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Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

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Results for 'prevention'

Results 61 - 70 of 83

The adult social care outcomes framework 2014/15: handbook of definitions

GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health
2014

This handbook sets out the indicators for measuring adult social care outcomes in 2014 and 2015 using the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework (ASCOF). The framework is designed to support councils to improve the quality of care and support services they provide and give a national overview of adult social care outcomes. The handbook provides technical detail of each measure, with examples to minimise confusion and inconsistency in reporting and interpretation. The indicators are structured around the four key domains set out in the framework, including: enhancing quality of life for people with care and support needs; delaying and reducing the need for care and support; ensuring people have a positive experience of care and support; and safeguarding people whose circumstances make them vulnerable and protecting from avoidable harm.

Developing the power of strong, inclusive communities

MILLER Clive, WILTON Catherine
2014

Sets out a strategy, which can be adapted locally, for how health and wellbeing boards can fulfil new wellbeing and prevention duties under the Care Act. The framework supports the development of strong and inclusive communities and indicates how people, communities and services can more effectively and efficiently work together to co-produce outcomes. The framework incorporates key areas of action for the health and wellbeing boards, which include: keep people at the centre and focus on their outcomes; focus on both assets and needs; focus on all levels of prevention; rethink integration; target people with two or more long term conditions; work through universal service providers; enable community and cross-sector systems leadership; develop a new approach to health and wellbeing strategies; and adopt a collaborative approach to priority setting and savings. The framework has been trialled with a number of trailblazer health and wellbeing boards each of whom refined and adapted it to reflect local circumstances.

Going home alone: counting the cost to older people and the NHS

ROYAL VOLUNTARY SERVICE
2014

Assesses the impact of home from hospital services, which focus on supporting older people in their homes following a stay in hospital and seek to reduce the likelihood that they will need to be readmitted to hospital. The report brings together the findings of a literature review (as well as discussions with relevant experts), the results of the survey of 401 people aged 75 or over who had spent at least one night in hospital on one or more occasions within the past five years, and the outputs from a cost-impact analysis using national data and results from the survey. It sets out the policy context in England, Scotland and Wales, with its focus on preventive care, better integration of health and care services, and on shifting care away from the hospital into homes and communities. It then discusses the demand drivers for these schemes, including the ageing population, the growth in hospital readmissions, and decreasing length of stay. The report examines the experiences of older people after leaving hospital, looking at admissions, discharge, need for support following discharge, and type and duration of support. It suggests that home from hospital schemes can help to improve the well-being of their users and to reduce social isolation and loneliness and the number of hospital readmissions, as well as demand for other health and care services. The results of the cost-impact analysis suggest that, were home from hospital schemes appropriately targeted and effective in addressing ‘excess admissions’, they may produce a saving for the NHS of £40.4m per year.

Tracking your preventative spend: a step-by-step guide

WILKES Laura
2013

This toolkit helps councils to have a clearer understanding of how much of their budget is spent on prevention, how this contributes to the delivery of outcomes and what this means for increasing their activity towards early action programmes. It sets out the five steps to mapping and analysing spend: establishing a project sponsor and steering group; identifying and agreeing aims, objectives and scope of the project; understanding the outcome; mapping preventative services for the chosen outcome; and analysing and mapping budgets. It covers the practical steps taken and the outputs and challenges of each step. The toolkit draws on work carried out by the British Red Cross with the LGiU and Mears to support Camden Council to track their preventative spend against one of the council’s key outcomes from the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework: to keep older people living independently for longer. The toolkit provides a useful resource for councils, health and wellbeing boards and clinical commissioning groups.

Guidance for commissioning public mental health services

JOINT COMMISSIONING PANEL FOR MENTAL HEALTH
2013

The Joint Commissioning Panel for Mental Health (JCP-MH) is a new collaboration co-chaired by the Royal College of General Practitioners and the Royal College of Psychiatrists, which brings together leading organisations and individuals with an interest in commissioning for mental health and learning disabilities. Public mental health involves: an assessment of the risk factors for mental disorder, the protective factors for wellbeing, and the levels of mental disorder and wellbeing in the local population; the delivery of appropriate interventions to promote wellbeing, prevent mental disorder, and treat mental disorder early; and ensuring that people at ‘higher risk’ of mental disorder and poor wellbeing are proportionately prioritised in assessment and intervention delivery. This guide is about the commissioning of public mental health interventions to reduce the burden of mental disorder, enhance mental wellbeing, and support the delivery of a broad range of outcomes relating to health, education and employment. It is the second version of the public mental health guide: It has been revised and updated to include new sources of data and information.

Evaluating integrated and community-based care: how do we know it works?

BARDSLEY Martin, et al
2013

Over the last five years the Nuffield Trust has undertaken evaluations of over 30 different community-based interventions. In many cases the authors have been tasked with identifying whether service changes have led to a reduction in emergency admissions and the associated cost to the NHS. Using these indicators, the results have been almost overwhelmingly negative. The one exception was Marie Curie Nursing Services for terminally ill patients. In this paper the authors outline the main community-based interventions they have evaluated and their impact, and identify nine points that may help those designing, implementing and evaluating such interventions in future. The paper could provide useful learning for the new health and social care integration ‘pioneer’ sites that will be appointed by the Department of Health by September 2013.

Predictive validity of tools used to assess the risk of unplanned admissions: a rapid review of the evidence

PATON Fiona, WILSON Paul, WRIGHT Kath
2014

A synthesis of evidence assessing the predictive ability of tools used to identify frail elderly and people living with multiple long-term chronic health conditions who are at risk of future unplanned hospital admissions. There are now a large number of models available that can be used to predict the risk of unplanned hospital admissions and this study aims to provide a summary of their comparative performance. Overall, the models identified in this review show reasonable concordance in terms of their predictive performance (based on c-statistics). Models reporting other performance indications showed that at different thresholds, as sensitivity increased, specificity would decrease. As the algorithms become more complex or incorporate longer term horizons specificity increased but the ability of the models to identify future high cost individuals reduced. It should also be noted that whilst the reported c-statistics are broadly similar, the underlying populations, data sources and coding may differ.

Technical guide: building a business case for prevention

SOCIAL FINANCE
2014

This guide sets out the issues that need to be considered when developing a business case to invest in preventive services and to ensure that any decision are based on robust and reliable data. The guide focuses on the following arguments: the importance of 'investing to save', arguing that prevention is cheaper in the long term; promotion of service innovation; placing the focus of commissioning on outcomes rather than outputs; and managing a shift in spending from acute to prevention to reduce demand over time. The guide outlines key four activities required to build a business case: understanding needs; understanding current costs; assessing possible interventions; and deciding how to measure the value and outcome of the interventions. It also provides a summary business case for prevention and using a Social Impact Bond (SBI) to finance a business case for prevention. An example case study of making a business case for prevention services in early years services in Greater Manchester is included.

Promising returns: a commissioners guide to investing in mentoring and befriending programmes

MENTORING AND BEFRIENDING FOUNDATION
2012

This guide aims to give an overview of the range, diversity and positive impact of mentoring and befriending activity. Using case studies and programme examples, it outlines a range of mentoring and befriending approaches and identifies the key potential outcomes, including reduced offending, improved community cohesion, improved access to employment, reduced social isolation, higher aspirations and increased independence. The document also explains how the Mentoring and Befriending Foundation can support commissioners identify effective programmes.

‘The Billion Dollar Question’: embedding prevention in older people's services—Ten ‘High-Impact’ changes

ALLEN Kerry, GLASBY Jon
2013

With ageing populations, social changes and rising public expectations, many countries are exploring ways of developing a more preventative approach within their health and social care services. In England, this has become a growing priority over time—made even more significant by recent economic change and by the urgent need to reduce public sector spending. However, a key dilemma for policy makers and managers is the patchy nature of the evidence base—with a lack of certainty over how to reform services or prioritise spending in order to develop a more genuinely preventative approach. Against this background, this commentary reviews national and international evidence around ten policy measures and interventions, highlighting some of the most promising approaches as well as the fragmented and contested nature of the evidence base.

Results 61 - 70 of 83

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