. The report suggests four key questions that public sector organisations need to consider when moving to a model of community commissioning: the nature of the service - will it be a statutory or non-core service; the nature of the commissioning network - will it be open to all residents within a geographical area only to those with a particular need or interest; the method of power transfer - formal or informal; and the depth of participation. It includes recommendations for central government that would help bring about this transfer of power to communities in the commissioning process.

Results 21 - 30 of 180

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
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