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Results for 'social care'

Results 21 - 30 of 31

Community-led care and support: a new paradigm

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2015

Reports on the key messages from a roundtable discussion on community-led care. The event was hosted by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) and is one of a series of roundtable discussions exploring how to improve care and support at a time of growing demand, demographic change and financial constraint. The discussion aimed to identify, celebrate, support and learn from community-led activity and support and identify practical steps stakeholders can take to support community-led services. The report includes summaries of the presentations from those attending from the organisations: Skillnet Group Community Interest Company, Community Catalysts, Carers UK, Sheffield City Council, and Lloyds Bank Foundation. It also includes views from the round table. Key messages from the event are summarised in four key areas: the positive impact of community-led services; challenges and barriers; building and sustaining community-led services, and enabling community-led services to thrive. The roundtable identified the need to reduce the unnecessary barriers that small, local, user-led services often face in terms of regulations and in building up evidence to support commissioning and investment.

A guide to community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing: full report

SOUTH Jane
2015

Outlines a 'family' of approaches for evidence-based community-centred approaches to health and wellbeing. The report presents the work undertaken in phase 1 of the 'Working with communities: empowerment evidence and learning' project, which was initiated jointly by PHE and NHS England to draw together and disseminate research and learning on community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing. The report provides a guide to the case for change, the concepts, the varieties of approach that have been tried and tested and sources of evidence. The new family of community-centred approaches outlined in this document represents some of the available options that can be used to improve health and wellbeing, grouped around four different strands: strengthening communities - where approaches involve building on community capacities to take action together on health and the social determinants of health; volunteer and peer roles - where approaches focus on enhancing individuals' capabilities to provide advice, information and support or organise activities around health and wellbeing in their or other communities; collaborations and partnerships - where approaches involve communities and local services working together at any stage of planning cycle, from identifying needs through to implementation and evaluation; and access to community resources - where approaches connect people to community resources, practical help, group activities and volunteering opportunities to meet health needs and increase social participation.

The bigger picture: understanding disability and care in England’s older population

LLOYD James, ROSS Andy
2014

Explores disability and care at a national, regional and local authority level in England. The report brings together data from Census 2011, DWP and HSCIC ‘administrative data’, as well as from Wave 6 of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, to look at the prevalence of disability, need and care of different types, and to paint a picture of the lives of different groups. In particular, Chapter 3 provides a snapshot of disability and care in the older population in England, identifying key results. Chapter 4 looks in detail at the lives of older people with limited day-to-day activities, from their health characteristics to their living situation. Chapter 5 explores the characteristics of older people receiving unpaid and paid care including the overall adequacy of their care, as well as older people with substantial levels of disability who experience difficulty undertaking three or more ‘activities of daily living’. Chapter 6 explores the interaction of older people experiencing limited day-to-day activities with public support, i.e. disability benefits and the local authority care and support system. Chapter 7 examines the prevalence of unpaid older carers and the outcomes they experience, as well as the extent of local authority support for them. The report shows that around half of the 65+ population in England reported their day-to-day activities were limited. Of the 6.7 per cent of the older population living at home in England who reported difficulty undertaking three or more activities of daily living, around 70,000 did not receive any care, and could therefore be classed as experiencing substantial unmet need. Around 20 per cent of older carers experienced self-care (ADL) difficulties themselves.

The bigger picture: policy insights and recommendations

LLOYD James
2014

This report evaluates the performance of government policy on care and support of older people who struggle with day-to-day activities in England during the period 2011 to 2013, using the data and insights from ‘The bigger picture: understanding disability and care in England’s older population’. Part 1 of this report examines the reach of publicly funded support; the unmet need in the older population; and variation and consistency of care and support. Part 2 considers the implications of the Care Act implementation and looks at policy development beyond 2016, focusing on eligible needs after the Act, financial eligibility and the means test after 2016 and mapping, identifying and engaging older population groups. The report concludes that given the feasibility and budget challenges implied by the sheer numbers of older people experiencing difficulties with activities of daily living, a rethink and revolution is required among national and local policymakers around how individuals and families are engaged and supported. This will mean revisiting the balance between consistency and variation in services organised by local authorities, as well as fully integrating and exploiting the different ‘touch points’ and ‘gateways’ available for engaging the older population. It will also mean evaluating which aspects of the vision of the Care Act need to be fulfilled by local authorities directly, or can be devolved to empowered, third-party charities and organisations at a local level.

Inclusive integration: how whole person care can work for adults with disabilities

BROADBRIDGE Angela
2014

This report focusses on meeting the needs of working-age disabled adults as health and social care services are increasing integrated. It provides an empirical evidence base to demonstrate how whole person care (which is about making the connections between physical health, mental health and social care services) can be used to effectively meet these needs. The report also draws on the findings of a focus group with 12 disabled adults and carers on desired outcomes from the integration of health and social care services. Interviews with social care and voluntary sector professionals, commissioners and local authority policy to see if they are willing to include working-age disabled adults' needs in plans for future integration. The report looks at how working-age disabled adults have different needs and outcomes from older people and identifies the health inequalities they face in day-to-day life. Ten dimensions of health inequality are identified including housing, employment, financial security and quality of life. The report makes seven recommendations to inform the service response, including: taking a long term view of managing long-term conditions, viewing whole person care as a 10-year journey with matched by stable funding; debates on funding gap in social care should give consideration to the needs of working-age disabled adults; shifting resources from case management to community coordinated care to support prevention and providing a single point of contact for health and social care needs; service integration should take place across a much wider range of services to meet the needs of disabled people.

Local area coordination: from service users to citizens

BROAD Ralph
2012

An exploration of how local area coordination can support people to pursue their vision for a good life, build stronger communities and help reform care services in England and Wales. Local area coordinators, from within their own local communities, provide information, advice and support to help people to solve their own problems. Instead of focusing on deficits, they help people focus on their own vision for a good life, building on their own assets and relationships and acting as a bridge to communities. The model is built on seven key principles, which include: citizenship; relationships; information; the gifts that each member of the community can bring; expertise; leadership; and services as a back up to natural support. The report argues that local area coordination offers the chance for the whole service system to rebalance itself and to focus on local solutions and stronger communities, whilst also offering a powerful catalyst to wider social care system reform.

Can online innovations enhance social care? Exploring the challenges of using digital technology to develop new models of support for older people

AYRES Shirley
2013

Explores how the care sector can take advantage of the power and potential of digital technology and social networks to develop new models of support for older people. The effective use of digital technologies – based around the internet, computers, mobile phones, social networks, telecare and telehealth – are critical in enabling people to live more independent and fulfilling lives, irrespective of their health and care needs. This is especially true as the demand for care services increases. The paper, using a range of good practice examples, highlights the role of digital technology in alleviating social isolation, enabling access to information and knowledge and in supporting the lives and work of many carers around the UK. The paper calls for a better shared understanding of innovations in this sector, a more co-ordinated and coherent approach to enable carers and care seekers to easily access online information and support, greater shared learning, collaboration and partnerships, and the promotion of events that showcase digital technology innovations in care which could be adopted by local authorities, the NHS and housing providers, as well as being purchased by people funding their own support needs.

Prevention services, social care and older people: much discussed but little researched?

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH RESEARCH. School for Social Care Research
2013

A scoping study investigated approaches to prevention services in local authorities which enable older people to retain their independence for as long as possible to maintain their quality of life and reduce pressure on local authority and NHS budgets. The study involved a survey of Directors of Adult Social Services in 9 local authorities to identify what they viewed as their top 3 investments in prevention services for older people, and interviews with lead managers for each intervention. It also reviewed local and national evidence as to whether these interventions lead to a delay or reduction in uptake of social care services This paper summarises the key findings from the research. It explains that the top 3 interventions were reablement (a top 3 approach for all of the local authorities surveyed), technology-based interventions (among the top 3 interventions in 6 authorities), and information and advice (among the top 3 in 3 authorities), while a number of other prevention interventions were identified by one local authority each. It reports on how local authorities seek evidence and guidance on prevention services and factors influencing how local funding was spent, and on assessment of the outcomes and impact of prevention interventions. It also summarises national and local evidence for the top 3 interventions.

Ending the other care crisis: making the case for investment in preventative care and support for disabled adults

AIDEN Hardeep, BUSH Marc
2013

A third of all people using care services are disabled adults of working age. This pamphlet builds on the analysis in 'The other care crisis', which provided evidence that exposed the £1.2 billion gap in social care spending for disabled adults. Based on new research undertaken by Deloitte, this pamphlet quantifies the long-term savings to individuals and the Government of closing this gap in social care expenditure. It recommends that the Government's Spending Review should commit to establishing a national minimum threshold for eligibility that encourages councils to provide social care to people with ‘moderate’ or equivalent level needs The Government should encourage councils and the NHS to jointly invest in preventative care and support through Health and Wellbeing Boards. The Care Bill should contain a duty on Health and Wellbeing Boards to identify, plan for and commission preventative services that maximise the independence of disabled people. This should be a statutory part of their Joint Strategic Needs Assessments and Health and Wellbeing strategies. The pamphlet has been jointly produced by the National Autistic Society, Mencap, the Lenard Cheshire Disability, Sense, and Scope.

The effect of telecare on the quality of life and psychological well-being of elderly recipients of social care over a 12-month period: the Whole Systems Demonstrator cluster randomised trial

HIRANI Shashivadan Parbati, et al
2014

Background: Home-based telecare (TC) is utilised to manage risks of independent living and provide prompt emergency responses. This study examined the effect of TC on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), anxiety and depressive symptoms over 12 months in patients receiving social care. Design: A study of participant-reported outcomes [the Whole Systems Demonstrator (WSD) Telecare Questionnaire Study; baseline n = 1,189] was nested in a pragmatic cluster-randomised trial of TC (the WSD Telecare trial), held across three English Local Authorities. General practice (GP) was the unit of randomisation and TC was compared with usual care (UC). Methods: Participant-reported outcome measures were collected at baseline, short-term (4 months) and long-term (12 months) follow-up, assessing generic HRQoL, anxiety and depressive symptoms. Primary intention-to-treat analyses tested treatment effectiveness and were conducted using multilevel models to control for GP clustering and covariates for participants who completed questionnaire measures at baseline assessment plus at least one other assessment (n = 873). Results: Analyses found significant differences between TC and UC on Short Form-12 mental component scores (P < 0.05), with parameter estimates indicating being a member of the TC trial-arm increases mental component scores (UC-adjusted mean = 40.52; TC-adjusted mean = 43.69). Additional significant analyses revealed, time effects on EQ5D (decreasing over time) and depressive symptoms (increasing over time). Conclusions: TC potentially contributes to the amelioration in the decline in users’ mental HRQoL over a 12-month period. TC may not transform the lives of its users, but it may afford small relative benefits on some psychological and HRQOL outcomes relative to users who only receive UC.

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