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Results for 'user views'

Results 21 - 30 of 30

Inclusive integration: how whole person care can work for adults with disabilities

BROADBRIDGE Angela
2014

This report focusses on meeting the needs of working-age disabled adults as health and social care services are increasing integrated. It provides an empirical evidence base to demonstrate how whole person care (which is about making the connections between physical health, mental health and social care services) can be used to effectively meet these needs. The report also draws on the findings of a focus group with 12 disabled adults and carers on desired outcomes from the integration of health and social care services. Interviews with social care and voluntary sector professionals, commissioners and local authority policy to see if they are willing to include working-age disabled adults' needs in plans for future integration. The report looks at how working-age disabled adults have different needs and outcomes from older people and identifies the health inequalities they face in day-to-day life. Ten dimensions of health inequality are identified including housing, employment, financial security and quality of life. The report makes seven recommendations to inform the service response, including: taking a long term view of managing long-term conditions, viewing whole person care as a 10-year journey with matched by stable funding; debates on funding gap in social care should give consideration to the needs of working-age disabled adults; shifting resources from case management to community coordinated care to support prevention and providing a single point of contact for health and social care needs; service integration should take place across a much wider range of services to meet the needs of disabled people.

For future living: innovative approaches to joining up housing and health

DAVIES Bill
2014

Examines older people’s expectations from their housing and housing providers and the choices the UK housing market currently offers older and vulnerable people, and explores innovative housing and care solutions that could meet the demands of an ageing population and more widely support people with other social needs. The study drew on both quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews undertaken in previous research to establish what older groups need and expect from the housing market, and then used statistical methods to create a clear picture of the housing that older people inhabit now and the choices that the English housing market offers to them. Having established that the market presents only a limited range of options to older people, the research explored the international literature to identify different models of housing and support, focusing on countries that face similar demographic challenges. The report considers ideas that could potentially be adopted in England and adapted to an English housing and health context. A number of options were tested with two focus groups, involving over-55s and over-65s. Finally, based on the information drawn from the research, and through consultation with external experts, this report outlines a range of possible policy measures designed to ensure that the current and future stock of housing for older people is more effectively focused on supporting their health requirements.

No assumptions: a narrative for personalised, coordinated care and support in mental health

NATIONAL VOICES, THINK LOCAL ACT PERSONAL
2014

Describes some critical outcomes and success factors in the care, support and treatment of people who use mental health services, from their perspective. It is aimed at helping commissioners and service providers to organise person centred care and recovery oriented support for mental and physical health, and to know when they are achieving it. It offers a definition of personalised, coordinated care in mental health, agreed by people who use mental health services and people who work in health and social care; a series of ‘I statements’, expressing what personalised, coordinated care looks and feels like and some case studies of personalised, coordinated care in practice.

Building dementia-friendly communities: a priority for everyone

GREEN Geraldine, LAKEY Louise, ALZHEIMER'S SOCIETY
2013

The National Dementia Declaration for England (2010) identified that people with dementia want to live in communities that give them choice and control over their lives, provide services and support designed around their needs, and to feel valued and understood, and part of family, community and civic life. This report provides evidence of dementia-friendly communities in England, Wales and Northern Ireland from the perspective of people affected by dementia. It uses the results of a survey of people with dementia (510 respondents) distributed by Alzheimer’s Society staff and other networks in Autumn 2012 (referred to as the DFCsurvey) to explore the barriers that people face in their community, how they would like to be engaged in their local area, and the support they need to enable them to do so. Overall, the report aims to provide guidance to areas that are looking to become dementia-friendly, and to provide extra evidence for those already committed to becoming dementia-friendly. Evidence from people with dementia and their carers is collated alongside examples of projects that are making a difference for people with dementia. This information is used both to provide a definition of a dementia-friendly community, and to suggest 10 key areas of focus for communities to consider in working to become dementia friendly. These 10 key areas are: challenge stigma and build understanding; accessible community activities; acknowledge potential; ensure an early diagnosis; practical support to enable engagement in community life; community-based solutions; consistent and reliable travel options; easy to navigate environments; and respectful and responsive businesses and services. While there are some excellent examples of communities that are adapting themselves to the needs required by dementia, many people with dementia do not feel supported and a part of their local area; and are not able to take part in activities that they enjoyed before they developed the condition. Loneliness, feeling isolated and lack of confidence were identified as major barriers.

Homecare re-ablement prospective longitudinal study: final report

UNIVERSITY OF YORK. Social Policy Research Unit
2010

This report provides final findings of a study conducted with ten participating councils to investigate the benefits of homecare re-ablement. The study aimed to identify features of an effective and cost efficient services; maximise outcome and duration of benefits; and to understand and reduce the demands on other formal care, including other social services. The study comprised of three groups of councils: intervention sites which were enablement staff led; intervention sites with mixed staff teams; and comparison sites where service users had not undergone a phase of home care re-ablement. The previous interim study reflected on initial findings from the intervention sites. This report also adds findings from the comparison sites and long term impact from the follow up review stage. Main findings are discussed in the areas of assessment arrangements; discharge and onward referral arrangements; key features of re-ablement services; team skill mix; staff commitment, attitude, knowledge and skill; service users and carer views; and a strong vision of the service.

Prevention is better than cure ...

WARD Cally, COOPER Vivien
2013

Purpose: The purpose of this article is to provide a perspective from family carers on the promotion of independence and the prevention of avoidable dependency. Design/methodology/approach: Narrative review and discussion. Findings: Family carers frequently experience their own or their relatives’ needs being met only when they have reached crisis point. A shift to a more preventive approach, delivered in a personalised and family-centred manner, could transform the experiences of people with learning disabilities and their families. Originality/value: Attention is drawn to the importance of strengthening the case for a preventive approach and the role of co-ordinated and strategic leadership in its delivery.

Recovery-focused practice in mental health

LEESE Daniela, SMITHIES Lynda, GREEN Julie
2014

This article aims to identify service users and nurses perspectives on recovery -focused practice through themes in the literature. Seven studies and two reflective articles were selected for consideration. Three common themes emerged as essential nursing characteristics needed for recovery-focused practice: hope, person-centred care and consideration of service users' perspective. Recommendations on how practice could be improved are suggested from these themes. Key points include involving family members in care, involving service users in decisions, and spending time with service users to aid recovery.

The user voice: older people's experiences of reablement and rehabilitation

TRAPPES-LOMAX Tessa, HAWTON Annie
2012

Effective reablement is dependent on service users' co-operation and motivation. It therefore needs to be highly responsive to their needs and views. This study offers specific user views about their experiences in different settings and at different stages of reablement, together with their ideas for how it might work better. The study describes the experiences of 42 older people in rehabilitation services in community hospitals and local authority short-term residential units followed by “usual care” services at home. It is based on semi-structured face-to-face interviews in 2002/3, from East and Mid Devon, England. Findings revealed four main themes: the complexity of rehabilitative need; the influence of the setting; the role of the staff; and the availability of reablement support back at home. The authors concluded that the findings demonstrate changing rehabilitative needs along the care pathway, with implications for commissioners and providers of reablement services.

Well-being and dementia - how can it be achieved?

WOODS Bob
2012

In this article, the author reviews findings in dementia care on interventions and on quality of life with the aim of identifying factors associated with quality of life which can form the basis for interventions enhancing quality of life for people with dementia. The article looks at evaluation of well-being and quality of life in people with dementia, including the importance of "hearing the voice of people with dementia", and the key factors predicting quality of life in people with dementia. Drawing on this, it suggests potential strategies and interventions for improving quality of life in people with dementia: improve mood, maintain health, hopeful staff attitudes, reduce use of anti-psychotic medication, enhance relationship with carer, encourage family involvement, cognitive stimulation and cognitive rehabilitation, and creative activities and approaches.

Reducing social isolation and promoting well being in older people

HEMINGWAY Ann, JACK Eleanor
2013

A UK charity established a network of 70 friendship clubs in the south of England, facilitated by volunteers, with the aim of promoting well-being for older people. The charity provides venues and transport for participants to meet and enjoy activities locally every week for 2 hours. This article reports on a 3 year research project exploring the impacts of the intervention, using qualitative research methods and including participant observation and individual and focus group interviews. The study was based on 10 of the friendship clubs and collected information from 82 members and 18 volunteers. The article describes the intervention and the study methodology. It presents the results, with illustrative quotations from participants, covering views on the risk of becoming isolated, feeling isolated, and friendship and support. It identifies additional factors that can predispose an individual to become socially isolated, including environment and safety fears, fear of falling, and loss of confidence, and notes that even when living with their families older people can still feel socially isolated. It reports that club members and volunteers viewed themselves as assets for each other, offering support, advice and friendship, and that, overall, the perceived benefits for attendees of attending the friendship clubs fell into 3 key areas: improved well-being, social relations, and mental and physical health.

Results 21 - 30 of 30

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LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project New practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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