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Results for 'wellbeing'

Results 21 - 30 of 69

Systematic review: music, singing and wellbeing for adults living with diagnosed conditions

DAYKIN Norma, et al
2016

A systematic review of wellbeing outcomes of music and singing for adults, encompassing data from 1364 participants with identified health conditions such as stroke, COPD and mental health conditions. The review does not include clinical studies of music and singing, including interventions for patients in hospital, where the focus is on clinical outcomes such as pain management or coping with symptoms or hospitalisation. The evidence points to wellbeing outcomes including reduced depression and anxiety in people of all ages. In relation to adults with adults with chronic conditions such as stroke, COPD and cancer, the studies report reduced stress and improved wellbeing across a range of outcomes. Specifically, the review finds that there is high quality evidence that: targeted, culturally relevant music interventions can decrease depression in nursing students in a college environment; brief music therapy is an effective intervention to support wellbeing of palliative care patients in hospital settings. There is moderate quality evidence that: targeted, culturally relevant music interventions, including playing a musical instrument and singing, can decrease depression in older people with chronic conditions in residential and community settings; participants report a wide range of wellbeing benefits from singing including relaxation, distraction, reduction in anxiety, spiritual uplifting and improvements in mood, emotional wellbeing, confidence, enjoyment and a ‘feel good factor’; participation in a music project can raise participants’ awareness of the significance of music in their life. This in turn can have a positive effect on awareness of health and quality of life and can encourage behaviour change.

Systematic review: music, singing and wellbeing for adults living with dementia

VICTOR Christina, et al
2016

A systematic review of the subjective, self-reported wellbeing outcomes of music and singing in adults living with dementia. The review encompasses data from 249 participants in quantitative and qualitative studies from Australia, Canada, Finland, France, and the United Kingdom. It encompasses interventions focusing upon singing or listening to music. Three key domains of wellbeing are reported: quality of life, depression and anxiety. Studies and findings where the methodology entails observation by a researcher or clinician of the effects of music and singing on the wellbeing of people with dementia were excluded. In addition, the review excluded studies where the outcome was defined in terms of dementia or clinical symptoms or where the focus was on outcomes for carers. Given these caveats the key findings are that for people with dementia music and signing are important aspects of subjective wellbeing that can promote domains of subjective wellbeing, social connections and maintenance of identity. Active participation seemed to be less beneficial than listening to music but this is only a very tentative finding which needs support by further research. On the current evidence base, the review supports the development of policy and practice of support for music and singing interventions for wellbeing outcomes for people with dementia but suggests that interventions should reflect both active and passive forms of engagement.

Review of the grey literature: music, singing and wellbeing

DAYKIN Norma, et al
2016

This report reviews evidence from the grey literature on wellbeing outcomes for music and singing for adults. The evidence was received through a call for evidence placed on the What Works Wellbeing website in 2016. A total of 51 reports were received, of which 32 met the inclusion criteria. These included: 12 reports on music and singing interventions with healthy adults; 12 reports on participants with a range of diagnosed conditions including COPD, Parkinson’s, stroke and mental health conditions; and eight reports on participants living with dementia. An additional five unpublished PhDs were also identified. The report summarises the evaluation methods used in the projects; quantitative and qualitative wellbeing outcomes identified; and process evaluations carried out. The review found evidence of improved mental wellbeing in evaluations of two singing interventions for people in the community experiencing, or at risk of, mental health problems. Two studies of music interventions for older participants in hospital also reported improvements in observed wellbeing. Qualitative findings also suggest that participants involved in singing and music projects report positive outcomes such as improved mood, purpose and social interaction. Adults with dementia also experienced increased engagement, relaxation, and better connection with others. Key issues reported from process evaluations included: barriers to activity, such as lack of accessible transport; institutional barriers, particularly in care home settings where projects rely on the support of care staff and managers. Limitations of the evidence are also briefly discussed.

Ageing Better: social prescribing and older people: guide to developing development project plans

HOY Christine
2014

Developed as part of the Better Ageing project, this guide provides advice on developing social prescribing plans and approaches as a way of tackling loneliness in older people. It highlights the importance of ensuring that social prescribing initiatives sustainable by engaging the support of local groups such as general practices, voluntary and third sector organisations. It also highlights key stages of developing any plan. These include: the importance of empathy and awareness when holding initial conversations to link people with support; mapping local assets, groups and activities; developing ways to find and use information about local sources of support; the collection of evaluation data; use of digital technologies in social prescribing; and presenting local plans using appropriate language and vocabulary. It also suggests key areas that could be covered in social prescribing plans, such as governance and accountability, plan for local evaluation, local collaboration and training and support needs. Includes a list of useful links and resources.

The benefits of making a contribution to your community in later life

JONES Dan, YOUNG Aideen, REEDER Neil
2016

Reviews existing evidence on the benefits for older people of volunteering and making unpaid contributions to their communities in later life. The report covers ‘community contributions’ to refer to this whole spectrum of unpaid activity, including individual acts of neighbourliness, peer support, formal volunteering and involvement in civic participation. The report looks the state of the current evidence base; the main areas of benefit for volunteering in later life, who currently benefits from volunteering and in what circumstances. The review identifies good evidence that older people making community contributions can lead to benefits in: the quantity and quality of their social connections; an enhanced sense of purpose and self-esteem; and improved life satisfaction, happiness and wellbeing. The evidence was less clear on the impact on health, employment and social isolation. The review also found that people aged 50 with fewer social connections, lower levels of income and education, and poorer health may have the most to gain from helping others. However, the people most likely to volunteer are those who are already relatively wealthy, in good physical and mental health, and with high levels of wellbeing and social connections. The report makes recommendations for organisations, funders and commissioners working with older volunteers. These included: maximise the benefits of volunteering by focusing on engaging older people who are relatively less well connected, less wealthy and less healthy; avoid an over reliance on volunteering alone to tackle serious issues related to physical health, frailty, social isolation or employability; and ensure that older people engaged in volunteering have meaningful roles, with opportunities for social interaction.

Wigan community link worker service evaluation

INNOVATION UNIT
2016

Evaluation of the Wigan Community Link Worker (CLW) service, which was set up as a pilot in 2015 to improve the health and wellbeing of local people by helping them to access community based support and activities. It also helps those referred to use their skills and experience through volunteering. The evaluation, commissioned by Wigan Borough CCG and Wigan Council, aims to gain a better understanding of how the service is working, who is using it and what difference it is making to clients and referring services. The evaluation draws on an analysis of referral data, case studies and qualitative interviews with commissioners, people running services, patients, community link workers and representatives of voluntary and community organisations. Findings report high levels of commitment to the service from stakeholders, with health and care professionals valuing the service and promoting it to colleagues and clients. A total of 784 clients were supported between January 2015 and March 2016. Over half of these clients were over 55, with social isolation and mental health issues the most recurrent presenting issues, along with benefits and financial advice. The service is also used by number of carers. Client stories suggest that CLWs help them to feel supported and able to contribute in their community. The evaluation also found anecdotal evidence of reduced pressure on mainstream services. Recommendations include that the service retains it wide referral and low threshold for access; development of the skills of CLWs as relational workers through peer support and reflective practice; and enlists CLWs, clients and health professionals in co-designing and co-producing the service in the future.

Access to outdoor recreation by older people in Scotland

COLLEY Kathryn, et al
2016

Scottish research study to examine the barriers preventing older people, including older people with long-term health conditions and disabilities, from accessing outdoor recreation opportunities. The research involved two stages: an investigation of the spatial distribution of older people using small-scale geographical units and semi-structured interviews with 27 older people across three case study sites of varying levels of urbanity and access to different types of green/blue natural resources. Results from the spatial distribution analysis found that remote areas and isolated small towns had higher concentrations of older people and older people with health problems or disabilities. It also identifies that the negative impacts on the well-being and resilience of local communities are also likely to be stronger in remote areas, with challenges in accessing medical and care facilities. The case study work found the barriers to participation in outdoor recreation by older people are multiple and inter-related. Key categories of barriers identified in the interviews were: poor health and (im)mobility; lack of or reduced social connections; fragility and vulnerability; lack of motivation and time commitments; safety; and weather and season. Key implications for policy and practice identified from the research include: for interventions to address the multiple and interrelated barriers preventing older people from participating in outdoor recreation, using integrated and holistic approaches involving different organisations; for ‘green prescribing’ by doctors and medical professionals to be integrated with existing initiatives (eg walking groups) which offer opportunities for overcoming social and motivational barriers; and for interventions to identify ways of providing transport access to outdoor spaces to older people.

Arts in care resource pack

CARE INSPECTORATE
2016

An online resource pack which brings together a collection resources to help promote the importance of arts and creative activities for older residents in care homes. The resource aims to support care staff to plan and run creative arts sessions and help then work with professional artists. It includes a film where three care homes and their residents share their experience of participating in the arts and the difference it has made to living life well. It also includes ‘recipe cards’ for five different arts forms created by artists for care staff. These cards provide ideas and methods to help care staff to run a variety of creative arts sessions within care homes. They cover creative dance, writing poetry, facilitating a singing session, print making and salt dough. The pack also contains guidance on working with professional artists. The pack was developed in partnership with Luminate and a national working group which included representatives from Creative Scotland, the voluntary and independent sectors, Scottish Care, the Scottish Poetry Library, NHS and professional artists.

Public health's role in local government and NHS integration

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2016

Drawing on information from six case studies, this report makes the case for greater engagement of public health in supporting integration across local government and the NHS. It identifies two reasons for public health to be involved in integration: the skills, capacity and expertise public health teams can bring, and the potential of integration for improving health and wellbeing. The report explores four areas in which public health involvement in integration has been found to make the greatest impact: collaborative systems leadership, a population approach, a focus on prevention and developing outcomes. A short self-assessment tool is also included which can be used for areas to consider the extent of public health involvement in integration in their own area. The case studies come from Doncaster, Hertfordshire, London Borough of Richmond, Somerset, Wakefield and Worcestershire.

Relationships in the 21st century: the forgotten foundation of mental health and wellbeing

MENTAL HEALTH FOUNDATION
2016

Examines how investing in building and maintaining good relationships and tackling the barriers to forming them positively impact on mental health and wellbeing. The evidence shows that people who are more socially connected to family, friends, or their community are happier, physically healthier and live longer, with fewer mental health problems than people who are less well connected. The paper looks at relationships across the life course and why they matter, focusing on children and young people, adults and later life. Higher rates of mental health problems such as depression and anxiety have been associated with loneliness, isolation and social rejection during adolescence and similarly having few close relationships has been linked to higher rates of depression and stress in older adults. The report calls on national governments, public bodies and employers to promote good relationships and tackle barriers, including mounting pressures on work–life balance and the impact of bullying and unhealthy relationships.

Results 21 - 30 of 69

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