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All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 51 - 60 of 313

Quick guide: supporting patients' choices to avoid long hospital stays

NHS ENGLAND, et al
2016

This quick guide provides practical advice to help local health and social care systems reduce the time people spend in hospital when they no longer need acute care, but are delayed whilst making decisions about or making arrangements for their ongoing care. The guide covers: providing people with information about their choices after hospital discharge, providing support to allow patients to make choices about their ongoing care, the availability of care homes and care packages at home, a patients refusal to leave hospital, and use of interim packages and placements. Each section includes a checklist of actions to consider to help identify areas for improvement and examples of practical solutions to common problems, including links to useful resources. A template policy and template patient letters that can be customised and used locally are also included.

Helping people look after themselves: a guide on self care

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2016

Brings together eight case studies which show how local authorities in England are involved in a range of innovative schemes to encourage self-care and self-management of long term conditions. The case studies covering both rural and urban environments and with varying levels of deprivation and affluence. The examples include: a network of integrated teams to work with residents at risk; development of a website to help people with long-term conditions to become more involved in self-care; a hotline to promote health lifestyles and self-care, linking people with local services in the local authority, NHS and voluntary sector; a programme to tackle loneliness and social isolation in older people, improve health and wellbeing; Nottingham’s ‘super’ self-care pilot, which includes social prescribing and care navigators; and work in Kirklees which is encouraging the self-management of long term conditions through education, technology, exercise and one-on-one help.

The power of peer support: what we have learned from the Centre for Social Action Innovation Fund

GRAHAM Jullie Tran, RUTHERFORD Katy
2016

This report looks at the value of peer support and the part it can play in a people-powered health system. It also shares practical insights from 10 organisations involved in Nesta’s Centre for Social Action Innovation Fund on how peer support can be effectively scaled and spread to benefit more people. The ten case studies provide details of the peer support innovations and evidence of their impact to date. The peer support models developed included one-to-one peer support, group peer support and digital approaches. From the ten peer support innovations, the report highlights key learning about the realities of delivering peer support across a range of conditions and with very different groups of people. These covers engaging people in peer support; recruiting, training and supporting peer facilitators; and evaluating and improving peer support. The report finds that peer support has the potential to improve psychosocial outcomes, behaviour, wellbeing outcomes, and service use. It also found that reciprocity was an important motivator for volunteers and that the most effective volunteers were trained and well supported. It concludes with what the future might hold for those working with and commissioning peer support in England. Recommendations include developing relationships with public service professionals to help them understand the value of peer support and embedding peer support alongside existing services.

The missing million: a practical guide to identifying and talking about loneliness

CAMPAIGN TO END LONELINESS
2016

A practical guide providing advice to help commissioners, service providers, frontline staff and volunteers to better identify and engage with older people experiencing, or at risk of experiencing loneliness. The guide draws on evidence from an earlier Campaign to End Loneliness Report 'The missing million: in search of the loneliest in our communities'. The first section outlines a range of data sources to help identify loneliness, including heat maps, the Exeter data system of patients registered with GPs, and a Community Insight tool developed by the Housing Associations Charitable Trust. It also explores how working with local communities and developing partnerships with individuals, groups and other agencies can help to help identify loneliness. Examples show how existing social networks in communities also have an important role to play in providing support and reducing loneliness. The second section provides recommendations on how best to engage with older people, highlighting the importance of understanding what loneliness is, having the right skills to talk to older people about loneliness, and providing appropriate support for the individual. Examples of effective and innovative approaches to supporting older people experiencing, or at risk of experiencing, loneliness, are also included. These include social prescribing, Talk for Health, and using social media and technology.

Quick guide: health and housing

NHS ENGLAND
2016

This is one of a series of quick, online guides providing practical tips and case studies to support health and care systems. It provides practical resources and information for Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) from a range of national and local organisations on how housing and health can work together to prevent and reduce hospital admissions, length of stay, delayed discharge, readmission rates and ultimately improve outcomes. Specifically, the guide describes: how housing can help prevent people from being admitted to hospital – by enabling access to home interventions (social prescribing), improving affordable warm homes (safe, warm housing), improving suitability and accessibility, and providing housing support; how housing can help people be discharged from hospital – through coordination of services, provision of step down services, and accessible housing design; and how housing can support people to remain independent in the community – by enabling informed decisions about home and housing options, providing assistive technology and community equipment, supporting social inclusion, providing supported housing, and promoting healthy lifestyles.

Community action programme: literature search

NGUYEN Hong-Anh, MAGGS Deena
2015

This bibliography contains the results of a literature search on community action. The search used a wide range of search terms across a number of different sources of evidence, including health and social care databases, social sciences / social welfare, economics, public administration and relevant grey literature (including trade and mainstream press). The body of research on community action in public services covers a vast array of concepts involving and including community/user involvement and engagement; community empowerment; co-production, co-creation and collaboration in service design and delivery; how social networks and personal relationships contribute to community resilience; and the evaluation and assessment of these processes. The results of this literature search have been organised thematically to broadly reflect these issues and recent models of delivery, such as the Big Society or place-based services.

Harnessing social action to support older people: evaluating the Reducing Winter Pressures Fund

GEORGHIOU Theo, et al
2016

Presents the findings of an evaluation of seven social action projects funded by the Cabinet Office, NHS England, Monitor, NHS Trust Development Authority and the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services. The aim of the Reducing Winter Pressures Fund was to scale up and test projects that used volunteers to support older people to stay well, manage health conditions or recover after illness, and thereby reduce pressure on hospitals. The organisations supported by the fund comprised a range of national and local charities. These projects fell into three broad categories: community-based support, supporting discharge from hospital wards, and supporting individuals in A&E department to avoid admissions. Between them, the projects offered a wide range of services to older people – both direct (for example help with shopping or providing transport) and indirect (linking with other services). The evaluation resulted in a mixed set of findings. From the interviews with staff, volunteers and local stakeholders, there was evidence of services that had made an impact by providing practical help, reassurance and connection with other services that could reduce isolation and enable independence. Those involved with the projects felt that volunteers and project staff could offer more time to users than pressurised statutory sector staff, which enabled a fuller understanding of a person’s needs while also freeing up staff time. However, the analysis of hospital activity data in the months that followed people's referral into the projects did not suggest that these schemes impacted on the use of NHS services in the way that was assumed, with no evidence of a reduction in emergency hospital admissions, or in costs of hospital care following referral to the social action projects. The one exception was the project based in an A&E department, which revealed a smaller number of admissions in the short term. The report questions whether these sorts of interventions can ever be fully captured solely using hospital-based data and conceptualising reduced or shortened admissions as a key marker of success.

Hidden in plain sight: the unmet mental health needs of older people

STICKLAND Nicolette, GENTRY Tom
2016

Examines the extent to which the current provision of mental health services fails to meet the increasingly high demand from the ageing population. The report shows that currently 3 million people in the UK over the age of 60 are living with depression; this figure is set to rise to 4.3 million in the next 15 years due to the growing number of older people in our society; the NHS is not providing those in later life with mental health problems with sufficient treatment options, such as talking therapies and integrated care plans. The report makes a number of recommendations to build on progress already made and ensure that older people’s mental health gains not only parity of esteem with physical health concerns but parity with other age groups. These include: creation of a work stream dedicated to meeting older people’s mental health needs, as part of the implementation of Mental Health Taskforce recommendations; local health and care commissioners should fully understand the prevalence of common mental health conditions among the over 65s in their areas; each clinical commissioning group and local authority should consider appointing “older people’s mental health champions”; and all services should be appropriately funded and equipped to deliver fully integrated care that addresses mental and physical health and comorbidity.

The homecare deficit 2016: a report on the funding of older people’s homecare across the United Kingdom

UNITED KINGDOM HOMECARE ASSOCIATION
2016

Drawing on data obtained from freedom of information requests, this report analyses average prices paid by councils for home care services across all four administrations of the United Kingdom. It also provides a breakdown by England’s nine government regions. The data were obtained during a sample week in April 2016 following the introduction of the new National Living Wage. The analysis found that only one in ten authorities paid an average price at or above UKHCA’s minimum price of £16.70 per hour. It also found that seven authorities paid average prices which the UKHCA believe are unlikely even to cover care workers’ wages and on-costs of £11.94 per hour. Only 24 councils had completed calculations for the costs of home care. The report highlights the low rates that many councils are paying independent and voluntary homecare providers. It argues that this underfunding is a root cause of the instability of local homecare markets and the low pay and conditions of the homecare workforce. The analysis also exposes the level of risk that councils place on a system intended to support older and disabled people. The report makes a number of recommendations, which include the need for local authorities to provide calculations of their costs of homecare.

Local authorities + older people + arts = a creative combination

CUTLER David
2013

This report presents the case for local authority involvement in arts projects for older people. It sets out the benefits of participation in the arts for older people, it also argues that arts projects have additional benefits which can help local authorities deliver their own objectives at a time of increasing financial cuts. The report highlights five roles and interests of local authorities that makes them uniquely well suited to promote arts in the lives of older people. These are: improving the health and well being of older people, including reducing loneliness; arts and cultural services; integrating arts into older people's services and social care; social inclusion and community development; and leadership and coordination. Six case studies are included to illustrate the work that can be led or supported by local authorities. These include using arts to promoting mental and physical well being in St Helens; tackling loneliness in Fife; the provision of arts and social care services in Epping Forest; and leadership and coordination in Manchester. It also highlights relevant organisations and resources.

Results 51 - 60 of 313

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