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Results for 'strengths-based approach'

Results 21 - 26 of 26

People, places, possibilities: progress on Local Area Coordination in England and Wales

BROAD Ralph
2015

This report outlines the progress made in implementing Local Area Coordination in England and Wales between 2012 and 2015. This intervention aims to reduce demand for health and social care by intentionally working to support individuals, families, carers and communities to stay strong, diverting people from formal services wherever possible through sustainable, local, flexible individual and community solutions. The report, which include examples of implementation, stories of success and data describing the improved outcomes and efficiency, suggests that early development sites are demonstrating significant improvements in the quality of people's lives while also providing savings to public services. The stories in this report illustrate how Local Area Coordination: builds individual, family and community resilience; reduces demand for services; reduces isolation and loneliness; increases choice, control and contribution; builds inclusion and citizenship; is a catalyst for reform; and simplifies the system for local people. The report concludes with the suggestion that the strength of Local Area Coordination rests in its ability to act as a single, local, accessible point of contact - simplifying the system, reducing duplication and focusing on strength, inclusion, leadership and citizenship for all.

Living Well

NHS Kernow Clinical Commissioning Group

The Living Well programme aims to help people to build self-confidence and self-reliance by providing practical support, navigation and coordination to those most at risk of increased dependency and hospitalisation.

Care Act: assessment and eligibility: strengths-based approaches

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2015

This guide summarises the process and the key elements to consider in relation to using a strengths-based approach. Sections provide information on what a strength-based approach is; the information practitioners need to carry out an assessment; using strength-based mapping; and key factors that make a good assessment. It also looks at how local authorities can extend the use of the strengths-based approach from assessments to meeting needs and provides a summary of core local authority duties in relation to conducting a strengths-based approach. It should be read in conjunction with the Care and Support (Assessment) Regulations 2014 and Chapter 6 of the 'Care and support statutory guidance', published by the Department of Health.

Timebanking

Timebanking UK

Timebanking is a means of exchange between people involving time where 1 hour of help = 1 time credit. Timebanking UK supports the development of community time banks where local people are regarded as assets and time banks helps to build mutual social and practical support networks. Timebanking UK is a membership organisation and there are currently 300 time banks across the country involving 30,000 people and 3,700 organisations.

Inside out and upside down: community based approaches to social care prevention in a time of austerity

MILLER Robin, WHITEHEAD Christine
2015

Reflects the experiences of six local authorities in the West Midlands who were identified by the regional ADASS group as seeking to deploy community based approaches within their prevention strategies. These approaches focus on opening up and sharing resources, insights and influence as a means to support individuals and local communities develop their capacity and resilience, shifting from a crisis solution model to a more preventative based social care system. The report begins with a short overview of the six community based approaches based on interviews with the leads in each local authority, and then pulls out key themes relating to the development of such approaches and lessons learnt. These are: community based approaches to prevention can take different forms; it is important to build on the local context; transformation of practice can be achieved in multiple ways; gathering relevant data is difficult but worthwhile; and genuine engagement and co-production with community and staff are central.

Care Act 2014: a strengths-based approach

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2015

One of the aims of the Care Act 2014 is to promote people's wellbeing and independence. By using a strengths-based approach to the assessment process, people can be supported to understand their needs, realise what they can do, and how to best use their skills and networks, to achieve their outcomes. This film looks at what is meant by a strengths-based approach and how practitioners through the assessment process can enable people to be at the centre of their own care and support needs. [This film is no longer available].

Results 21 - 26 of 26

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News

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project New practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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