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Results for 'strengths-based approach'

Results 11 - 20 of 26

Place-based approaches to joint planning, resourcing and delivery: an overview of current practice in Scotland

BACZYK Monika, et al
2016

Sets out the current landscape of place-based approaches to joint planning, resourcing and delivery across Scotland’s local authority areas. The report captures current place-based activities within 27 local authority areas and includes a synthesis of published materials on the subject. As well as undertaking a review of the literature on place-based approaches to service delivery in the UK, the Improvement Service conducted interviews with local authority areas to find out more about local approaches. Whilst there is evidence of a wide variety of approaches being undertaken, the research also highlights a range of common principles that feature across most areas. The study found that the majority of place-based approaches are adopting a holistic approach, focused on reducing inequalities and supporting people, families and communities to improve their life outcomes in the round. Others are focusing on a specific theme, such as family support, health inequalities, physical regeneration and access to services. The report includes a practical checklist that summarises key issues that partnerships may wish to consider, either when embarking upon a new place-based initiative or when reviewing existing activities.

The community mapping toolkit: a guide to community asset mapping for community groups and local organisations

PRESTON CITY COUNCIL
2016

A toolkit to help community groups to map the individual, community and institutional assets in their local area. A community asset mapping can help to develop a picture of the community to shows its capacity and potential. This information can be used to gain a better understanding of community priorities and create neighbourhood action plans, which make the best use of the local assets. This toolkit explains the process behind asset mapping, looks at how to carry out a Community Street Audit, provides advice on making asset mapping meaningful and ensuring it leads to constructive action, and on involving different sections of the community - including community residents, elected councillors and representatives from local services. Finally it looks at the tools you may need, and how to keep community and local agencies informed of any action plans arising from the asset mapping.

Developing asset based approaches to primary care: best practice guide

INNOVATION UNIT, GREATER MANCHESTER PUBLIC HEALTH NETWORK
2016

This is a practical guide for getting started and growing asset based primary care at scale. It highlights examples of asset based approaches from both within Greater Manchester and beyond. Assets can be broadly grouped into: personal assets e.g. the knowledge, skills, talents and aspirations of individuals; social assets e.g. relationships and connections that people have with their friends, family and peers; community assets e.g. voluntary sector organisations (VSO) associations, clubs and community groups; and neighbourhood assets e.g. physical places and buildings that contribute to health and wellbeing such as parks, libraries and leisure centres. Drawing on research with commissioners, GPs, the community and voluntary sector, public health professionals, patients and the general population, the guide sets out what it takes to make asset based primary care work in practice, and what it would take to adopt it, not just in isolated pockets but across a whole neighbourhood, system or region. It details the background to asset based care, presents ten case studies and makes recommendations for how to develop an asset based primary care in a locality. Key steps to developing and implementing an assets-based approach include: setting up a team to lead the work; understanding which patients to focus on; understanding and mapping the user journey; understanding which approach will work best in a community; creating a development plan for the neighbourhood team; implementing and evaluating the plan; and planning for sustainability.

Developing a wellbeing and strengths-based approach to social work practice: changing culture

GOLLINS Tim, et al
2016

This report discusses the need to for social workers in adult social care to change their workforce culture to one that is 'strengths-based' for promoting well-being, early intervention and prevention. It examines the value of this approach in creating better outcomes for people living more actively in their local communities, generating greater satisfaction for people using services and their carers; and creating a motivated workforce. The report then sets out the key knowledge and skills the social care workforce needs to apply strengths-based approaches in improving people’s lives. It also considers the emerging business case for how a community-focused strengths-based approach can deliver efficiencies for the sector. Cases study examples from Shropshire, Essex County Council, Hertfordshire and Calderdale show how councils and their health partners are developing new ways of working to deliver an alternative health and social care operating model.

Social value of local area coordination in Derby: a forecast social return on investment analysis for Derby City Council

MARSH Hannah
2016

Presents the findings of a forecast analysis of the social value of local area coordination in Derby. The aim of local area coordination is to support residents in the local community to ‘get a life, not a service’, empowering individuals to find community based solutions instead of relying on services. The analysis demonstrates that over the three year forecast period with 10 local area coordinators, local area coordination would deliver significant social value with up to £4 of value for every £1 invested. Further expansion of the service to 17 local area coordinators across all wards would see this value increase further with an increased number of individuals receiving the support. The report highlights that local area coordination is delivering significant benefit to individuals in the community by increasing their overall health and wellbeing. In addition, other stakeholders and the wider community also benefit from local area coordination with community groups forming to address need and benefiting from the promotion through coordinators. The report sets out key recommendations to further optimise the social value created through this service and to better capture the impact and inform future evaluations.

Local area coordination: catalyst for a system wide prevention approach

MCELENEY Maureen, BILLINGHAM Les
2016

Examines the role of local area coordination as a driver for positive systems change. Local area coordination is a personal, human approach to supporting individuals and families to build resilience, relationships and contribution and reduce demand for, and dependence on, services. It also nurtures more welcoming, inclusive and supportive communities and creates the conditions for wider systems change. The report argues that local area coordination works as a driving force for transformation and prevention in three significant ways: person-centred prevention, through building individual, family and community resilience through self-sufficiency and mutual support; behavioural prevention, by helping to produce culture and behaviour change across such diverse groups as social workers, health and housing professionals as well as others, including the fire service; and structural prevention, bringing together the strengths and assets within and across communities, individuals and groups to ensure that available help is utilised effectively. The document also looks at how local area coordination links to other prevention models and sectors, including: ‘Living Well’ programme; social prescribing; housing; employment; and commissioning/market development.

Place-based health: a position paper

STUDDERT Jessica, STOPFORTH Sarah
2015

This position paper sets out some of the challenges in achieving a fundamental structural shift in the health system, citing new evidence from health and local government professionals. The paper sets out the potential of reimagining health as place-based, taking an asset-based approach and focusing on shaping demands in the longer term and ultimately producing better health and wellbeing outcomes. Underpinning this approach is the recognition of the wider determinants of health, where fewer health outcomes result from clinical treatment and the majority are determined by wider factors such as lifestyle choices, the physical environment and family and social networks. Place-based health would mean reconceptualising ‘health’ from something that happens primarily within institutions, to involve all local assets and stakeholders in a shift towards something that all parts of the community, and individuals themselves, recognise and feel part of. This would mean the individual would move from being a recipient of interventions from separate institutions to being at the heart of place-based health. The paper intends to lay out the challenge for the Place-Based Health Commission, which will report in March 2016 and recommend practical steps for professionals in health and care to overcome organisational barriers – real and perceived – and make a fundamental shift towards an integrated system that puts people at the heart of it.

Collaborative healthcare: supporting CCGs and HWBs to support integrated personal commissioning and collaborative care

INCLUSIVE CHANGE
2015

A short guide providing new approaches and practice examples of how Clinical Commissioning Groups and Health Wellbeing Boards can commission and support interventions which embody the principles of collaborative care, individual choice and control and patient and public participation. The six approaches presented are: Experts by experience and self-advocacy; Self-directed support and personal health budgets; Capabilities and asset-based approaches to health and care; Co-production and citizen led commissioning; Community development and building social capital; and Networked models of care. Each includes accompanying practice examples. The guide has been produced by the Inclusive Change partnership of Shared Lives Plus, Community Catalysts, In Control, Inclusion North and Inclusive Neighbourhoods.

Resilience in practice

WALKER Andrew
2015

This paper looks at what resilience means for local authorities and offers guidance for councils in their thinking about the subject. Resilience in this context is defined as the capacity of local areas to respond to immediate crises, to build their resources and adapt to changing circumstances in the future. The paper is based on an in-depth workshop with participants from local government across England, interviews with council officers with responsibility for resilience issues, and case studies that demonstrate some of the innovative approaches that could be taken to enable resilience. The paper begins by summarising existing understandings and definitions of resilience; discusses the issues and concerns that local authorities have with resilience; then looks at some of the ways they are seeking to develop it in their areas. Case examples include a project to develop community resilience in Hounslow and Family Group Conference programme in Camden which contributes to family resilience. The second section outlines a definition and typology of resilience and then applies the typology to the example of climate change. It then proposes a checklist that authorities could follow when developing resilience strategies and interventions. The paper stresses the importance of local authorities working with communities and individuals in partnership to make places more resilient, helping communities use their assets effectively and bringing about holistic change in the way communities function.

Community capital: the value of connected communities

PARSFIELD Matthew, et al
2015

The final report of the Connected Communities for Mental Wellbeing and Social Inclusion programme, which looked at how different interventions can contribute to the development of resilient, inclusive communities with higher wellbeing. This report examines how interventions affect relationships and attitudes, and how relationships and attitudes affect individuals' and communities' ability to develop social value. The programme involved a survey residents in seven ward-sized localities, an analysis of the data for insight into local social networks and wellbeing, and work with local people to develop projects to support social connections. Results found that community-led action and targeted interventions can strengthen local communities and lead to substantial benefits. It is argued that by investing in interventions which build and strengthen networks of social relationships, four kinds of social value or ‘dividend’ shared by people in the community will develop: wellbeing, citizenship, capacity, and an economic dividend through improved employability and health.

Results 11 - 20 of 26

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