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Results for 'prevention'

Results 41 - 50 of 180

The 'front door' to adult social care

AUDITOR GENERAL FOR WALES
2019

To meet the aims of the Social Services and Well-being (Wales) Act 2014, local authorities need to have created a comprehensive ‘front door’ to social care and to have in places an effective Information, Advice and Assistance (IAA) service. This audit report considers the effectiveness of IAA services in Wales, the availability of preventative and community-based support, and the systems put in place to ensure those who need care and support or are at risk are identified and helped. It also considers the impact of the front door on demand for social care and in respect of improving wellbeing. Although local authorities are supporting people to access a wider range of support options, there is a lack of comprehensive understanding of what is available and the preventative services that are needed. It also found that carers are still not getting equal access to the services they need. Based on the findings, the report concludes that councils are preventing social-care demand, but there is variation in the availability, accessibility and quality of information, advice and assistance services. It makes recommendations to help improve access to information, advice and assistance services.

Review of integrated care: focus on falls

HEALTHCARE INSPECTORATE WALES
2019

Based on a review of integrated care for older people who are at risk of experiencing a fall in Wales, this report highlights learning for staff and for health and social care managers. It focuses on services to help people avoid a fall and how to support people who have had a fall, providing examples of desirable and undesirable pathways through the health and care system. It focuses on the three areas: prevention of falls and promotion of independence, for people living in their own home or in a care home; response to falls when they happen in the community, either for someone living at home or in a care home; and following attendance at hospital due to a fall. It also highlights key themes identified from the review and how the affected service users, service providers and commissioners. The review identified examples of good practice but also found a lack of co-ordination and communication between health, social care and voluntary services could often be a barrier to delivering good quality care. The report has been informed by evidence from six individual falls services, the views of staff and older people. It makes eight recommendations for the Welsh Government, health boards and local authorities. The include a National Falls Framework for Wales, to standardise the approach to preventing, treating and reabling older people who are at risk of falling or have already fallen The report will be relevant for service providers, commissioners and service users.

Combatting social isolation and increasing social participation of older adults through the use of technology: a systematic review of existing evidence

BAKER Steven, et al
2018

Objectives: There are growing concerns that social isolation presents risks to older people's health and well‐being. Thus, the objective of the review was to explore how technology is currently being utilised to combat social isolation and increase social participation, hence improving social outcomes for older people. Methods: A systematic review of the literature was conducted across the social science and human‐computer interaction databases. Results: A total of 36 papers met the inclusion criteria and were analysed using a four‐step process. Findings were threefold, suggesting that: (i) technologies principally utilised social network services and touch‐screen technologies; (ii) social outcomes are often ill‐defined or not defined at all; and (iii) methodologies used to evaluate interventions were often limited and small‐scale. Conclusion: Results suggest a need for studies that examine new and innovative forms of technology, evaluated with rigorous methodologies, and drawing on clear definitions about how these technologies address social isolation/participation. Policy Impact: This systematic review explores how technology is currently being utilised to combat social isolation and increase social participation for older people. A unique aspect of this review is that it incorporates smaller design studies and prototypes. These insights will benefit those considering the potential for information and communication technologies to contribute to older adults’ health and well‐being. Practice Impact: This systematic review explores how technology is currently being utilised to combat social isolation and increase social participation for older people. Insights from the review will benefit practitioners seeking to understand the broad range of technologies that are being applied to these issues, and the common benefits and challenges associated with each approach.

North London Cares and South London Cares evaluation: final report

HITCHIN John, PETIE Olivia, NORRLANDER Amanda
2019

An evaluation Love Your Neighbour and Social Clubs, two programmes to reduce loneliness, improve intergenerational relationships and create a greater sense of community. The programmes, which aimed to bring together people of different generations to spend time together, were delivered across the London based charities North London Cares and South London Cares as part of The Cares Family’s model. The Social clubs programme brings together groups of younger and older neighbours to get involved in activities and socialise; and Love Your Neighbour focuses on one-to-one friendships between older and younger neighbours. The evaluation examines the outcomes for young and older neighbours, the strengths and weaknesses of the model, and highlights the challenges of evaluating community-based models. The evaluation found that overall, The Cares Family model is contributing to positive outcomes in four areas: reduced loneliness and isolation, particularly for older neighbours; improved understanding across the generations; a sense of belonging; and an increased connection to self.

Dance to Health 'Phase 1 roll-out [test and learn]' evaluation: first report

SHEFFIELD HALLAM UNIVERSITY. Sport Industry Research Centre
2019

An evaluation of the Dance to Health falls prevention dance programme. The evaluation investigates whether Dance to Health is an effective and cost-effective way to address older people’s falls and whether the programme helps older people in danger of falling overcome lost confidence, reduced independence and increased isolation. The evaluation used a mixed methods approach that included quantitative, qualitative and econometric research. Primary outcome measures included the impact on falls, positive side-effects (mentally and physically), patient pull, attendance and adherence, fidelity to existing falls prevention programmes and cost effectiveness. The findings show that Dance to Health is helping older people in danger of falling overcome lost confidence, reduced independence and increased isolation. There was a 44 percent reduction in the number of falls, positive improvements in participants' physical and mental wellbeing, including improved Timed Up and Go (TUG) times and reduced fear of falling. Additionally, based on the analysis conducted, there is a potential cost saving of over £149m over a 2-year period, of which £120m is a potential cost saving for the NHS. Dance to Health's fidelity to existing physiotherapy programmes was also confirmed. The evidence suggests that Dance to Health offers the health system a more effective and cost-effective means to address the issue of older people's falls.

It’s time for Local Area Coordination

COMMUNITY CATALYSTS
2019

The report provides information on the Local Area Coordination and highlights the positive impact it has had on communities in England and Wales. Drawing on the experience of the 11 current members of the Local Area Coordination Network, who are local authorities or health services, the report shares stories to show how the model can: make local communities better places to live; improve the health and wellbeing of local people; integrate health and social care; co-produce change with local people; reform the front door to services; and create social value and reduce costs.

Call&Check: a community service which disrupts the norm

DICKINSON Joe
2019

In this project presentation the author, inventor of Call&Check UK, describes the service which is designed to enable people to live independently and confidently in their own homes. Regular visits are made by a postman/postal operator and who asks five short questions to find out how the recipient is and if there is anything they need. Call&Check works not only for older people in communities but for many others who need that little extra support to live at home.

Agents for change: an evaluation of the Somerset Village Agents programme

COMMUNITY COUNCIL FOR SOMERSET
2017

An evaluation of the Somerset Village Agents programme, which aims to reduce isolation and help connect excluded and vulnerable people with services that support them to improve their independence, health and wellbeing. It uses locally based staff who act as first point of contact for people needing information and support. The evaluation, undertaken jointly by South West Forum and Clarity CiC with support from University of Gloucestershire, included analysis of client data, interviews with clients and discussions with locally based staff. Analysis was carried out between October 2016 and February 2017. The results of the evaluation found that the Somerset Village Agents programme is highly regarded by clients, statutory agencies and voluntary and public organisations who have a connection with the programme. It is also helping the most isolated, lonely and vulnerable people in the community, especially older people and those with disabilities and/or long-term health conditions. Areas for potential improvement identified by the evaluation included expanding reach of the programme to reach more younger people and more work to build community capacity. A cost benefit analysis of the programme estimates that for the 21-month period reviewed the Village Agents programme cost £646,000 to deliver and generated £2.5 million in direct savings to the state and a further £2.74 million in wider social value. The report makes recommendations for the future development of the programme.

Bringing people together: how community action can tackle loneliness and social isolation

ANDERSON Zoe, et al
2019

Learning and examples from a range of community and voluntary sector projects tackling social isolation and loneliness in the UK. Drawing on the work of charities, the report considers the causes of loneliness, looks at 'what works' to prevent it and suggests ways to offer support to those who are isolated or lonely. Preventative initiatives include giving something back through volunteering, helping people to take on new interests, and investing in community spaces to help people share interests together. Examples to support those who are lonely or isolated include giving people choices in how to get involved and to make steps manageable, simple solutions such as befriending and peer support, tailoring solutions for different age groups, and using technology such as such as social media and computer tablets to widen access to support. The report shows that supporting people to improve their mindset, building new connections with others, building confidence and developing a new sense of purpose, can have a big impact in reducing feelings of loneliness and isolation. The report is based on interviews with funded organisations and staff in The National Lottery Community Fund staff.

Reducing older people's need for care: exploring risk factors for loss of independence

WHYARD Julia
2019

An executive summary of a report commissioned by Nottinghamshire County Council to explore recent evidence and identify a set of risk factors to older people’s independence. It explores risk factors in three areas: Social and Psychosocial Domain; Long term or Personal Conditions Domain; and Life Events Domain. Risk factors are then further grouped into: modifiable risk factors such as depression or loneliness, where specific support or services can be offered to minimise their impact; and non-modifiable risk factors such as age or history of falls; which can help identify older people at greater risk and who may potentially benefit from some preventative services and support. The report identifies the following factors as being the most significant, primary risk factors to older people’s independence and institutionalisation: Dementia with co-morbidity; Co-morbidity; carer burden; falls; social isolation and loneliness; poor confidence and self-esteem; and poor perception of own health status. The report also highlights examples of preventative tools and interventions that could stop, delay or defer the need for long-term institutional care for older people. The findings will be used to inform Nottinghamshire County Council’s ongoing local development of an “early warning system”.

Results 41 - 50 of 180

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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